193 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

An exterior view of the property.
"The roof on the new modules has the same angle as the original hut, but reversed, giving value to the original project, while the new modules acquire a new identity inspired by the pre-existing architectural object," Alejandro says.
The pitched roofs are topped with CINDU metal cladding.
La Casa Pequena in Oaxaca, Mexico
The tasting room self reflects in the winery's pond which is sourced from the region's abundant rainfall.
The south facade showcases the third level addition and new wood, metal and concrete cladding materials.
Thermoplastic Polyolefin (TPO) was installed for the flat roofs.
Vertical cast-in-place concrete walls break up the building's horizontal forms.
Set between massive oak trees, the home was sensitively placed to minimize site impact.
"The roof of the lower level becomes the terrace of the upper level, with unobstructed views to the south," says principal architect Robert Swatt.
The house is, thanks to a new owner, in excellent, original condition.
The covered parking pad is supported by an exposed concrete volume with (unseen) built-in storage. The concrete also provides protection against water runoff from the mountain.
At the back of the property is a deliberately understated entrance, and a simple canopy that shelters the front door. This door opens onto a landing, from which a broad corridor follows the natural gradient alongside a generous garden courtyard.
"This distinctive sheltering shape is again expressed in the wrapped floor-wall-roof profile of the three wings, which—assembled together, one above the other—track the site as it slopes toward the water," says Philip Olmesdahl.
The surrounding grounds were relandscaped to create even more privacy and garden views from the house and around the tennis court and pools.
Essentially, the entrance was kept in the same spot, with the chimney to the far right side.
The boxy, contemporary new facade was completely restructured.
The entrance to the home follows a compressed stair sequence that travels under the bridge. On one side, the path is bounded by the close growth of the oak grove, and the other opens to a sunny courtyard.
The home’s program is split between two structures, each completing one arm of the L shape, and connected by an enclosed, second-story bridge.
A look at the backside of the home.
A sneak peak.
Stone and concrete.
Front facade with ipe wood slat siding, standing seam metal roofing and central "factory window"
Front view of ipe wood facade, standing seam metal roofing, central "factory window"
Fachada
Steep street. Original garage door and wooden louvers.  New third floor glass louvers.
The evening view of the glass louvered studio below with the roof deck.
The pines to the west of the home provide protection from the wind.
The upper volume is clad in stained black cedar, while the lower volume is built with concrete.
Photovoltaic panels have been installed on the sloped, south-facing volume.
The architects have installed ample glazing along the south facade, particularly on the lower level, to take advantage of solar gain in the winter. The concrete floors also help retain heat.
Casa Gaz seen at night with a closed entrance gate.
Casa Gaz stands out from its neighbors with its facade clad in vertical timber.
Concrete walls dominate the ground floor, while the first floor is clad in Ipe. "The upper-level white walls and Ipe wood ceiling gives the same contrast, but in a more peaceful way for the sleeping quarters," Gracia notes.
The thin roof extends over the east side of the entry hall, while a series of skylights allow natural light to pass through. The entrance is on the west side of the glazed entrance.
The steel-framed glazed living pavilion is partly clad in wood and sits atop CMU walls.
"The east façade reveals these distinct parts of the house—the grounded bedroom volume to the north, the glass hallway, which offers a glimpse to otherwise secluded outdoor spaces, and the living pavilion that is lifted above the site to view the forest and pond," the team adds.
The "living pavilion" on the southern wing is elevated to make the space level with the home.
The private bedroom and service rooms are located at the northern street corner and are clad in concrete masonry units.
Thanks to a complete revamp, this midcentury gem now has a fresh new look.
Although Silver did not follow the original footprint exactly, the new layout was clearly inspired by Hemenway's design.
The back deck provides the perfect spot for entertaining and enjoying the lush landscape.
The wood and stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that complements the existing home's midcentury style. The hidden side windows (by the planter) allow natural light to filter in.
The home is approached from the south with views of Hood Canal below.
The entry is marked by a thin, cantilevered canopy hovering over the front porch.
The dark cladding helps recede the simple, boxy home into the lush forest.
The southern and eastern elevations are mostly left opaque to provide privacy from the nearby access road.
Large windows punctuate the north elevation to pull views of the the water and landscape indoors.
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.