357 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

A post and beam entry plus a delicate brise soleil make up the entrance to 572 W Santa Elena Road.
The dramatic home features a striking black and white facade.
Wave House | Olson Kundig
Wave House | Olson Kundig
Wave House | Olson Kundig
At 16,700 square feet, the home is a lot to behold—but the streamlined palette makes it easier to take it all in.
The Ramada House in Tucson, Arizona, is one of Chafee’s most recognized designs. In 1983, she became the first woman from Arizona to be named a fellow at the American Institute of Architects.
Heritage hemlock, purchased from Old Order Mennonites, clads one of the facades. "The whole [aging] process takes about three years to get the boards into the position where they have turned gray enough," says Bocken.
The property was a serendipitous find by architect Nicholas Ancerl and a development partner, who were driving through the quaint streets of Parkland. The new facade features black house numbers from Gingers, loft-style windows from Kingshore Windows & Doors, and antique brick from King Masonry.
In Toronto’s West End lies Sorauren 116, one half of a dual residential development that was completed over an arduous, three-year period by architects from Ancerl Studio.
The one-story homes blend seamlessly into the background due to a palette of basalt, cement, and imported African wood.
The barn makes extraordinarily efficient use of timber milled from on-site trees.
Bark gives the exterior walls a  textured appearance and allows them to blend into the forested surroundings.
The asymmetrical roof has a steep side and a low pitched side.
The architects used smaller bits of oak as wooden shingles for the roof.
Annemariken and Geert sourced old oak trees from their estate to build a barn that provides space for storage, working, and a car port.
The 15-foot windows provide breathtaking views of the surrounding hills and blue ocean waters.
The 12 homes are for-sale and rented throughout the year to tourists. When POLO Architects first become involved with the project, they wanted to make sure that the designs would be "as viable and sustainable as possible," POLO Architects Co-founder Patrick Lootens says.
For Mount Washington Residence, McBride Architects use prefabrication to save on costs while going big on functionality and style.
Originally designed in 1939 by Roscoe Hemenway, the Burton House was once home to famed artist Verne Tossey, who was best known for his campy pulp fiction book covers throughout the 1950s and 60s. Recently, Portland-based designer Benjamin Silver and builder Oliver Olson have completely renovated the home, transforming the property into a modern interpretation of Hemenway's original design.
Designed to comfortably accommodate three to five employees, the 1,000-square-foot home office by Matt Fajkus Architecture complements an existing midcentury abode. The addition includes two individual office spaces, a conference room, a studio, a bathroom, and storage space. An operable wall divides the main space as needed. The wood-and-stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that jives with the existing home's midcentury style.
The firm took inspiration from early barns in the area. “They’re very lightly built here because we don’t have snow,” says Haesloop. “So then the eaves are very tight. There are no overhangs. So, we were interested in using the Equitone to fold down to the land.”
This view shows the two forms backed by the Cypress trees. The main social areas are to the right, and the bedroom cube is to the left.
Windows wrap the length of the wall in the main section of the house and overlook the green space. “It’s a very unusual setting for the Sea Ranch—and Kieron, who’s from England, absolutely loves it because you get these beautiful big green meadows,” says architect Eric Haesloop.
“We wanted to create a house that did justice to the incredible landscape of the Sea Ranch, and also to its immediate surroundings—a combination of bright open space looking toward the ocean, but also an area that was sheltered and shaded by a gorgeous stand of Cypress trees,” say the couple. “We also wanted to preserve and honor the tradition of Sea Ranch architecture—Kieron is a huge history buff, and he had started reading about the origins of the Sea Ranch build paradigm, as well as the utopian ideals upon which it was founded in the 1960s.”
Taula House by M Gooden Design  |  Exterior // Library
Street view
Wide glass apertures connect the living and dining room to the new backyard.
The “knuckle” connects the public and private spaces with the meadow on one side and the oak grove on the other. The space between the volumes is as carefully considered as the architecture itself.
Cantilevered out over the hillside the residence, which also serves as the couple's primary residence, is threaded between the trees, anchored by its concrete foundation which stops just short of the tree’s roots.
The gabled structure peers out from the dense oak grove to the meadow below.
The cypress pine–clad terrace warms the cooler texture of the board-formed concrete and galvanized steel exterior siding.
Sliding doors and screens can be opened to connect the house to its wooded environment or closed to provide privacy from passersby.
The timber-clad home is nestled into the lush foliage of the existing landscape.
Designed in 1950 for a teacher named Foster, this unique two-bedroom midcentury known as the Foster House was one of the architect's earliest residential commissions.
The contemporary home's gabled roofline and timber materials are a nod to the traditional alpine vernacular.
The Z House's structure consists entirely of concrete. Wood screens wrap around the sides, and Prefa materials top the roof.
The complexity of the very steep, rock-studded site was a big challenge for the architects. Here is an image of the west side of the house, where the service areas, garage, and entrance are located.
Law Estates Wines spans 55 acres with full panoramic views of the Paso Robles countryside. The building reflects that of their varietals—showcasing natural characteristics in minimalist style. The design is a direct response to the natural materials of the site, its hillside topography, and climatic influences of the sun and wind.
A modest, gabled 1965 hut on the outskirts of Guatemala City was transformed into an expansive 4,467-square-foot getaway. Blurring the indoors and out, architect Alejandro Paz adhered to the original architectural elements while adding modernized touches. The roof maintains the same angle as the original hut, but reversed, while new modules give the space a new identity. With floor-to-ceiling glazing, the home allows for the residents to take in the Guatemalan forest from all angles.
External area, integrated to the house by balcony common to all rooms, has swimming pool and deck. Casa Di Irena furniture. Deck run by Lovato Marcenaria
A view of the Z House illuminated at night.
Deep roof overhangs not only protect the interior from direct sunlight, but also provide privacy.
The house is designed to step down the sloped site. Over time, the larch screens will develop a gray patina and create a cool contrast with the warm-toned interior wood.
“The approach path is one of the key points of the project. The arrival is a precise and inevitable sequence: the road climbs steeply, the house shows itself from afar in the middle of other buildings, then hides, and then reappears in a scenic perspective from the bottom where you can feel the whole size of the building,” says GEZA.
Surrounded by 1.2 acres of flat land, the contemporary residence is designed to frame a unique, long view of Los Angeles—as well as the mountains beyond.
“Most homeowners would tear the whole thing down and start fresh,” says Brillhart. “But it made for a much more interesting project, preserving a little bit of Russell’s legacy and then adding two new wings on each side of the building.” An Ipe fence now lines the front of the property, and the two-story wing can be just glimpsed through the trees on the left.
The expansive estate sprawls over several terraced levels.
The Richard and Helen Arens House glowing gorgeously at night.
The spacious backyard features a pristine hillside pool and hardscape overlooking panoramic views from the Santa Monica Bay all the way to Catalina.
As Wright’s first L.A. project, the iconic Hollyhock House was built between 1919 and 1921 and was filled with challenges from beginning to end. Enter Aline Barnsdall, the wealthy oil heiress and arts patron who held the dream of having a live-in venue to produce her own avant-garde plays. Wright wanted to create a design that would be defined by the region and that took advantage of Southern California's temperate climate. To do this, each interior space is echoed with an exterior space in the form of pergolas, porches, outdoor sleeping quarters, glass doors, and rooftop terraces that look out to the Hollywood Hills and the Los Angeles Basin.
Slatted Tzalama wood screens provide privacy and light control as well as a pop of contrast against the concrete structure.
Set on an expansive tree-filled lot near Griffith Park in Los Angeles, the residence provides easy parking via three individual, internally accessed garages.
The home taps into solar energy sources and cross ventilation to reduce energy demands.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.