290 Exterior Brick Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The David and Gladys Wright House is considered FLW’s last residential masterpiece.
A view of the guest house, which is included in the sale.
Passive design principles were utilized in the siting of the highly-insulated cabin. Deep eaves protect the interior from hot summer sun, while a verandah overhang optimizes solar gains in winter.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
The clients requested the design of the cabin and shed to appear as if the buildings had been weathering over time with the site.
A bright orange door adds a pop of color to the home.
The backside of the guest house.
Beautifully renovated, the home has excellent curb appeal with low maintenance landscaping.
Main elevation
As its name suggests, the house rests upon wooden stilts, which passively cools the interiors.
Writer Marc Kristal described the house as "a lapidary example of Miesian simplicity: a 25-by-95-foot rectangle, composed of a black exposed-steel frame, front and northern elevations clad largely in white glazed brick, and southern and western exposures enclosed by floor-to-ceiling glass sliders."
A flat roofline and solid post-and-beam construction create the clean lines of this classic midcentury profile.
They built a new, stand-alone work studio, and nestled it within the lower section of the garden to provide a different orientation and perspective to the main house.
The 500-square-foot cabin and adjacent shed are 100 percent off-grid, with water, sewer, and electrical systems in place to support these buildings and any future development.
11 Tallwoods Road in Armonk, NY
Massive wooden fence, which is a stripe, is on the background of a brick house, which is a square.
Hide&Seek Game. Location of the windows and their size is not designer’s imagination.
However, in this architectural project, you can feel reasonable composition.
The entrance to the apartment after the renovation.
The neighboring garden cottage originally was Randolph’s law office. This space shares a garden with the old carriage house.
Preserved and repointed brick along with repaired exterior trim and a fresh coat of paint breathe new life into the historic home. The roof is asphalt shingle.
Big Space, Little Space preserves the brick exterior.
In the entrance, a team with the general contracting firm Martha uncovered an abstract mural that Engels painted himself and then plastered over. He also made the geometric door handle. Simon speculates that Engels sourced the marble, found all over the house, from Expo ’58, after the pavilions had been dismantled.
Villa Engels, the home of the esteemed Belgian modernist Lucien Engels (1928–2016), was falling apart when its second owners bought it in 2013. Yet due to its heritage status, any changes they planned would have to be approved by the provincial preservation office. Engels completed the elongated, cantilevered residence in 1958, the same year he finalized the master plan for Expo ’58, the Brussels World’s Fair that famously featured the Atomium.
Pereira’s modernist ranch for Firestone combined "the strength of his commercial work with the lightness that desert living demanded." The timeless home still looks every bit as contemporary today as it did when it was originally built.
Dunin and her team repurposed recycled brick to match the original material on the exterior of the home. Brick was also used to build privacy walls that would still bring in light and air.
Tall, slender teak trunks are secured to the ground with the weight of adobe bricks—a material that’s commonly used in the area—to support the walls and roof.
The communal area is fitted with wooden sliding doors, which open to connect the space seamlessly with the surrounding garden.
Windows of varying sizes punctuate the building, giving it a sculptural appearance.
The operable windows help let cooling breezes into the home—a necessity given the area's muggy tropical climate and the urban heat-island effect.
The traditional facade does little to hint at the apartment's modern aesthetic.
Throughout the revamp, charming historical details were kept intact.
A look at the restored front facade of the Federation home. The rear addition can't be seen from the street.
The site is located within the Australian bushland of Willoughby Council's Griffin Heritage Conservation Area, which added another level of complexity to the approvals process and design.
Recycled and repurposed items, such as salvaged bricks and a stainless steel bench from a commercial kitchen, have been used to create a low maintenance and sustainable home.
"We liked the idea of capturing the informality of a holiday place—nothing precious, all simple and practical," explain the architects.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.