83 Exterior Brick Siding Material Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The simple building materials —brick, timber, off-white render, glass, and zinc— and the elevation of the house take its cue from Manor Court.
The architects were looking to create a space that would reflect the client’s eclectic and playful sensibility, while also establishing a connection between the new living spaces and lush garden.
The home appears to glow from within at night.
In 1962, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill architect Arthur Witthoefft won the AIA's highest honor for a home he built in the lush woods of Westchester County. Having fended off a developer's wrecking ball, Todd Goddard and Andrew Mandolene went above and beyond to make this manse mint again.
White brick exterior of Goddard and Mandolene’s home post renovation.
Lush landscaping softens the steep driveway that leads to the garage at the base of the house.
The couple’s garden-style townhouse is one of nearly 200 units that Mies van der Rohe designed for Detroit’s middle class after World War II. Zac Cruse Construction assisted with their remodel.
The ground floor follows an L-shaped plan, and is accessed via a tiered concrete terrace.
The new additions of the home are clad in bespoke cedar profiles that inject a modern flair to the 20th-century brick building.
YUN Architecture carefully restored the exterior of the house with new windows, dormers, and wood frames.
A midcentury property in Palm Springs, California.
The second C folds towards the interior, and takes in the morning sun.
One volume serves as a home for Ortega, his wife and children, and the other, as the home for his elderly parents.
The house is composed of two volumes.
To enable the two families to live independently, and interdependently, Estudio A0 co-founder Ana María Durán Calisto came up with a 5,457-square-foot home that consists of two volumes, set in a Z formation.
A wooden screen provides privacy, and offers protection from the strong midday sun.
Another view of the studio.
Located in Tribeca, New York City, The Raft House is a modern intervention in a traditional New York City residential building.
“The project reverses the traditional suburban pattern of a house centered on its site and surrounded by empty space,” says Beer. Instead of a lawn, it has three courtyards behind a brick wall.
The outdoor spaces and roof deck are impressive and feature a living roof succulent garden.
Setback from the street, this extremely private one level property has sliders with outdoor access, solar panels, and mountain views from every room.
The entrance to the weekend home.
The interior staircases are cut out from the façade to reveal a saw-toothed, hollowed out space on the lower corners of the exterior walls.
The house is composed of six volumes laid out to create a void in the center.
A mysterious-looking staircase leads up to the bedroom.
A home in South Korea designed like a large square box with the form of a small gabled house cut out to create a wide passageway.
The 1,553-square-foot, two-story brick house is sited on a plain and surrounding by houses with different silhouettes.
Originally built in 1952, the Masson House in Pleasantville, New York recently received an addition and renovation by Carol Kurth Architects that honors Frank Lloyd Wright's intent and vision.
Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House (1936, Madison, Wisconsin). This brick and wood abode, built affordably for a family, is an example of indoor-outdoor living—a wall of full-height glazed doors open onto a terrace.
Plantings: Evans + Lighter Landscape Architecture, contractor Sandra Tomasetti, and architecture firm studioWTA collaborated to develop  a roofline without gutters above the walkway and carport. Instead, water is channeled to feed the garden. The result is a California-inspired yard with geometrically laid-out plantings rather than grass. “It’s rows of green with mulch permeating,” Maury says.
Margarita McGrath and Scott Oliver of Noroof Architects termed the 1,650-square-foot house in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, “Pushmi-Pullyu,” in reference to the interior-exterior flow they created. Resident Jill Magid, pictured on her front steps with son Linus, is a conceptual artist; she fabricated the neon house numbers.
Originally conceived as a jewel box that would evoke precious objects and fine woodworking, Architect Natalie Donne envisioned, “a box covered with smooth and black material on the outside and blonde wood on the inside.” Large sheets of lustrous black fibrocement were assembled using fine rivets to form two connecting prisms, complete with large opening glass walls.
“There’s a threshold of planting between the outside and inside,” says architect Laura Briggs, citing the blooming boxes on the sidewalk, the rear deck, and the master-suite terrace (above the bay window).
Fiberglass composite louvers, which Rich can control from the deck, block out views from a nearby college dorm and parking garage.
On a rear addition to an existing suburban home outside of Melbourne, Australia, Austin Maynard Architects designed a brick structure with a series of round windows on multiple facades. The circular windows vary in size and location, giving the building a playful twist, despite its more traditional construction of red brick.
Of the facade, Maury says, “It doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb, but it’s definitely one of the cooler houses in our area.”
Because the house is located in a historic area, the exterior updates were limited to new windows and ipe cladding around the front door.
Though the couple’s house is much younger than its immediate neighbors, it manages to fit right in—adding to, rather than detracting from, the neighborhood’s historic character.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.