59 Exterior Brick Siding Material Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

Setback from the street, this extremely private one level property has sliders with outdoor access, solar panels, and mountain views from every room.
The entrance to the weekend home.
The interior staircases are cut out from the façade to reveal a saw-toothed, hollowed out space on the lower corners of the exterior walls.
The house is composed of six volumes laid out to create a void in the center.
A mysterious-looking staircase leads up to the bedroom.
The couple’s garden-style townhouse is one of nearly 200 units that Mies van der Rohe designed for Detroit’s middle class after World War II. Zac Cruse Construction assisted with their remodel.
A home in South Korea designed like a large square box with the form of a small gabled house cut out to create a wide passageway.
The 1,553-square-foot, two-story brick house is sited on a plain and surrounding by houses with different silhouettes.
Originally built in 1952, the Masson House in Pleasantville, New York recently received an addition and renovation by Carol Kurth Architects that honors Frank Lloyd Wright's intent and vision.
Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House (1936, Madison, Wisconsin). This brick and wood abode, built affordably for a family, is an example of indoor-outdoor living—a wall of full-height glazed doors open onto a terrace.
Plantings: Evans + Lighter Landscape Architecture, contractor Sandra Tomasetti, and architecture firm studioWTA collaborated to develop  a roofline without gutters above the walkway and carport. Instead, water is channeled to feed the garden. The result is a California-inspired yard with geometrically laid-out plantings rather than grass. “It’s rows of green with mulch permeating,” Maury says.
Margarita McGrath and Scott Oliver of Noroof Architects termed the 1,650-square-foot house in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, “Pushmi-Pullyu,” in reference to the interior-exterior flow they created. Resident Jill Magid, pictured on her front steps with son Linus, is a conceptual artist; she fabricated the neon house numbers.
Originally conceived as a jewel box that would evoke precious objects and fine woodworking, Architect Natalie Donne envisioned, “a box covered with smooth and black material on the outside and blonde wood on the inside.” Large sheets of lustrous black fibrocement were assembled using fine rivets to form two connecting prisms, complete with large opening glass walls.
“There’s a threshold of planting between the outside and inside,” says architect Laura Briggs, citing the blooming boxes on the sidewalk, the rear deck, and the master-suite terrace (above the bay window).
Fiberglass composite louvers, which Rich can control from the deck, block out views from a nearby college dorm and parking garage.
On a rear addition to an existing suburban home outside of Melbourne, Australia, Austin Maynard Architects designed a brick structure with a series of round windows on multiple facades. The circular windows vary in size and location, giving the building a playful twist, despite its more traditional construction of red brick.
Of the facade, Maury says, “It doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb, but it’s definitely one of the cooler houses in our area.”
Because the house is located in a historic area, the exterior updates were limited to new windows and ipe cladding around the front door.
Though the couple’s house is much younger than its immediate neighbors, it manages to fit right in—adding to, rather than detracting from, the neighborhood’s historic character.
Another 1956 tract house with a flat roof designed by Krisel.
Main elevation
Eastern facade
All of the glazing along the house’s 95-foot-long western elevation can be opened to the out of doors.
White brick exterior of Goddard and Mandolene’s home post renovation.
In 1962, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill architect Arthur Witthoefft won the AIA's highest honor for a home he built in the lush woods of Westchester County. Having fended off a developer's wrecking ball, Todd Goddard and Andrew Mandolene went above and beyond to make this manse mint again.
The Damianos’ house, located in Denver’s Highland neighborhood, runs completely on solar 

“To be able to respect the ‘massiveness’ of the roof, making bigger windows would be wrong, because we would lose the character of the farm,” Wynants explains. “Therefore, I was looking for other ways to collect light. At this spot you had the big barn doors at both sides: This is the economical axis of the farm. This I kept, as my own design office is right under this volume. It keeps the sun out, so I have a splendid view when I’m working—I never need sun shades.”
Web developer Rich Yessian involved local preservation groups early and often to gain permission to unite home, office, and outdoors at an aged warehouse that, according to Sanborn Maps, predates the Civil War.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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