92 Exterior Hipped Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

Japanese practice Kengo Kuma and Associates teamed up with Suteki America to build the Suteki House for the 2017 NW Natural Street of Dreams residential construction showcase in Oregon. The home "envisions a new mode of suburban living by combining Japanese spatial principles and a nature-based, American way of life," according to the architects.
A view of the back of the structure, highlighting both the long entry staircase and solar panels on the straw roof.
Completed in 2020, the Illusion Villa is perched in the Eriksberg Wildlife Park. It offers visitors the opportunity to go off grid and reconnect with nature.
The home is connected to a series of five unique outdoor spaces, hence its name: Five Yard House. Each yard takes a different approach to the landscape. The front lawn that faces the street is very orderly and manicured, and it maintains the appearance of the traditional neighborhood. “At one point, we debated a contemporary design for the steps leading up to the front porch—just to hint at the changes happening beyond,” says architect Miguel Rivera. “In the end, however, we decided it was best to adhere strictly to the historic nature of the district.”
The home boasts numerous outdoor spaces, many protected from unpredictable rain showers.
Interior designer Ginger Lunt revives a 1954 residence that she fell in love with as a young girl growing up in the tropical forests of Mount Tantalus.
"By replacing the low-value, original garage and workshop, space was created within the original building envelope to create a three-bed, one-bath guest wing above," says DFJ Architects. This new wing is on the same level as the main residence and "is keyed into the existing roof pitch," so it fits seamlessly into the neighborhood.
The hexagonal backyard studio that Marlin and Ryan Hanson, of Hanson Land & Sea, designed and built in British Columbia, Canada, is clad with western red cedar shakes and a metal roof.
Architect Johan Sundberg looked to Japanese architects like Kengo Kuma for inspiration for the design of a holiday home in southern Sweden. "We call it the Katsura typology, but that's probably sacrilegious," he says. The eaves of the gently sloped hipped roof extend generously in all directions, turning the deck into a covered retreat that’s part veranda, part engawa, the Japanese version of a porch.
Folding doors create an indoor/outdoor experience.
The indoor/outdoor quality of the modest residence was inspired by the cinematic quality of the natural surroundings.
Pared back to the basics, Litibú allows the landscape to guide its narrative.
The palapa roof is a nod to traditional Mexican architecture.
The compact retreat in Nayarit, Mexico, that Palma designed for an American couple comprises two stucco-clad volumes connected by a patio. The oculus above the open space frames the sky.
Considering the abundance of biodiversity, lifting the structure off the ground was an ecological measure as much as a utilitarian one.
Underneath the cabin’s pine finish lies a weatherproof membrane—an essential consideration granted the region’s rainy climate.
A hardwood roof ensures that the cabin can withstand wintry snowfalls.
The Impluvium Refuge is set in a dense, tall Chilean forest within the Huilo-Huilo Biological Reserve.
Jeffrey Bokey-Grant gives his family’s traditional cottage an award-winning remodel that adheres to the original footprint. The original brick worker’s cottage is estimated to have been built in the 1920s. "The house had since been victim to neglect and a series of questionable improvements over the course of its life," says Bokey-Grant.
From the street, you can’t even tell there’s an extension in the back: it’s just a quaint cottage with a garden. “You get the best of both worlds,” says Szczerbicki.
“One of the clients’ families has a history of being heavily involved in beautiful vintage wooden boats,” says architect Trevor Wallace. “The timber screen plays off that idea and introduces a very warm, natural material to face the street.” The timber screen wraps around the side window to offer added privacy from the main entrance.
The brick home had a previous addition at the front that was modified during the renovation. “The client was keen on a heavy black aesthetic and we were worried it might feel very heavy, especially as it is the community-facing element of the building,” says architect Trevor Wallace. “So, we lightened it up and made it feel a bit warmer with the timber screen.”
The 1830s mansion that is now Life House Nantucket was originally built by whaler Captain Robert Calder and opened as an inn in 1870.
The hexagonal backyard studio that Marlin and Ryan Hanson designed and built in British Columbia, Canada, is clad with western red cedar shakes and a metal roof.
The house has two distinct wings—the 1885 original "front" and the contemporary "rear." The front part of the home has been restored to the original 1885 floor plan, while the rear of the home was demolished and replaced with a new build that contains the garage, bathroom, and storage on the ground floor, and the boys’ bedrooms on the upper floor.
The Hansons crafted the front door from a single slab of yellow cedar. The circular window in the door mimics a ship porthole and features hand-blown colored glass.
The original home was a parson’s residence built over 150 years ago that had undergone a series of small remodels in the eighties and nineties. This new intervention retained the exterior detail at the front and updated the paint scheme.
A gravel path leads from the dining area to a bridge across the restored creek that runs along one side of the house.
A centuries-old blue oak stands near the intersection of the two wings of the house, which is clad in Alaskan yellow cedar. “We decided to split the house into two volumes to let in light and allow us to be more nimble with where we placed the structures.” Jess Field, the architect.
Says Krista, “We needed to know that whatever we built would not take away from the landscape.”
On a lot studded with old-growth oaks and redwoods and crossed by a creek, Ian and Krista Johnson asked Field Architecture to design a house that would defer to its natural surroundings.
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
Architect Charles Warren Callister designed the one-bedroom unit to take advantage of dramatic views from the property. A double-height glass entry looks out onto vistas including the bay and Belvedere Island.
The glass pavilion rises into a peaked roof, one of the cabin's most distinguishing features.
The home is a traditional, single-fronted Victorian terrace. The architects reinstated many of the original features that were missing from the front of the home before the renovation.
"The exterior is Deep Caviar by Benjamin Moore, but with a slight twist,” says Wei. “In order to create subtle variations throughout this sprawling exterior, I played with the darkness level of Deep Caviar and also changed up the sheen of the paint.”
From the front, this quaint Victorian cottage appears as it always has, hugging the street and alleyway. As you approach, a quiet addition is revealed beyond.
The concrete foundation was poured on top of a rock outcropping, so that the house would feel like part of the natural features of the site.
One of the client’s goals was a low-maintenance home—so there are no gutters or skylights to clean. The angles of the exterior metal envelope allow forest debris and muck to slide off easier. “The house looks after itself in a way,” says senior designer Czarina Ray.
The firm juxtaposed a standing-seam metal envelope with thin strips of cedar on the exterior. “We're playing with the textures on the outside of the house,” says Campos, pointing out that the cedar brings a “human scale” to the industrial nature of the metal.
Sooke House 01 is located on a multiacre lot on the southern tip of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, surrounded by Douglas fir, Sitka spruce, and cedar trees. At the entry, Campos Studio split the roofline to accommodate an existing tree.
At first glance, the structure appears to be a single-story home. The surrounding trees create additional privacy as the yard begins to slope toward the rear.
A rear view of the home showcasing the glazed facade. The upper-level living and dining areas feature large sliders that open up to an expansive deck.
The project name, Summerhouse T (or Sommarhus T in Swedish),  speaks to both the first letter of the client's last name, as well as the T-shape of the home, which was integral to creating indoor/outdoor rooms.
The exterior of the historic residence at 3132 Oakcrest Drive is simple and clean. A sloping roofline follows the topography of the 8,000-square-foot lot.
Aqua Wellness Resort features minimalist cabins on a private inlet of Nicaragua’s Emerald Coast. This is a great place to truly unplug and enjoy “barefoot luxury” in your private tree house.
From the street, the addition and light-filled living spaces remain hidden.  The charm of the traditional cottage remains visible.
This bi-level bungalow's building envelope was increased by only 82 square feet, but now showcases an open-plan kitchen-living-dining area and loads of natural light.
The view from the backyard.
In addition to the home’s interior goals, the exterior was transformed with a modern facade.
Along with the main residence, the property also includes a spacious, detached guest house and three-car garage.
The exterior facade of this San Francisco home displays the colors and lines typical of Piet Mondrian’s paintings.
The distinctive facade references a traditional thatched English cottage.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.