693 Exterior Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

Peering into the breezeway.
The back of the home and gable ends are covered in blackened cedar.
Glass doors and a patio with steps leading down to the pond create a seamless, indoor/outdoor living experience.
A reclaimed hickory wood facade punctured by windows overlooking the National Forest Service land
The bivouac is designed for minimal environmental impact. It's set on non-permanent foundations and anchored to the rock in a non-invasive way, and it can be removed without leaving a trace.
Architect Indra Janda hand-cut sheets of polycarbonate into 15¾-inch square shingles and clad the entire timber structure—a gabled roof and walls—with them. This idea for a backyard shed is a great example of using unexpected materials in a new and exciting way.
The living area holds a table with seating for eight. There is also a sideboard, a surface for food preparation, and ample storage compartments for backpacks and climbing equipment. Two wooden sleeping platforms with mattresses can sleep up to eight people, and small solar panels provide minimal lighting.
The shelter can accommodate eight people.
A small external niche at the entrance helps protect the door from wind and snow and provides a small storage space for gear.
High-quality materials guarantee the shelter's durability, and every piece is recyclable and ecologically certified.
The structure is made from wood and steel composite panels, and it's designed to split into four sections for transport and handling to reduce the number of helicopter flights needed for the final assembly.
The high-altitude, remote site called for simple and efficient construction choices and careful logistical planning.
"The house is totally introverted [and] mysterious towards the street and extroverted towards the interior," says Morini.
Set on an expansive meadow and overlooking the sea, Rode House is a semicircular residence on Chiloé Island featuring a dramatic, sloping roof that extends over an interior courtyard. Pezo von Ellrichshausen is a Chilean firm known for their arresting, geometric architecture. In true form, the striking, semicircular residence boasts a roof that drops steeply to form two sharp peaks at either end.
Extensive glazing and skylights fill the home's interior with natural light.
The house sits within a field of trees.
The house is composed of three separate modules.
Located in the countryside just outside Córdoba, Argentina, La Negrita is respectful of its woodland environment.
One of the modules is a garage.
Cercal House is a minimalist, Mediterranean home that celebrates the Alentejo landscape.
The roof creates a dialogue with the surrounding landscape through multiple sloped planes, irregular lines, and an absence of overhangs. The home's form appears to change according to one's angle of approach.
The Vallée du Parc Residence features a complex, angular roof that echoes the form of the surrounding hills.
“Open views, rolling hills, old barns, perch fences, and wildflowers: every aspect of the site was constantly bringing back this historical fiction of rural Quebec at the beginning of the twentieth century,” explain the architects.
The high gable roofline is a hallmark of midcentury modern architecture.
The entrance to the Orchid Tiny House.
The house is powered by solar panels.
They tiny house connects to the outdoors with clerestory windows, floor-to-ceiling windows, skylights, and a garage door that opens up an entire wall.
To protect against water penetration, the walls and roof are assembled with three-quarter inch pressure-treated OSB sheathing, Typar housewrap, an ice and water shield, asphalt paper, furring strips, and stained penofin cedar.
Inspired by the Scandinavian barn vernacular, this Upcountry Maui cottage provides a peaceful retreat for family gatherings.
Four bedrooms and four bathrooms span two structures, with a guest wing and main residence. The Aspen, Colorado, home is 4,300 square feet.
Designed by Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter for a family of four, the Split View Mountain Lodge is a holiday home near the village of Geilo, Norway. The main volume splits out to form additional annexes that frame individual views of the surrounding mountains.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow shed and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
A shot of the two houses from across the pond. “It's campfires by the pond, dinner cooked in the wood fire oven…we are living the dream,” say the brothers.
A view from the outdoor deck with Jon's house on the right and Nik's home to the left.
At 2,120 square feet, Jon's home (on the left) is slightly smaller than his brother's 2,540-square-foot house (on the right). Though the homes feature different floor plans, each has five bedrooms and three bathrooms.
The exterior terrace, water channel, deck, and window wall of Matt and Jon Andersen-Miller's renovated midcentury home.
The entry is hidden and only discoverable through a pathway that leads to a red sculpture. It's the only part of the palette that breaks the rules of the monochromatic cloaked facade.
The program is pushed to the property edges to screen adjacent neighbors and directs framed views to a large central courtyard.
Enough House by MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects resides on Brian MacKay Lyons' Shobac farm in Nova Scotia, a campus that allows the firm to experiment with form, materiality, and building. The Cor-Ten steel cabin, which features exposed Douglas fir plywood sheathing and stained pine flooring inside, houses an intern architect.
The base of this cabin is constructed out of cast-in-place concrete with formwork using the same wood as the floor cladding above.
The cabin is surrounded by a thick forest of birch and spruce.
Stairway to Heaven is located on the clients' parents' land, just steps away from the homeowner's childhood home. Two siblings were also building homes on the property, making it a true family compound. The architects were mindful to create a home that utilized the views, but also allowed for privacy between residents.
White concrete panel cladding and corrugated steel roof panels give this cabin a crisp, geometric form that almost melts into the landscape on bleary, snowy days.
Architects Stéphane Rasselet and David Dworkind delivered with a strikingly simple concept, anchoring two stacked, rectangular volumes into a steep mountainside surrounded by awe-inspiring vistas.
An extension of Treehotel’s mission of bringing modern design to a serene natural environment, the 7th room is a cabin lofted among the treetops that blurs the distinction between indoors and outdoors. Designed by the renowned firm Snøhetta, the structure hovers 10 meters above the ground with a black-and-white print of the canopy covering the bottom façade, creating a trompe l'oeil effect.
The restored 17th-century farmhouse in the Baix Empordà region of Spain.
Oozing with charm, comfort, and modern amenities, these 10 micro homes are eagerly awaiting to help you experience the tiny house lifestyle. But brace yourself—you might become an aspiring tiny-house dweller after just one stay.
Weary city dwellers can find serenity in this array of cabins on the Norwegian archipelago of Fleinvær, where the Northern Lights make regular appearances.
Partially sunken into the landscape to reduce its impact on the landscape, the expansive Cercal House can comfortably accommodate 10 people.
This stunning property features unique marble masonry—an element not found in any other Frank Lloyd Wright home.
The 1,800-square-foot barn and workshop was designed by architect friend Yianni Doulis. The exterior employs untreated cedar in a reverse board-and-batten style.
“The existing house was an important house in the heart of the historical district,” architect Robert Gurney said. To honor the property’s legacy, and fulfill the city’s requirements, the firm fully restored the exterior with cedar shingles.
Mono in the woods of Montana
To reduce the load of the trees and minimize the building's impact on the forest, 12 columns support the cabin. One tree stretches up through the net, emphasizing the connection to the outdoors.
Surrounded by boulders and twisted yuccas, these two cabins in the Mojave Desert stand like Monopoly houses, with their steel siding weathered to a tawny finish. But behind the simple gabled forms lies a complex network that enables them to operate wholly off the grid.
Available for as low as $55,000, the Artist Bothy is a multipurpose, prefab hut designed to promote a creative spark in residents.
The winter sun provides some passive solar heating to the south-facing back of the home.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.