597 Exterior Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The Hive was completed in May 2015 for a total construction cost of $160,000.
"It is so beautiful around here with the wildlife and the vegetation—the less disturbed, the better," says Axboe.
The house was designed to seamlessly integrate into its surroundings. It is conceived as a "looking box" to the mountain ranges, with ample outdoor decks and patios to enjoy the views.
Scott and Lauren’s compact backyard home is located in the back half of their 5,000-square-foot lot in the Richmond neighborhood of Southeast Portland.
Wood paneling provides a pop of contrast on the front side of the home. The two-car garage is to the left.
The gardens include a "tiny little forest" that obscures the home from the street level, and a small, oblong pond in the backyard, which is inspired by the shape of a Tylenol pill.
A peek at the surrounding lush landscape.
Materials used for the exterior include stucco, wood, metal, and concrete.
The main entrance to the home is located opposite the door of the outbuilding.
The home also includes a small outbuilding that echoes the main building's monochromatic, gabled form.
The vertical corrugated metal siding mimics the verticality of the trees.
A large cedar deck offers outdoor entertaining opportunities. The outdoor furnishings are by COOP Etabli.
A pathway winds through the woods from the parking pad to reveal the cottage and a raised cedar walkway.
A view of the house from the southeast approach.
Nestled in the woods, Chalet Grand-Pic was completed for construction costs of approximately $227,000.
Since the council wouldn't allow off-street parking or a dedicated crossover, the architects created a "hidden" sliding side gate (seen open in this image) to provide vehicle access if needed.
The exterior door adds a pop of color to the white and gray facade.
Steel columns echo the Norwegian folk form.
The house features a simple gable roof.
A splash band of black Richlite wraps the base of the building to protect the timber siding from the snow and rain.
A look at the exterior of the cabin.
A view of the home from the east side.
The home's simple gabled shape is emphasized by the use of burnished stucco on all sides.
An aerial view.
The property's former Spanish hacienda-style, red-tile roof has been replaced with a contemporary metal one as part of the renovation.
The home sits on a 16,000-square-foot lot which has been beautifully landscaped with rows of cacti and palm trees.
Set on a half-acre lot, this updated 1963 midcentury home is located in the heart of La Cañada Flintridge in the Los Angeles area.
A collage of brightly colored, geometric volumes comprise the Ettore Sottsass–designed residence of Lesley Bailey and Adrian Olabuenaga, proprietors of jewelry and accessories company ACME Studio. Completed in 1997, this home is one of few private commissions designed by the Italian architect, who passed away in 2007.
Manufactured in a factory offsite, the 370-square-foot house can comfortably fit two people.
The 31-foot cabin includes a four-foot spire.
The roof insulation is rigid, waterproof material that Witzling placed on the outside in order to leave the roof framing exposed on the inside. The metal roof has a layer of chicken wire, with moss harvested from the property stuffed into it to create a weathered-looking green roof.
"We took a 1970s kit greenhouse off the west side of the house, which was making the home overheat, and replaced that area of footprint with a covered porch that shades the western glass," Thompson says.
The attention to detail extends to the design of the home's streamlined contemporary gutters.
A look at the dramatic slice in the roof, which provides an exciting intersection between modernism and the vernacular design.
The gable-ended structures reference the agrarian history of the site. Each roof is supported by dark timber and steel trusses, inspired by the property’s existing hay barn.
Nestled between sprawling trees, the property sits on the valley floor, leaving a courtyard space with a pool in the center.
At night, the circular window glows like the moon and illuminates the lower floors much like a light box.
In summer, the living area is surrounded by grass that covers the terrain. Yet, once winter comes, this same area appears to be nestled within a blanket of snow.
The home has warm interiors throughout and boasts a minimalist, cabin-like aesthetic.
The black roof balances upon its rectangular base of light pinewood, creating a dramatic contrast between dark and light.
The home's modern design has been guided by strong geometrical shapes and clean lines.
The classic post-and-beam construction is highlighted on the exterior.
The home is perched beside a two-acre reservoir, a favorite spot for bird watching.
A blackened-timber pergola extends from the modern barn that architect Greg Scott designed for Jody and Deirdre Aufrichtig in the Elgin Valley, an apple- and grape-growing region near Cape Town. Made of narrow slats stabilized with randomly scattered blocks of wood, it  covers roughly half of the outdoor deck.
Here is 6225 Quebec Drive at dusk.
The dormers are clad in a modern zinc siding and jut out from a traditional pitched roof. Here, the Cenia Azul limestone façade feels restrained, yet still fits into the context of the more traditional neighborhood that surrounds it. The stone has been bush-hammered for a lighter finish and an almost suede-like texture, which complements the sleek dormers and custom mahogany windows and doors.
Solid post-and-beam construction gives the home a classic midcentury profile.
The house has a high-pitched, gabled roof.
Because the area lacks distinctive natural features, House 3000 has quickly become a landmark that helps orientate visitors to the site.
The meticulously landscaped front yard is low maintenance and features drought tolerant plants and a sprinkler system.
Passive design principles were utilized in the siting of the highly-insulated cabin. Deep eaves protect the interior from hot summer sun, while a verandah overhang optimizes solar gains in winter.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.