1306 Exterior Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

A view of the historic water feature, which is now integrated into a new patio surrounding the ruin and modern extension.
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A new brick staircase leads up to a rooftop terrace above the new section. A portion of the Victorian home was also remodeled to tie the old and new spaces together.
The disorderly nature of the ruin is juxtaposed against the modern extension and Victorian-era residence. The facade brickwork was largely completed using reclaimed materials, allowing the new section to sensitively blend into its surroundings.
Located about an hour northwest of London in Northamptonshire, a Grade II listed Victorian home was extended to encompass an adjacent cattle barn and historic ruin.
Will Gamble Architects revives a crumbling, 17th-century structure with a svelte addition of steel, brick, and glass.
The cedar-clad tiny house Emma McAllan-Braun and Joel Braun created with Mint Tiny Homes features a pine deck with a stock tank swimming pool.
Architect Timothee Mercier of Studio XM converted a crumbling farmhouse into a residence for his parents.
Located in the urban area of Essen, Germany, the historic Dortmannhof building typifies 18th-century half-timbered hall houses. Pictured is the bright blue front door located on the west side of the building.
The entrance to the home was painted in a uniform, dark blue-gray to visually unify the different elements and make it more contemporary. The existing latticed timber awning was exchanged for a more minimal, robust awning that provides shade and shelter from the rain, and the light fitting above the door was replaced.
Dyer squared-off the bay window to gain space inside the kitchen, making sure to add windows that seamlessly fit with the existing units.
The trapezoid-shaped addition hosts a new master suite on the main level.
The team preserved the deck, but installed a new railing.
At night, the home’s interior is illuminated through the windows and skylights. As a result, the character of the built form is transformed from private and introverted to extroverted.
The dark brick facade peels away into the garage, creating an interior stairwell. The garage door, like the front door, is crafted from black steel.
The warehouse-inspired front door on the southern side of the home is crafted from black steel and features a solid steel screen that slides in front of it, creating a completely blank facade.
The neighboring property has a beautiful, established garden. The gridded windows of the Park Terrace house—which take inspiration from the industrial warehouse archetype—are positioned to capture snippets of this garden, in effect borrowing the landscape. A small terrace has been cut out of the gable form to create a division between the master bedroom and the living area.
The southern facade of the home—the entrance—is a completely blank facade, which gives the home a private aspect, says the architect. The brick facade curves into the interior of the home.
The previous home on the Park Terrace site was damaged in the earthquake and subsequently demolished. Architect Phil Redmond, director of PRau, used this project to explore an archetypal industrial form which was lost as a result of the earthquakes.
The material is in stark contrast to the rough-hewn walls of the original stone structure.
When renovating a centuries-old beach cottage in Cornwall, architect Adam Casey of Watershedd covered one of the existing additions in vertical black timber.
“Corey’s idea of decoupling the boxes into separate units meant we could play with how far forward or back each one was,” says resident Gabrielle Chamberlain.
The cladding is triple-stained black cedar shiplap. The doors and windows are by Andersen.
A multi-gabled house designed by architect Corey Yurkovich for a couple and their longtime friend sits amid beech trees, cattails, and seagrasses on New York’s Shelter Island.
“A conglomeration of boxes around a bit of a pitched roof” is how Mark describes his transformation of the 1920s Los Angeles bungalow. Inverting the traditional layout, he set the private rooms in the front and a large, open living area in the rear.
Landscaping from Piazza Horticultural surrounds relaxed outdoor hangout spots.
A private outdoor shower is located at ground level, for easy access from the beach.
The team relocated the staircase so it doesn’t break up the facade.
Clapboard siding was swapped out for narrow horizontal strips of Meranti wood, and the garage now has barn-style swing doors that fit into the facade.
The bay window was squared off, and the cupola was rebuilt so that the scale works better with the massing of the building.
An outdoor shower on the rear gable of the house is used for rinsing off from the pool or after an outdoor excursion—or for a quick wash down for their two rescue dogs.
The kitchen is located on the east side to receive morning light, while the living room to the west takes advantage of the afternoon and evening light.
“The north and south facades are set back in relation to the wood paneling so that they are perceived as framing.”
The canopy and balcony at the east and west facades are made of galvanized black steel.
When viewed from the rear, the home’s sculptural shape becomes more apparent. “At first sight, the requested pitched roof is not recognizable,” say the architects. “Only if seen in direct elevation, from above or experienced from inside in section it is visible and gives a spatial tension to the whole.”
When viewed from the access road, House L echoes the local vernacular with its pitched, shed-like form.
An old silver fir became a focal point in the design and guided the shape and orientation of House L.
Located in the valley and commune of Gsies, House L is surrounded by mountains and dense forests.
In the daytime, the Polygal system pulls in soft, natural light, while at night there are a rainbow of options. "It has a beautiful quality of natural light during the day—plus it manages UV rays and privacy, and controls glare," says Lori.
One facade features Polygal, a polycarbonate sheet first manufactured in 1970 and now available in various layers, colors, and degrees of transparency. The Polygal used for Trammel House has LED light strips inside, which the Louises play with for holidays and parties.
Jim and Lori Louis’s three-bed, two-bath home in East Dallas came to life because of a unique partnership between the couple and A. Gruppo Architects. "They really listened to our goals, embraced our aesthetic, and honored our budget," says Lori.
Beneath the sharply angled car park of the midcentury house, aqua-colored paint and exposed wood siding give a new look to the existing facade. The design team brightened the front steps with geometric tiles.
The large wood deck features an outdoor shower that helps to provide an indoor/outdoor living experience.
The Cobb Haus, a wood-sided, 700-square-foot cabin in Cobb, California, features a large wood deck surrounded by towering trees.
Nestled among towering fir trees and magnificent dogwoods in Cobb, California—just an hour north of Napa Valley—is the 700-square-foot cabin Hope Mendes recreated as an idyllic family escape. "We’ve always had a dream of owning and renovating a cabin in the woods," Hope says, "a place [where] we could take our kids when we need to get away from the hustle and bustle of our work lives."
This uber-green dwelling not only walks the walk, it talks the talk.
Both ÖÖD Iceland houses have a hot tub at the front overlooking the spectacular scenery. “This makes the experience even more surreal,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The glass front half of the cabin blurs boundaries between interior and exterior and completely immerses guests in the dramatic surroundings.
The cabins overlook the Hekla volcano, one of Iceland’s most active volcanoes. It is part of a 25-mile-long volcanic ridge, and during the Middle Ages it was referred to by Europeans as the "Gateway to Hell.”
The two cabins are named Freya and Alva, and feature the runes for “F” and “A” on the exterior timber wall. Signs from Nordic mythology are also found on the back of the houses. “The viking elements and the runes help the cabins fit into Icelandic history,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The harsh local climate—including strong winds and acid rain caused by the volcanic landscape—was a particular challenge. The cabin features a copper roof, which is one of the few materials that can cope with acid rain.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.