451 Exterior Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The house is composed of three volumes, two of which come together at an angle to capture views of the surrounding landscape.
Exterior view of master bedroom and master bath
Exterior view of main entry
A perpendicular wing houses the garage. The house has no air conditioning, relying on lake breezes and cross-ventilation for cooling. Each bedroom has a screened door that opens to the deck and an adjustable transom above the hallway door to encourage the circulation of air.
The 700-square-foot cabin features a steeply pitched roof that is nearly 23 feet in height.
The cabin is surrounded by a thick forest of birch and spruce.
Taking cue from the original form of the chapel, NIKJOO's transformation brings new life and purpose to the building, while still respecting its remarkable past.
The white board-and-batten facade takes cues from the surrounding stables and is surrounded by billowing grass and birch trees.
The tapered limestone chimney draws inspiration from an existing shed built of dry-stacked local stone.
"The porch’s distinctive 30-foot peak is discernible from a great distance, and its rhythmic, horizontal cypress slats are a contemporary interpretation of traditional vented gables," add the architects.
A waste-management plan has been developed to minimize, mitigate, and/or completely eliminate construction waste, while also properly disposing unused materials.
"Working within the restrictive budget, design was not sacrificed; rather, it inspired the team to find a vocabulary that was simple yet refined," adds the firm. "The exterior of the home is defined by clean lines, a sculptural gable roof, and a contrasting material palette of corrugated-aluminum and warm, locally sourced cypress. "
The historic site consists of an old farmhouse, stable, and shed, along with bunkers and artillery foundations from the both World War I and World War II. The stable has been converted into a modern 5,683-square-foot bed and breakfast establishment called The Bunkers.
Incisions made in the façade amplify the contrast between the red and yellow brickwork.
Streamlined sections of metal-framed windows with triple glazing stylishly connect the brick and wooden volumes.
For the farmhouse residence, the team has removed all the elements that did not have any significant heritage value. "Valuable historical constructions are thus brought into equilibrium with the scarcely added volumes," says Damiaan Vanhoutte, a co-founder of the firm.
The original farmhouse structure has been revamped into a 5,038-square-foot house for the owners of the B&B.
The gabled addition is topped with a standing seam metal roof and is clad in vertical corrugated metal siding.
A study is placed on the street-facing side of the addition.
"Stitching the existing white weatherboard cottage into its more robust industrial surrounds, the new addition uses brick work painted white at the first level to connect to the white weatherboard and then black at the top level to engage with the local industrial precinct," say the architects.
"Stitching the existing white weatherboard cottage into its more robust industrial surrounds, the new addition uses brick work painted white at the first level to connect to the white weatherboard and then black at the top level to engage with the local industrial precinct," say the architects.
Each prefabricated unit is covered in aluminum but built from SIPS (Structurally Insulated Panels) that consist of thick insulation sandwiched between plywood panels. These high-performance panels keep the interior protected from the desert's ambient heat.
"The gabled forms embrace the context of the surrounding post-war weatherboard houses, and the white polycarbonate directly references the white weatherboards of the dwelling to the north," say the architects.
From this angle, all three buildings can be seen, two of which are clad in wood. The foremost building is wrapped in white polycarbonate.
Constructed with wood and Perspex acrylic glass, this semi-transparent volume extends from the side of the main house, blurring the boundaries between indoors and outdoors.
This creates the appearance of a singular gabled house with opaque walls on one side and transparent walls on the other.
The width of the greenhouse volume is equal to the width of the enclosed  volume. "The greenhouse portion and the residential portion are structurally independent while complementing each other's functions," says Snark architectural director Yu Yamada, "enabling expansion, reduction, and renewal of the greenhouse section in the future."
The home is accessed from the west, where the garage is hidden behind a charred timber door.
The master bedroom overlooks the landscape through a glazed gable wall, which is shaded with a deep overhang.
The gutter is concealed to preserve the home’s minimalist appearance.
Large windows and terraces connect the home to the outdoors.
Red ALPOLIC aluminum composite panels have been used for the exterior cladding.
Scott and Lauren plan to track the energy use of their new-build’s electric equipment and appliances. The data will inform the size of their photovoltaic array they'll add to offset the energy costs of the ADU and the bungalow.
The FSC-certified Western Red Cedar siding, supplied by Sustainable Northwest Wood, was lightened and will develop a darkened patina over time.
Scott and Lauren’s compact backyard home is located in the back half of their 5,000-square-foot lot in the Richmond neighborhood of Southeast Portland.
The living space seamlessly connects to an outdoor patio with seating.
Thanks to a complete revamp, this midcentury gem now has a fresh new look.
Although Silver did not follow the original footprint exactly, the new layout was clearly inspired by Hemenway's design.
The back deck provides the perfect spot for entertaining and enjoying the lush landscape.
The wood and stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that complements the existing home's midcentury style. The hidden side windows (by the planter) allow natural light to filter in.
With its courtyard and walled garden, the abandoned structure was once part of a larger Irish estate that included an early 19th-century home.
The north-end of the cabin features an outdoor deck.
The prefab cabin is elevated atop six metal pillars to minimize site impact.
The prefab cabin is a 40-minute hike from Kandalaksha.
Energy-efficient VELUX windows have been installed in the south-facing glazed wall.
The first task at hand was to open up and vault the ceilings. The architects added floor-to-ceiling windows, which allowed the home to take full advantage of its amazing views.
The cabin is located in Hvalfjörður, Iceland, just a 30-minute drive from Reykjavík, and can only be accessed by car. The area is remote, private, and quiet, making it ideal for viewing the Northern Lights at night, as well as hiking during the day.
In addition to the hot tub, there is also a 129-square-foot outdoor terrace on site with a small table and two chairs for al fresco meals.
Lovely lines and heaps of character make this midcentury property a true gem.
Cut out of the walls at different heights, these doors reveal the unusual and quirky interior arrangement of the chalet.
A large pitched-top door, and a small pitched-top window are cut out from each of the four sides of the chalet’s exterior walls.
The roof is composed of a single sheet of folded stainless steel, and features a gutter on one side for rainwater harvesting.
The chalet is built entirely out of Jura forest Fir wood planks.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.