180 Exterior Gable Roofline Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

A view of the extension at night.
The pitched roof reduces the extension's surface area to 12 percent less than that of a flat-roofed extension, creating a more compact building envelope—which translates to less material needed for construction and less space to heat or cool.
Floor-to-ceiling glass with sliding glass doors allow access to the decked outdoor space, covered by the roof's overhang.
In order to meet the project's requirements for both affordability and sustainability, Warc Studio paired glass with laminated timber fins constructed from arsenic free H3 treated laminated radiate pine—a highly sustainable resource locally-sourced from a nearby plantation.
The gabled roof on Enough House puts it in conversation with the adjacent Troop barn and Cheboque schoolhouse, but its Cor-Ten steel exterior makes it a unique addition to Shobac.
"In the western facade of the building the individual characters of the different units are most obvious, while in the eastern facade (seen here) their coherence and the cabin as a whole is more prominent," write the architects.
Another view of the back of the building.
The Greenmoxie tiny house project is 340-square-feet, sustainably built , and can be completely off-the-grid. Completely customizable their prices start at $65,000.
The familiarity and warmth of the burned finish juxtapose the more contemporary fritted glass that wraps around the corner of the building.
The pitched, low-slung roofs of the kitchen and annex allude to their utilitarian function.
The addition is clad in contemporary-looking fritted glass and shou sugi ban—rustic charred wood—by Delta Millworks. Both materials contrast with the historic stonework of the original building.
With invisible foundations, the house appears to hover above a grassy carpet.
A small porch on the southern facade leads down to the lake.
In summer, trees help to filter out some of the heat during the warmer days.
The Pine Plains, New York, home of Elise and Arnold Goodman boasts 48 windows, the largest of which measures 8'6'' by 7'6''. As architect Preston Scott Cohen explains, the "free facade makes it impossible to identify how many levels there are, or even to tell the difference between a door and a window." Photo by: Raimund Koch
The facade of a house in Belgium consists of "knitted bricks."

“In this part of Belgium, 90 percent of the houses are built with brick,” says architect Tom Verschueren. “It’s a classic material that we tried to use in House BVA in a totally different way.”
“I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the French country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half. The result: a house that looks like it’s just been dropped into a field, casual, with nary a path leading up to it and a front door that can barely be detected on the red-cedar-shingled facade.
The client can enjoy the outdoors day or night via the screened porch and deck.
According to the architects, the screened porch panels (on the left) were site-built by the contractor to have similar dimensions as the Marvin windows (to the right). Dramatic black sashes unite the facade. Thin mull covers between window units blend with the exterior siding, "which afforded a consistency that we were after," said Wiedemann. Native stone on the foundation is similar to old Virginia farmhouses.
A view of the back side of the two-story home reveals its dramatic glazing, which provides both levels with far-flung views into the site.
The exterior form and materials of the house echo historic farmhouses in the area, while the garage, clad in red board and batten, evokes old barns. Wiedemann reinterprets the function of a traditional cupola here, which was typically used to aid interior ventilation, by inserting a whole-house fan in this one.
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Anka Lamprecht and Lukas Wezel shared their rustic domicile in a valley in Grotli, Norway. Boasting an enviable view, it’s the first cabin archived in the book’s “Backcountry” category that features homesteads in the wilderness.
A study room that opens to the green backyard.
An updated modular prefab in Norway's in the Snarøya peninsula.
A renovated prefab in Norway.
A house in Suffolk County with concrete foundational walls, charred siding siding and VMZinc zinc roof.
The house’s materials are also influenced by Bavarian-alpine traditions — mainly larchwood in form of tongue-and-groove boards for the façade and as shingles on the roof.

Photo by Sebastian Schels
Good wood - Alpine living in style… introducing the delectable ‘Chalet Anzerre’ in Anzerre, Switzerland by Dutch architects SeARCH.
Additional glazing was added to the structure to increase the natural light.
The main house is a converted barn.
.There are 21 solar panels on the roof of the former cartshed (on the left).
A house has a barn-like profile in Amagansett, New York.
Charred cypress siding by ReSwan Timber Co.
“The stable/garage was built with two intersecting gable roof forms," Schaer says, which didn't match up with the inteiror spaces within. “In order to provide a unified, singular main space, we dropped a flat ceiling at the entrance and linked it up with the main gable visible from the street.”
The resort-like residence has midcentury modern influences, with a strong tropical vibe.
The home has a strong relationship with the land that is in harmony with the tropical environment.
At 939 square feet on the main floor, the
The facade’s historical details were preserved and painted Gunmetal by Benjamin Moore.
The project was reconstructed from an old houseboat that was anchored in the sailing club in Smichov.
“Floating Farmhouse” in Eldred New York is a modern five-room holiday rental home with a touch of old world charm.
This beautiful property located in West Flanders, Belgium has an impressively rich history. Built in 1839, the buildings were used as a fort, watch point and jail house, while some brick and concrete bunkers on the property date back to WWI.
Large glass walls installed within a column and beam structure brings in plenty of sunlight, and frames spectacular views for Airisto.
Iniö has a high-ceilinged terrace, and is fitted with generous floor-to-ceiling windows in the living room and dining area that bring in plenty of natural light.
A wood trellis offers coverage and marks the entry to this 700-square-foot cottage ADU.
Horizontal larch cladding was used for the façade to give the house an interesting ribbed texture with deep grooves.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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