413 Exterior Gable Roofline Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The winter sun provides some passive solar heating to the south-facing back of the home.
The approach to the front door.
According to the architects, the screened porch panels (on the left) were site-built by the contractor to have similar dimensions as the Marvin windows (to the right). Dramatic black sashes unite the facade. Thin mull covers between window units blend with the exterior siding, "which afforded a consistency that we were after," said Wiedemann. Native stone on the foundation is similar to old Virginia farmhouses.
A view of the back side of the two-story home reveals its dramatic glazing, which provides both levels with far-flung views into the site.
The Mono structure's single-engineered truss frame makes it capable of withstanding harsh weather—from heavy snow, to downpours, to heat. It also comes in three variations.
The Greenmoxie tiny house project is 340-square-feet, sustainably built , and can be completely off-the-grid. Completely customizable their prices start at $65,000.
The natural slope of the site was perfect for dividing the house into split levels. The exterior is clad in heat-treated pine that has aged to a soft gray, which contrasts nicely with the charcoal bricks.
Stairway to Heaven is located on the clients' parents' land, just steps away from the homeowner's childhood home. Two siblings were also building homes on the property, making it a true family compound. The architects were mindful to create a home that utilized the views, but also allowed for privacy between residents.
Dubldom presently offers five different models that range from 280-square-foot studios to 1,400-square-foot, three-bedroom dwellings that work well for families.
An architect and construction engineer couple build a sustainable, 624-square-foot abode for $221,580 in their Southeast Portland backyard.
Perched atop a mountain on over six acres of woods, this young couple's weekend getaway incorporates the old with the new.
The trailer is set on wheels, so the home is easily relocatable, and can be registered as a caravan.  A power drill winds the slide-out inward and outward.
The Sojourner tiny house was built atop a high-quality, galvanized trailer chassis.
3767 Barrington Drive features a classic Eichler profile and an inviting bright orange front door.
“Even when the Kirio system is not connected to the router, it’s constantly downloading information about energy usage.” —Tiffany Bowie, architect
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
The solar panels on the roof often get covered in a heavy layer of snow, but with periodic clearing, they are as effective during the sunny days of winter as they are during fairer weather.
The architects reused and enlarged the steel frame and ground slab to preserve the shed’s original form while cladding the structure in new materials sympathetic to the rural vernacular.
The building is clad in horizontal shot-blasted larch boards and vertically oriented galvanized steel fins. The cladding varies in height and width to create a patterned facade.
Walls of glass run up the east and west sides of the house, blurring the boundary between indoors and out.
The sedum green roof by Skygarden helps to manage stormwater.
A bright-yellow “R” sign, from a truck that used to deliver furniture from Jens Risom Design, sets off the southern facade. When Jens designed the house, he stipulated that he wanted cedar shingles, not the asphalt ones that came with the original design from the catalog.
On the north-facing facade, it’s easy to discern where the original glass doors used to open directly to the deck. In spring of 2012, Block Island contractor John Spier replaced the entire wall of glass panels.
Originally, glass doors opened to the deck, but after years of gusty winds, it was decided that a side entrance, protected by a sliding steel door, would be the preferred entrance.
Mid-century designer Jens Risom's A-framed prefab family retreat, located on the northern portion of Block island, is bordered by a low stone wall, an aesthetic element that appears throughout the land.
A look at the lovely nature-filled backyard.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
The home is composed of limestone masonry and structural steel accents.
Designed by architect Tanja Rytkönen, Vista is a compact log home with a high pitched roof, and fully glazed façade.
Designed by architects and experienced sailor Kari Leppänen, Honka’s Saari villa was built with 134-milimeter thick square logs treated with a dark finish, and has three-meter wide eaves that provide shade, and wind protection for the outdoor patio.
This house has a sauna and four bedrooms, including a master bedroom on the second level that looks down onto the lake.
A Honka model called Kommodori was used for this seaside home,
A shark-skinning shack.
The father of architect Greg Dutton wished to build a cabin on the family farm, located within Appalachian Ohio and home to 400 heads of cattle. Dutton, of Pittsburgh and Columbus, Ohio-based Midland Architecture, presented this design as his father’s birthday present in 2012. Finished in 2014, the 900-square-foot cabin operates entirely off-the-grid.
“I wanted more of a skeletal look for this house, and less of a chunky, log-cabin look,” says Panton, who added stark steel bracing across the entire length of the porch’s roof structure.
Nice modern cabin
The family retreat abuts a rocky cliff in Herfell, Norway. The central cabin provides communal living spaces, while the two cabins that flank it are used as private sleeping quarters.
Every year Marlboro College, which is located in rural Vermont, hosts the Marlboro Music Festival in which 80 of the most prominent classical musicians join together and work to hone their craft. For seven weeks, they work, live, and rehearse together and also host select public performances. Since its inception in 1951, the program has steadily welcomed more people to participate, outgrowing its accommodations. Enter architects Joan Soranno and John Cook of HGA who developed five site-specific cabins that tread lightly on the land and respect the festival's roots. Soranno and Cook created deceptively simple-looking structures that update the regional vernacular. 

"In Marlboro, you get a different way of not only looking at the world, but also looking at life," stated Mitsuko Uchida, the festival's current artistic director, in a release. "If you spend weeks together, day in and day out, eating meals together, chatting and sitting around, you begin to get the basic outline of what it means to be a musician. Ultimately Marlboro is about the concept of time. We have time to rehearse and time simply to think."
The sleeping cabin perches on a rocky rise near the Floating House; Meredith imagines these two as a start of a string of buildings that will wrap around the island.
With one side of the house closed off, views are directed through the glazed south and west facades to the grassy clearing beyond. "We planted tens of thousands of blue bells and lots of rhododendrons," Oostenbruggen says of the green space. "The setting developed over time."
A shed provides storage for the owners’ tools as well as wood for the fireplace. It features the same aged pine finish as the main home.
Building atop the foundation of a previous greenhouse was a cost-cutting measure; it allowed the project to be considered a renovation and thereby qualify for a temporary tax reduction. Its traditional, gabled form also pays homage to the original structure.
Anka Lamprecht and Lukas Wezel shared their rustic domicile in a valley in Grotli, Norway. Boasting an enviable view, it’s the first cabin archived in the book’s “Backcountry” category that features homesteads in the wilderness.
Iniö has a high-ceilinged terrace, and is fitted with generous floor-to-ceiling windows in the living room and dining area that bring in plenty of natural light.
Project Name: Island House

Website: http://www.2by4.nl/language/en/
Project Name: ModHaus

Website: http://eastcoastmodern.ca/
Classic post-and-beam construction and a bright orange door create a sunny facade for this updated Orange County Eichler.
The exterior of The Great Barn.
The garage door was replaced with a new entry to the building, featuring a custom steel canopy over the front door. The door is painted Benjamin Moore Flamingo's Dream to better contrast with the black-stained, tight-knot vertical cedar siding.
The architects worked with the natural, six-foot slope of the site and built the Granny Pad into the hill to gain the needed interior height. The volume on the right is the original garage footprint, which now houses a kitchen and sitting room. The added volume on the left hosts the bedroom, as well as a bathroom beneath the loft space.
The architects expanded the building to a total of 571 square feet. The rear entry, shown here, accesses a loft space that is currently used for storage. In the future, the loft might become an office or additional sleeping quarters, depending on the homeowners' needs.
The new homes complement the existing residential scale in this downtown Orlando neighborhood.
From the garden level, a staircase leads up to the protected courtyard where the entrance door is located.
The garden "basement" level houses two guest rooms, a sauna, and a bathroom.
Concrete and wood create a two-toned exterior.
Australian spotted gum wood was used for sections of the exterior wall.
Tim Sharpe and Rani Blancpain wanted a home that would allow them to enjoy an indoor-outdoor lifestyle.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.