1018 Exterior Gable Roofline House Design Photos And Ideas

Landscaping from Piazza Horticultural surrounds relaxed outdoor hangout spots.
A private outdoor shower is located at ground level, for easy access from the beach.
The team relocated the staircase so it doesn’t break up the facade.
Clapboard siding was swapped out for narrow horizontal strips of Meranti wood, and the garage now has barn-style swing doors that fit into the facade.
The bay window was squared off, and the cupola was rebuilt so that the scale works better with the massing of the building.
An outdoor shower on the rear gable of the house is used for rinsing off from the pool or after an outdoor excursion—or for a quick wash down for their two rescue dogs.
The kitchen is located on the east side to receive morning light, while the living room to the west takes advantage of the afternoon and evening light.
“The north and south facades are set back in relation to the wood paneling so that they are perceived as framing.”
The canopy and balcony at the east and west facades are made of galvanized black steel.
When viewed from the rear, the home’s sculptural shape becomes more apparent. “At first sight, the requested pitched roof is not recognizable,” say the architects. “Only if seen in direct elevation, from above or experienced from inside in section it is visible and gives a spatial tension to the whole.”
When viewed from the access road, House L echoes the local vernacular with its pitched, shed-like form.
An old silver fir became a focal point in the design and guided the shape and orientation of House L.
Located in the valley and commune of Gsies, House L is surrounded by mountains and dense forests.
In the daytime, the Polygal system pulls in soft, natural light, while at night there are a rainbow of options. "It has a beautiful quality of natural light during the day—plus it manages UV rays and privacy, and controls glare," says Lori.
One facade features Polygal, a polycarbonate sheet first manufactured in 1970 and now available in various layers, colors, and degrees of transparency. The Polygal used for Trammel House has LED light strips inside, which the Louises play with for holidays and parties.
Jim and Lori Louis’s three-bed, two-bath home in East Dallas came to life because of a unique partnership between the couple and A. Gruppo Architects. "They really listened to our goals, embraced our aesthetic, and honored our budget," says Lori.
Beneath the sharply angled car park of the midcentury house, aqua-colored paint and exposed wood siding give a new look to the existing facade. The design team brightened the front steps with geometric tiles.
This uber-green dwelling not only walks the walk, it talks the talk.
The gable decoration is a Viking element traditionally used to protect homes from danger. The “moon” shape comes from the shape of Viking horns.
Built from simple materials and quietly fitting into the landscape, the family home is a reflection of its bucolic surroundings.
The home is functionally modular, suitable for one person or the whole family. When they travel to the property alone, the clients are able to access just the master suite, while keeping the rest of the home closed off.
The home’s more sheltered faces are clad with humidity-treated pine paneling in a bold, dark hue.
Micro-corrugated zinc sheets were used on the areas most exposed to rain and wind, treated so that the finish was rusty, but not uniformly so. "After many tests I did in my house, I managed to find a technique to oxidize the material and achieve the patina we were looking for," says Sánchez.
"The materiality and the look of the house had to have the identity of Chiloé," says Sánchez. Corrugated zinc panels clad the home’s exterior, zinc being the chosen material which "covers 90% of the houses in Southern Chile."
The home is built with minimal disturbance to the landscape, perched on piles which mitigate the slope of the site.
Designing to attract the least possible attention, Sánchez ensured that the home respected its environmental and cultural context.
A key directive in the home’s design was that "the materials were all from the island, and all very simple," says Sánchez.
In designing the home, "a very important factor was the study of the construction in the area, both in materials and orientation, especially due to the weather," explains architect Baltazar Sánchez. "The conversations with the locals were very important."
“The result is an unusual, simple, and monochrome architecture exploring the purity of the square,” note the architects.
The project’s only splurge was the installation of Shalwin tilt and turn aluminum windows, which cost twice as much as standard windows.
The property slopes approximately 25% from the main road to the lake.
The Poisson Blanc home is topped with an economical white-painted steel roof and clad in standard white-painted pine.
Designed and constructed over the course of two years, the three-bedroom holiday home is oriented to face the lake and slightly angled toward the south to optimize solar gain.
The clients’ one-acre property is located right on the edge of Lake Poisson Blanc, a large water reservoir. “It feels very quiet, isolated, and tranquil,” says Rasselet of the remote area. “It’s an extraordinary place for kayaking and fishing.”
Determining the structural integrity of the original brick dairy was paramount to the design of the new addition perched above. The existing brick walls, footings, and roof structure were all assessed, and steel features prominently in the extension to ensure stability.
The home is located in Martis Camp in Truckee, California, north of Lake Tahoe.
Nestled within a forested site, the home is the perfect getaway for a family and their relatives and friends.
The Lookout House was constructed over a span of five years from start to finish.
As evening sets in, the home glows like a lantern.
The black-stained wood that clads the south faade contrasts with the glass on the north façade and blends with the color of the tree trunks that pepper the natural landscape.
The architects nestled the home into a fold in the topography so that the western facade grips the land, and the eastern facade cantilevers over a small slope. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">The house’s angled roofline mimics the wooded hillside behind it.</span>
Inspired by historic American farmhouses, this modern dwelling is sited at the base of the Rocky Mountain Foothills in West Boulder, Colorado. Designed by Surround Architecture, the 6,800-square-foot property features a unique layout that makes the best use of its one-acre site, while also responding to its long driveway access.
The library pop-out also provides cover for the back door.
An expansive, elevated deck creates a more graceful connection to the house.
The architects installed a new front porch. Fifty percent of the original roof framing was kept with a new standing-seam metal as a cover.
Now the facade is distinguished by bright yellow and soft gray paint, and oversize windows.
Ada, a second design by Norske Mikrohus, measures 205 square feet and is set on wheels.
Vilde is a 237-square-foot tiny home designed by Norske Mikrohus, an Oslo, Norway–based design-build firm.
"Our primary focus is to offer quality tiny homes at an affordable price," says David Reiss-Andersen, who cofounded the Oslo, Norway–based tiny home company Norske Mikrohus with his wife Jeanette, who’s also the firm’s lead designer. "There’s growing awareness of compact living, minimalism, and sustainability," David says. "We want to help provide people with the freedom that comes with living with fewer things, lower costs, lower energy use, and less waste."
The living space extends out into the small backyard through large bifold doors. Horizontal weatherboards and vertical Mini Orb steel cladding creates a graphic, minimal rear facade that contrasts with the surrounding inner-city environment.
From the rear laneway, the parapet and veranda awning echo the original pitched roof, carrying the essence of the old house through to the addition.
The original building had been painted red and the client initially wanted to expose the old brickwork. After removing the paint, however, it was discovered that the entire facade was coated in tar. As a result, the decision was made to repaint the facade in cream. The new volume is hinted at by the portion of black framing that is visible at the side of the home.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.