43 Exterior Gable Roofline Brick Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The 500-square-foot cabin and adjacent shed are 100 percent off-grid, with water, sewer, and electrical systems in place to support these buildings and any future development.
The traditional facade does little to hint at the apartment's modern aesthetic.
The site is located within the Australian bushland of Willoughby Council's Griffin Heritage Conservation Area, which added another level of complexity to the approvals process and design.
Recycled and repurposed items, such as salvaged bricks and a stainless steel bench from a commercial kitchen, have been used to create a low maintenance and sustainable home.
"We liked the idea of capturing the informality of a holiday place—nothing precious, all simple and practical," explain the architects.
"Upon arrival, you enter straight off Abbott Kinney into a calm room where members check in," Sutherland says. "The interior is simple, elegant, and inviting."
The historic site consists of an old farmhouse, stable, and shed, along with bunkers and artillery foundations from the both World War I and World War II. The stable has been converted into a modern 5,683-square-foot bed and breakfast establishment called The Bunkers.
Incisions made in the façade amplify the contrast between the red and yellow brickwork.
Streamlined sections of metal-framed windows with triple glazing stylishly connect the brick and wooden volumes.
For the farmhouse residence, the team has removed all the elements that did not have any significant heritage value. "Valuable historical constructions are thus brought into equilibrium with the scarcely added volumes," says Damiaan Vanhoutte, a co-founder of the firm.
"Stitching the existing white weatherboard cottage into its more robust industrial surrounds, the new addition uses brick work painted white at the first level to connect to the white weatherboard and then black at the top level to engage with the local industrial precinct," say the architects.
A view of the new front door. "At the second level, brickwork gradually opens up to become a perforated brick screen for the roof top deck," explain the architects.
"Stitching the existing white weatherboard cottage into its more robust industrial surrounds, the new addition uses brick work painted white at the first level to connect to the white weatherboard and then black at the top level to engage with the local industrial precinct," say the architects.
The first task at hand was to open up and vault the ceilings. The architects added floor-to-ceiling windows, which allowed the home to take full advantage of its amazing views.
Lovely lines and heaps of character make this midcentury property a true gem.
Given the simplicity of the house’s brick façade—a seven-foot brick base with a massive gabled roof on top—the complex spatial geometry of the interiors comes as a surprise to visitors.
The owner—a ceramics artist—wanted to make the best of the topography of the lot, and also requested views of the site's nearby horse arena.
“I wanted to do a house that belonged on the site,” she says.
The new additions of the home are clad in bespoke cedar profiles that inject a modern flair to the 20th-century brick building.
This 19th century workshop in the Netherlands was converted into a cool, modern apartment.
Additional glazing was added to the structure to increase the natural light.
The main house is a converted barn.
.There are 21 solar panels on the roof of the former cartshed (on the left).
A school in Rotterdam that was built in 1912 was converted into six apartments.
The contrast between the old, dilapedated brick structure and the new, smooth Corten steel create a balance between the old and new.
This beautiful property located in West Flanders, Belgium has an impressively rich history. Built in 1839, the buildings were used as a fort, watch point and jail house, while some brick and concrete bunkers on the property date back to WWI.
The brick exterior of the main house.
Faux timber doors, painted black, along with a brick facade help the dwelling blend with its surroundings: the Victorian homes of the Moseley neighborhood in Birmingham, UK.
© Vojteck Ketz courtesy of Marta Nowicka & Co.
Wynants grew up sailing, and he created the piece to suggest “a moment of togetherness...the way one might gather at the back of the boat, to talk and drink.” A side view of the house captures a glimpse of what he calls “the monolith.”
“If you want to respect the old, the contrast should be brutal. I want to be very clear what is old and what is new.” —Dirk Wynants
By setting an Amsterdam house a few feet back from the street, 31/44 Architects ensured the city’s planning department that the new construction would not block light to the surrounding structures. The gray brick facade references the building material of choice in the formerly industrial neighborhood, which has seen a residential resurgence.
Designers Russell Pinch and Oona Bannon kept many of the architectural details of the 300-year-old cow barn they turned into a second home, including its terra-cotta roof tiles. The primary structural change took place on the front facade, which they tore down and rebuilt, opening space for a traditional oeil-de-boeuf window. The door on the left opens to a workshop. In addition to designing furniture, the couple also create interiors for select clients.
The house features one master bedroom upstairs, two guest bedrooms, and two separate guest apartments downstairs that Wynants rents out. “Farming has become a very difficult trade. Prices are historically low and agritourism is something invented to give farmers the possibility to have an extra income,” says Wynants, who grows hops on his land. “The formula has had huge success; in the last years the tourism capacity of this area has multiplied many times.”
“To be able to respect the ‘massiveness’ of the roof, making bigger windows would be wrong, because we would lose the character of the farm,” Wynants explains. “Therefore, I was looking for other ways to collect light. At this spot you had the big barn doors at both sides: This is the economical axis of the farm. This I kept, as my own design office is right under this volume. It keeps the sun out, so I have a splendid view when I’m working—I never need sun shades.”

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.