115 Exterior Gable Roofline Cabin Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

Designed by architect Tanja Rytkönen, Vista is a compact log home with a high pitched roof, and fully glazed façade.
This house has a sauna and four bedrooms, including a master bedroom on the second level that looks down onto the lake.
"In the western facade of the building the individual characters of the different units are most obvious, while in the eastern facade (seen here) their coherence and the cabin as a whole is more prominent," write the architects.
Another view of the back of the building.
A small porch on the southern facade leads down to the lake.
In summer, trees help to filter out some of the heat during the warmer days.
The Pine Plains, New York, home of Elise and Arnold Goodman boasts 48 windows, the largest of which measures 8'6'' by 7'6''. As architect Preston Scott Cohen explains, the "free facade makes it impossible to identify how many levels there are, or even to tell the difference between a door and a window." Photo by: Raimund Koch
“I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the French country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half. The result: a house that looks like it’s just been dropped into a field, casual, with nary a path leading up to it and a front door that can barely be detected on the red-cedar-shingled facade.
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Anka Lamprecht and Lukas Wezel shared their rustic domicile in a valley in Grotli, Norway. Boasting an enviable view, it’s the first cabin archived in the book’s “Backcountry” category that features homesteads in the wilderness.
The house’s materials are also influenced by Bavarian-alpine traditions — mainly larchwood in form of tongue-and-groove boards for the façade and as shingles on the roof.

Photo by Sebastian Schels
Good wood - Alpine living in style… introducing the delectable ‘Chalet Anzerre’ in Anzerre, Switzerland by Dutch architects SeARCH.
At 939 square feet on the main floor, the
The deep fissure through the end gable of the home was due to settlement of sand below the ground, but it also gave the home its distinctive character.
The newly constructed wing consists of a combination of stones from existing walls on the property, wood siding, glazed panels, and a new roof.
Large glass walls installed within a column and beam structure brings in plenty of sunlight, and frames spectacular views for Airisto.
Iniö has a high-ceilinged terrace, and is fitted with generous floor-to-ceiling windows in the living room and dining area that bring in plenty of natural light.
Innauer Matt Architekten designed the house as simple wooden building resting atop a solid, reinforced concrete plinth.
Originally, glass doors opened to the deck, but after years of gusty winds, it was decided that a side entrance, protected by a sliding steel door, would be the preferred entrance.
Built by a crew of three, the home makes a virtue out of being unfussy and straightforward. The north-facing glass wall under the gable, with a triple-glazed facade, doesn't require shading or insulation. The quick-to-build structure—which consists of just structural insulated panels (SIB) made from OSB panels with a foam core, and a concrete floor that retains heat—doesn't include any complicated systems or require much maintenance.
The north wall of the IST home functions as a cut-away, offering a peek inside an efficient yet cozy dwelling. Architect Peter Jurkovič built the home for a woman who had sold her flat in the big city of Bratislava and wanted something that reminded her of the village life of her childhood.
The roof is anodized aluminum and, thanks to the wooden cladding, the Bunkie blends nicely into its forested surroundings.
These rustic roof beams were also recovered from the barn and support a covered patio at the rear of the Bunkie.
Located about 100 miles north of Toronto, the Bunkie overlooks the Lake of Bays and is adjacent to the client’s house. This Bunkie is clad in wood reclaimed from a barn. A patio extends outwards, enabling the client to exercise outdoors when weather permits.
This particular project, at 300 square feet, required some modification to meet building codes. Nevertheless, it took only a week and a half to build on site.
The two-tone corrugated metal cladding helps the sheds blend into the landscape, along with windows custom-colored by the manufacturer to match.
Located in Germany’s Upper Bavarian Inn Valley this holiday home by architects Christine Arnhard and Markus Eck is only 3.3 foot wide. Half-offset, interconnected stacked rooms are spread over the interior volume, and doors to the property’s two floating terraces can be opened to connect the interiors with the outdoors.
The result: a house that looks like it’s just been dropped into a field, casual, with nary a path leading up to it and a front door that can barely be detected on the red-cedar-shingled facade.
Nestled in a forest of tall pines in the Stockholm Archipelago, the exterior of this island home is clad entirely in folded black sheet metal. Three glazed sliding doors with hardwood frames provide entrances and direct access to the outdoor areas.
Project Name: Island House

Website: http://www.2by4.nl/language/en/
Project Name: ModHaus

Website: http://eastcoastmodern.ca/
Through the decor and amenities, El Capitan campground resort provides a measure of comfort and pampering—from healthy Saturday night dinners to a variety of wellness treatments. Smell the wild sage in the early spring blossoming. Observe the monarch butterflies mud-puddling in the fall. Listen to the frogs all year round. There is something for each season. Feel the ocean breeze, see and hear the rhythmic waves. This is a personal encounter with nature at El Capitan Canyon resort.
“We did our best to tuck the buildings into the site—the goal was to get up high on a perch. It was a matter of setting that elevation and working back down with the topography.”—Riley Pratt, architectural designer

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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