289 Exterior Gable Roofline Metal Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The trapezoid-shaped addition hosts a new master suite on the main level.
The team preserved the deck, but installed a new railing.
At night, the home’s interior is illuminated through the windows and skylights. As a result, the character of the built form is transformed from private and introverted to extroverted.
The dark brick facade peels away into the garage, creating an interior stairwell. The garage door, like the front door, is crafted from black steel.
The warehouse-inspired front door on the southern side of the home is crafted from black steel and features a solid steel screen that slides in front of it, creating a completely blank facade.
The neighboring property has a beautiful, established garden. The gridded windows of the Park Terrace house—which take inspiration from the industrial warehouse archetype—are positioned to capture snippets of this garden, in effect borrowing the landscape. A small terrace has been cut out of the gable form to create a division between the master bedroom and the living area.
The southern facade of the home—the entrance—is a completely blank facade, which gives the home a private aspect, says the architect. The brick facade curves into the interior of the home.
The previous home on the Park Terrace site was damaged in the earthquake and subsequently demolished. Architect Phil Redmond, director of PRau, used this project to explore an archetypal industrial form which was lost as a result of the earthquakes.
This uber-green dwelling not only walks the walk, it talks the talk.
Both ÖÖD Iceland houses have a hot tub at the front overlooking the spectacular scenery. “This makes the experience even more surreal,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The glass front half of the cabin blurs boundaries between interior and exterior and completely immerses guests in the dramatic surroundings.
The cabins overlook the Hekla volcano, one of Iceland’s most active volcanoes. It is part of a 25-mile-long volcanic ridge, and during the Middle Ages it was referred to by Europeans as the "Gateway to Hell.”
The two cabins are named Freya and Alva, and feature the runes for “F” and “A” on the exterior timber wall. Signs from Nordic mythology are also found on the back of the houses. “The viking elements and the runes help the cabins fit into Icelandic history,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The harsh local climate—including strong winds and acid rain caused by the volcanic landscape—was a particular challenge. The cabin features a copper roof, which is one of the few materials that can cope with acid rain.
The gable decoration is a Viking element traditionally used to protect homes from danger. The “moon” shape comes from the shape of Viking horns.
Two cabins sit in the vast, empty landscape overlooking the Hekla volcano, around three hours’ drive from Reykjavík. The front part of each cabin—for sleeping—is almost entirely glass, while the rear—where the living, kitchen and bathroom spaces are located—is clad in timber for privacy.
ÖÖD offers a range of “mirror houses”—tiny prefab cabins that are often used as guest houses, countryside getaways, and Airbnb accommodations. So far they’ve built projects in 12 different countries, including Estonia, Finland, and Norway. The ÖÖD Iceland home is a bespoke design, based on the clients’ wishes and strict local building requirements. These impacted everything from the dwelling’s structural properties and energy efficiency to the pitched roof.
Built from simple materials and quietly fitting into the landscape, the family home is a reflection of its bucolic surroundings.
The home is functionally modular, suitable for one person or the whole family. When they travel to the property alone, the clients are able to access just the master suite, while keeping the rest of the home closed off.
The home’s more sheltered faces are clad with humidity-treated pine paneling in a bold, dark hue.
Micro-corrugated zinc sheets were used on the areas most exposed to rain and wind, treated so that the finish was rusty, but not uniformly so. "After many tests I did in my house, I managed to find a technique to oxidize the material and achieve the patina we were looking for," says Sánchez.
"The materiality and the look of the house had to have the identity of Chiloé," says Sánchez. Corrugated zinc panels clad the home’s exterior, zinc being the chosen material which "covers 90% of the houses in Southern Chile."
The home is built with minimal disturbance to the landscape, perched on piles which mitigate the slope of the site.
Designing to attract the least possible attention, Sánchez ensured that the home respected its environmental and cultural context.
A key directive in the home’s design was that "the materials were all from the island, and all very simple," says Sánchez.
In designing the home, "a very important factor was the study of the construction in the area, both in materials and orientation, especially due to the weather," explains architect Baltazar Sánchez. "The conversations with the locals were very important."
Many of the windows face the herb garden.
The light bronze aluminum finish of the protruding window frames were inspired by traditional farm windows that typically feature bright colors.
A rooftop terrace tops the tallest building.
"The idea is that everything within the circle is designed and man-made and all that is outside the circle is this ‘listed’ nature, the landscape," explain the architects of the circular pathway that surrounds the buildings. "The circle functions as an edge, that is also a place. A boundary between landscape and garden. It places the house and garden in the landscape. A place to have a deep breath of fresh air after a busy day. The clients told us that the circle is used almost daily to move around the house. It’s very interesting to see how people appropriate the design and how they give new meaning and attributes."
The barn-shaped pair of gabled buildings flank a taller volume for visual contrast. The grass mound conceals a passageway that connects the two buildings on the right.
The Dutch ‘hoeve’ informed Villa Vught’s material palette of dark bronze anodized aluminum cladding that wraps both the facade and the roof in a nod to the corrugated iron rooftops of nearby farm buildings.
Referencing the farmhouse typology ties the building into its agricultural setting, while helping the project’s various functions—a residence, cooking studio, and guest suite—read as a unified whole across 7,352 square feet.
A section out of the central living pavilion was cut out to create an angled deck with a pergola. This angle allows the windows to be true north and creates an interesting feature.
A green wraparound fascia and staggered windows provide a quirky welcome and set the tone for The FUN House.
A seamless deck at the central level extends the living areas. The house is orientated directly to the east to maximize daylighting and views.
The home is elevated above a carport, which can also be used as a covered semi-outdoor living space in the summer.
The dark blue facade is punctuated by a single cedar-clad wall that faces the deck and forms a timber nook that is protected from prevailing winds.
The majority of the house is clad in inky blue metal—a durable, low-maintenance material.
The Thornton House sits on a steep site in Brooklyn, Wellington, New Zealand, with a small footprint of just 50 square meters.
A terrace (with a lawn for the children and dog to play on) runs the full width of the living space and is accessible through large glazed doors.
The materiality of the cabin blends into its wooded surround.
Sliding cedar screens treated with the traditional Japanese shou sugi ban method are layered with the Cor-Ten steel siding of the exterior.
The architects situated the cabin between two old-growth oak trees so as not to disrupt the natural features of the site.
When the glass doors are pocketed, an entire corner of the building disappears and there's a feeling of being outdoors while working or spending time inside the cabin.
Glass pocket doors slide away, opening the cabin to its wooded surround. Bluestone pavers on the exterior contrast with the warm tone of the Cor-Ten steel siding.
The front, street-side view of the home reveals little about its true design.
The black roof and siding is all galvanized sheet metal painted black.
Inspired by a haystack, Chalet Jelovac was designed to have a “good visual, spiritual, and physical connection” with its natural surroundings.
The fence references the vernacular architecture of the region.
The home’s materials were chosen to blend into the surroundings and to give the home a timeless feel.
The large front window serves to frame the landscape. It can be also completely closed with “mega wooden shutters.”
The facade was made by local craftsmen, and all of the shutters are custom made.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.