330 Exterior Green Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

The green roof over the one-story living area blends the home into the bushland.
A bridge connects the home’s two volumes, which are divided between private and public spaces. The private spaces are protected through a series of screens and shading devices, while the main public living spaces are fluidly open to the outdoors.
Approaching the home from above, guests encounter a green roof that feels united with the landscape beyond. The entry sequence presents purposefully framed views that hide and reveal the lake.
A two-story, timber volume holds the private areas while a one-story concrete pavilion is more social and communal. Large openings blend indoor and outdoor spaces while allowing coastal breezes to become part of the home environment.
A green roof helps the home blend into the surrounding landscape, and a long skylight illuminates the kitchen below.
The steel bridge—which echoes the design language of the steel brise soleil—extends from the second-floor study into the rear garden.
The deep brise soleil shades the interior as well and offers privacy from neighboring buildings without compromising the views.
Both the boys' bedroom and family room spill out into the ground floor garden, providing the children with an expanded play area outside of the house.
The two monolithic walls on the north and south sides are integrally colored, steel-troweled plaster. They anchor the home in its site as well as provide privacy from neighboring homes.
The home has large areas of glazing on the east and west facades. Given the small footprint of the home and the open floor plan, the entire interior experiences direct light in the morning and evening.
There is now continuous, stepped landscaping from one home to the next as the buildings and street rise up the hillside.
This Sydney home was designed to be an emblem for climate-conscious design. Aspiring to create a self-sustaining mini ecosystem, the architect-owner embraced clean and renewable energy with a facade of photovoltaic panels, a garden rooftop, and myriad green details.
Designed by Austin, Texas–based studio Andersson-Wise Architects, the 12,500-square-foot Stone Creek Camp is sited on a sloping hill whose topography guides visitors to discover the grounds slowly: from the gatehouse to the master house, main lodge, and guesthouse. The eco-friendly family retreat features a stacked wood facade that was built from fallen trees found on the site; a sod green roof that provides insulation; and regionally sourced construction materials—including stone, wood, windows, and doors.
A metal roof is adorned in moss that was found on the property.
The exterior of the cabin is clad in hand-split cedar shakes that were salvaged from another structure on the property.
The walls flare out at 30-degree angles, which creates more space for counters and seating inside the cabin.
The house that architect Clinton Cole designed for his family contains its own partial ecosystem. An underground cistern collects rainwater, which a pump system—powered by solar panels on the facade—carries up to an aquaponics pond on the second floor, where a school of edible silver perch swim.
At night, the home glows in the middle of the Norwegian wilderness.
Wide stairs lead to an open veranda that divides the family wing from the guest quarters. In another nod to rural Scandinavian style, the roof is covered in sod. “When the grass waves in the wind, it softens the rectilinear nature of the house,” says Casper.
The house is raised on columns to improve sight lines, keep snow drifts at bay, and lessen the building’s impact on the land.
Borrowing from the local vernacular, they clad the structure in skigard, a split-rail construction traditionally used for farm fences.
Designer couple Casper and Lexie Mork-Ulnes created a rustic retreat for their family on a mountaintop 45 minutes from Lillehammer, Norway.
A sitting area in the front yard encourages neighbors to stop by for a chat.
The home's green roof is an ode to the life of Arango's grandmother.
The compact residence, sided with tarred pine and glass, is surrounded by the Andes mountains.
Architect Alfonso Arango designed a 258-square-foot retreat with a green roof on the property of his childhood home in La Calera, Colombia.
Ryan Anderson of RAD Furniture designed the stools as well as the table and benches on the pool deck.
When clients approached Mexico City–based architecture firm Estudio MMX, they had a deceptively simple request: a 1,000-square-meter garden on a 1,000-square-meter plot in a neighborhood called Lomas de Chapultepec, west of Mexico City. The problem, of course, was that in addition to a 1,000-square-meter garden, they also wanted a house. Estudio MMX’s solution was to use large terraces to create a garden in three dimensions that connects with the house at every possible opportunity.
The solar panel–topped roofs vary slightly in height for added visual interest.
Tucked away on the edge of a small lake surrounded by mountains and topped off with a grass-covered roof, this hunting cabin designed by Snøhetta is made with locally sourced stones. The 376-square-foot prefab mountain hut sleeps up to 21 guests around a central fireplace.
Niko Architect and landscape firm Ecopochva designed a Moscow home that doesn’t play by the rectilinear rules of conventional architecture. Vegetation blankets the home’s concrete form, and its walls sweep upward and outward to become roofs. Molded floor-to-ceiling windows curve to grant panoramic views of the backyard and swimming pool.
Glass walls and large windows create an airy interior that feels connected to the outside.
The home’s entrance at night.
The green roof is planted with local succulents, including cascading pigface.
A Cor-Ten steel "sleeping volume" seemingly floats atop a predominantly glass "living volume." Intersecting these two stacked volumes is a double-height, timber box which houses the multipurpose spaces.
Bundeena Beach House connects the street and wider community to the water views beyond thanks to its low-lying form and a native roof garden, which the architect describes as a "green infinity edge."
Large timber-framed glass sliding doors open the kitchen/dining space to the rear courtyard on two sides.
The landscape engulfs the strategically positioned home, hiding it from the street and from nearby neighbors.
A glazed section perfectly frames country views amidst the book-lined walls of the home’s sitting room. A mobile panel allows residents to modulate light and privacy as they please.
The home is set amidst the monumentality of the Swiss Alps.
The home extends along a natural ridge.
One of the home’s larch-clad volumes appears to float above the site.
If their everyday mantra sounds something like “reduce, reuse, recycle,” these eco-conscious gifts won’t weigh on their conscience.
A major challenge was dealing with arcane planning requirement that dictated the need for two off street parking spaces. Our solution was to design the front entry path that served as the second “parking” space and was then finished into entry path.
The floor to ceiling glass sliding doors opens the living spaces to the surrounding waterfront and landscape
GO Logic specializes in combining traditional craft with specialized sustainability techniques for building the modern home.
The crumbling stone walls of a 17th-century farmhouse in the remote countryside of Dumfries, Scotland, presented a unique renovation opportunity for Lily Jencks Studio and Nathanael Dorent Architecture, the teams behind this project. Rather than demolish the old walls, they inserted a crisp, modern home within them, so as to emphasize the site's history and passage of time.
The concrete slab roof was made from precast panel forms. "The main roof is also a roof garden completely free from infrastructures such as water tanks and solar panels, which are then located at the rear of the plot, taking advantage of its sloped section," says the firm.
The firm worked to provide as much outdoor access as possible, so the living spaces spill out onto a protected veranda, and a ladder climbs up to the green roof.
The site has beautiful views of a nature reserve at the edge of a stream.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.