409 Exterior Green Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

On the outskirts of Austin, Texas, author Chris Brown and his dog Katsu head to the river; the path was once a dumping ground on top of a long-defunct underground oil pipeline. The green roof was conceptualized by John Hart Asher of the Ecosystem Design Group at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin.
Winkelman Architecture delivers grown-up summer-camp vibes with this unassuming retreat on the coast of Maine.
Inspired by ancient ruins, Frankie Pappas crafts a green-roofed, brick guesthouse that connects deeply with nature in the South African Bushveld.
Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP created a sunken retreat in Karuizawa, Japan. Its glass lookout allows the residents to study wildflowers blanketing the forest floor.
A concrete block tower in the garden beside the home contains a water tank and solar heating boiler with a shower below.
The home requires very little maintenance and features a lightweight construction. The modularity of the design also helped to avoid excessive material waste during construction.
Top 10 Sustainable Homes of 2020: From a carbon-negative cabin to a prefab farmhouse, these resourceful designs captivated readers this year.
The exposed concrete framework cantilevers dramatically from the stone walls.
"In a sense, we treated earth as one of our materials," says Vaitsos. "We figured out how much earth we needed to excavate in order to position this house here. And then we used it to transform the landscape a little bit." This was done to create as little waste as possible.
Each cell denotes a different area inside the house below it and is planted with a different species of aromatic plant from which essential oils can be extracted. The landscaped roof also helps to insulate the home and blend it into the environment.
The circular insertions are custom operable skylights that allow for daylighting and passive cooling.
The Orchard Corral is just below the house, and is home to a large grove of olive trees for olive oil and white wine production. Many of the island restaurants serve the olive oil.
A house in Sydney combats climate change with its own ecosystem.
Clad in salvaged wood and adorned with moss, the tiny hexagonal home has a footprint of 93 square feet.
Home Studio by Manuel Cervantes Estudio #DwellDesignAwards2020
The domino-like residential volumes are staggered on top of each other and feature deeply recessed checkerboard-patterned windows to reduce glare and solar gain. The pavilion is clad in cedar to complement the adjacent stone barn, as well as the property’s heirloom trees.
The pool volume features an 80' x 10' glass facade that slides open to connect the interior to the garden. “Minimizing the amount of deflection of the cantilevered roof at the sliding glass panels to a 10-millimeter max was a challenge,” say the architects. “We had to reinforce and brace the main structural beam greatly to stiffen up the roof, as well as double up our cantilevered beams.”
The structure’s “undulating belly” is exposed above the cave-like pool pavilion. The floors and outdoor paving feature locally sourced Eramosa limestone, a rock unique to Owen Sound.
The undulating wood-and-steel structure is engineered to hide a 90-foot steel structural beam that supports the cantilevered canopy and creates the illusion of a floating pavilion from the front.
The stairs lead up to a green roof that camouflages the building amidst the landscape and protects it from direct solar heat gain in the summer.
The wavy roof cradles a black steel staircase with Eramosa Stone treads that appears to levitate above the ground and leads up to the terrace.
The 338-square-foot Fold House combines a pool pavilion embedded into the hillside with a two-story guesthouse.
Niki Bergen and two of her children run up the hill by the guesthouse she and her partner, Andrew Zuckerman, built on their upstate New York property. The structure was designed by Levenbetts, the architecture firm also responsible for the older main house nearby.
“Our creative process is rooted in a process of questioning and listening, and we design our architecture based on values, not a particular aesthetic style,” says architect Benjamin Iborra Wicksteed. “It is why this home is almost tailor made for our client.”
Working with local professionals, materials, and techniques helped the project stay on budget, as the home was designed and constructed based on resources already present in the region.
Carefully placed windows punctuate the minimalistic walls, creating a sensitive relationship between the interior spaces and the landscape.
The clay used to construct the walls doesn’t just have a structural role— it also creates various textures that help the home blend into the surrounding landscape. To keep within budget, the structure of the home was kept as simple as possible—with the notable exception of the soaring vaulted ceiling in the master bedroom.
“Genius loci is one of our approaches to sustainability,” says architect Benjamin Iborra Wicksteed. As a result of this approach, materials were sourced hyper locally—such as stones from the River Ter.
“We investigated past examples—the works of the maestros who did a similar exercise in investigating and understanding vernacular Mediterranean architecture in order to interpret it to the way of living of their time,” explains architect Benjamin Iborra Wicksteed. “Architects worth mentioning here are Josep Antoni Coderch, Josep Lluis Sert, Lanfranco Bombelli, Barba Corsini, and Antoni Bonet i Castellana.”
“It was very important for both us and the client to touch the natural environment as little as possible—including the trees, land, and vegetation,” says architect Benjamin Iborra Wicksteed. “This is why the house is positioned on the flattest part of the plot, so it doesn’t touch the forest found on the higher part of the site.”
The firm wanted the materiality of the cabin to be "in harmony with the site," says Shaw. "So, that over time, the building could weather gracefully and the site around it would change, and they would do so in tandem."
The materials were kept simple: a foundation of board-formed concrete that reveals the wood grain of the boards used to make it, Cor-Ten steel siding that will develop a characterful patina, and rafters made of hemlock, a local species. "In terms of materials, we wanted the full exterior of the building to be something that would weather gracefully, that required very little maintenance, and that had a long life cycle," says Shaw.
Sited on a rock ledge, the Far Cabin’s screened porch cantilevers over the forest floor for a tree house effect.
The Far Cabin by Winkelman Architecture is set on the forested coast of Maine.
The front fence is made from sandblasted stainless-steel rods coated in a protective penetrating sealer. The fence is cantilevered out from a concrete beam below the garden, and the gate retracts into an underground pit. “It’s the first of its type in Australia,” says architect Tony Vella. “It was a work of precision to have these thin rods slide down into the ground through 30mm holes.”
The home incorporates a number of sustainable features. Glass walls are protected by concrete eave overhangs and automated external sun blinds. In addition, the heavily insulated walls, floors, and ceiling (with roof garden layers) add to the efficient energy performance of the home.
The home is located across from one of Melbourne’s bay beaches, and it needed to easily accommodate the family’s regular beach visits. “From morning swims to summer days on the beach, the home is intrinsically connected to the sun, water, and sand,” says architect Tony Vella.
Levenbetts designed the guesthouse as a porous block. Every side opens to the outdoors, allowing the landscape to continue through the building. “The idea was to create this total openness and informality and almost undomesticated domestic space,” says architect David Leven. The concrete is textured by its forms on the outside but smooth where it cuts into the building—“almost as though you sliced into it with a knife,” Leven adds.
A vegetable garden is on top of the structure. Placing the garden up a flight of stairs—the form of which shapes one of the house’s openings— protects its plantings from hungry fauna.
The residents decided to build with a limited set of sustainable materials; for the facades, that meant wood, bamboo, or cork.
Tucked away on the edge of a small lake surrounded by mountains and topped off with a grass-covered roof, this hunting cabin designed by Snøhetta is made with locally sourced stones. The 376-square-foot prefab mountain hut sleeps up to 21 guests around a central fireplace.
"I wanted the bones of the house to be bold, strong and simple,

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.