31 Exterior Green Roof Material Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The residents decided to build with a limited set of sustainable materials; for the facades, that meant wood, bamboo, or cork.
"I wanted the bones of the house to be bold, strong and simple,
The green roof, wood cladding, and low profile help to integrate the home with its lush, natural surroundings.
The crumbling stone walls of a 17th-century farmhouse in the remote countryside of Dumfries, Scotland, presented a unique renovation opportunity for Lily Jencks Studio and Nathanael Dorent Architecture, the teams behind this project. Rather than demolish the old walls, they inserted a crisp, modern home within them, so as to emphasize the site's history and passage of time.
The horizontal concrete assembly appears to hover gently above the landscape, touching only on supporting columns. Floor-to-ceiling glass provides transparency from outside to inside.
At night, the distinction between site and structure further diminishes as the home’s green roof blends into the land.
Floor-to-ceiling glass walls maintain important view corridors for the occupants.
A vertical skylight asymmetrically divides the folded roof plane while opening the interior of the upper floor to the surroundings.
The wooden lamella detail beneath the gabled peaks makes reference to traditional Warmian-Masurian cottages, which are decorated with wooden boards arranged in various patterns.
From a distance, the grass-covered roof disappears into the native landscape.
A "green line" extends out above the home’s volume and runs along the fold of the gabled roof.
The two structures are connected by green space.
"By reversing the shape of the land and the house, we wanted to think about the relationship between house and nature and notion of form," said the firm.
The home's lower level is submerged in the hillside. The three bedrooms on the upper level have access to the roof terrace.
The 2,026-square-foot house is split into two structures, with an underground garage separating the two halves.
The black-stained wood siding of the Crossfield St House references London’s timber-clad houses from the 17th and 18th centuries.
Although there are numerous Kebony roofs found in Europe and Asia Pacific, a university building in Kansas is the only other prominent North American example discovered by the structural engineer.
Amalgam Studio spent around 18 months building this residence, which merges the indoors and outdoors.
The architects reused and enlarged the steel frame and ground slab to preserve the shed’s original form while cladding the structure in new materials sympathetic to the rural vernacular.
The building is clad in horizontal shot-blasted larch boards and vertically oriented galvanized steel fins. The cladding varies in height and width to create a patterned facade.
Walls of glass run up the east and west sides of the house, blurring the boundary between indoors and out.
The sedum green roof by Skygarden helps to manage stormwater.
"In the western facade of the building the individual characters of the different units are most obvious, while in the eastern facade (seen here) their coherence and the cabin as a whole is more prominent," write the architects.
The building's modern exterior cladding contrasts dramatically with the existing ruins.
Another view of the back of the building.
“Often when we talk about sustainability we focus on the gadgetry, what makes things feasible off grid,” Moffitt says. “But to me there are more interesting things in passive design that rely on the available sun and wind.” An eight-panel solar array does chip in significantly, generating all the electricity the house needs.
A 1.4-kW solar array by Sharp and propane-powered in-floor radiant heating from Radiantec obviate any need to connect to municipal power.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.