38 Exterior Green Roof Material Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The property was meant to fade into its surroundings, which it does at a distance.
A deck on the southside of the home is the perfect place to take in the ocean view.
One end of the home connects to the existing access path, which helped make construction to the site as minimal as possible. Edwards also positioned the property so that a studio space could be built below in the future.
The two ends of the containers can be opened or closed at this pivot for more or less privacy. Native plants will grow on the roof and northside of the structure.
The sloped roof on the loft addition serves as the foundation for solar panels. The South slope of the roof was determined by the optimum solar angel around the solstice, when the sun is strongest, giving Logan Certified its shape and silhouette.
Above the two-bay garage is a guest apartment (approximately 600 square feet.) that features a sleeping alcove, kitchen, bath, living room, laundry area, gas fireplace, and balcony.
The overhang assists in keeping the home cool in the summer, as it blocks some of the sunlight.
The home has a unique industrial aesthetic thanks to the use of eco-friendly structural insulated panels (SIPs) that are prefabricated off-site, manufactured with a minimum amount of waste, and then quickly assembled on the property.
Sleek staggered roof lines, copper clad with green roof tops
The numerous sliding windows also provide the option of passive cooling and an open-air kitchen, living area, and dining area.
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
Japanese architect Takashi Kobayashi of the Tree House People has been declared a “tree house master” by Design Made in Japan. Seamlessly integrating nature and design, this tiny tree house is certainly not just for children.
A concrete box.
A shell of concrete in the desert
Storey calls this house the “Eel’s Nest,” after the narrow urban properties that go by that name in Japan. Its façade was originally going to be wood, but because of local building codes and the fact the building is built along the edge of the property line, the exterior had to be fireproof. Storey covered it with stucco instead. “I wanted it to look as rough as possible,” says the architect. “Since it’s such a small house, it needed to be tough-looking.”

The workshop at ground level measures less than 200 square feet, but is set up to accommodate any kind of woodworking or welding; when not in use, the architect parks his car inside.
Los Angeles–based design partners Taalman and Koch created this house in Pioneertown, California from prefabricated structural components, and included glass walls on which artists later applied surface graphics. Available for rent through Boutique Homes, this 1,100-square-foot house cost approximately $265,000 to build and is composed of a Bosch aluminum framing system and perforated steel decking roof. The interiors floor are equipped with radiant heating and cabinets were built out of Formica or plastic-laminated plywood.
Front facade with cantilevered pergola canopy and shadows
Balancing on irregular, rough-hewn rocks along the Norwegian coast, this renovated summer cabin near a town called Larvik in Vestfold County intelligently navigates a challenging terrain to take full advantage of dramatic views.  
Located just about 16 feet from the sea, Lille Arøya—a 807-square-foot summer cabin—perches on a small, rugged island.  
Oslo-based practice Lund Hagem Architects took on the challenge, drilling solid galvanized steel columns straight into the rock to provide stable support for the house on the uneven ground. They built a new structure that consists of two volumes:a lower post-and-beam volume where the bedrooms and bathrooms are located, and a taller volume with a large, cantilevered roof with wind-bracing gables that serves as shelter for the living, kitchen, and dining areas.  
Glulam beams are used inside and out, and both interior and exterior walls are clad in rough sawn ore pine.  Together with the raw steel columns and white concrete fireplace, the wood defines the color and mood of the interiors. The uniform aesthetic of the cabin's interior and exterior dissolves the threshold between indoor and outdoor spaces—and further connects the structure with its stunning, coastal landscape.
Front yard
Front house night view
The Shayan House takes full advantage of its canyon site.
Shope and his wife carefully designed an eco-friendly landscape: For instance, they did not fell any tree with holes that could support an owl’s nest. They also planted flower species that feed hummingbirds and monarch butterflies. Shope laid out the pathway of reclaimed granite slabs that leads toward the Hudson River below.
The home is embedded in a hillside with five feet of soil above it. In addition to blending the structure into the landscape, the surrounding earth provides natural insulation.
To deter all bird collisions, his home’s Ornilux windows use a specialized inner coating to reflect ultraviolet light visible to the birds but invisible to the human eye.
Poteet describes the space as “unbearably hot” before he used spray-foam insulation between the exterior walls and the interior bamboo. “Now it’s the equivalent of a steel ice chest,” he says.
Edgewood House
Mill Valley, CA
Edgewood House
Mill Valley, CA
One of the main goals of the construction was to do as little harm as possible to the existing environment, which includes waterways that salmon depend upon. Herrin and his team created a garden roof that covers the full extent of the home to meet this objective. “This helps control storm water runoff and also replaces lost insect habitat—insects being a critical food source for juvenile salmon,” he says.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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