61 Exterior Green Roof Material Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The sleeping quarters take advantage of their location at the end of the wings.  They are private spaces with unobstructed views.
Approached from above, the home blends into the landscape thanks to an expansive green roof that's set on SOPREMA elastomeric waterproofing membrane. In winter, the house is disguised under a blanket of snow.
The covered parking pad is supported by an exposed concrete volume with (unseen) built-in storage. The concrete also provides protection against water runoff from the mountain.
Glazed walls allow the interior living areas to be seamlessly connected to the outdoors.
"The wood establishes a very emphatic and directional rhythm that orders the project," says Eduardo Cadaval, one of the firm’s founders.
By creating lookouts in three different directions, residents are able to celebrate the home's unique natural setting no matter which room they are in.
The green roof makes the house look as if it’s camouflaged within its forest surroundings.
While the house was painted black to help it blend in with the landscape, the shrub-covered roof is the more prominent part of the overall design due to the verdant green surroundings.
The walls of the volumes are slightly extended to create sheltered outdoor decks.
Upcycled wood—sourced from fallen trees near the site—was used as part of the shrub-covered green roof.
Concrete was chosen as the primary material because of its high structural performance, low-maintenance, and how well it bridges the slope of the mountainous site.
exterior view of the house
A concrete box.
A sneak peak.
Stone and concrete.
Desertic .
Front view of ipe wood facade, standing seam metal roofing, central "factory window"
The house ontop of the lake
Perched
A staff worker tends to the grass roof.
A glimpse at the breathtaking views available from the home.
The upper volume—where the garage, kitchen, service areas, two bathrooms, and a patio are located—is a half-submerged body of stone set within the upper section of the slope.
An exterior staircases rises along a courtyard-facing wall on one of the volumes, and leads up to a roof terrace that faces a mountain to the east.
The volumes that contain the living room and a guest bedroom were designed with roof terraces, and green roofs cover four of the other volumes.
The elegant retreat combines contemplative spaces with a sense of drama.
Since the home is located in a Class D Seismic Zone, the architects have designed the home beyond code-required structural standards with concrete foundations, steel columns, and composite decking.
A break in the concrete facade reveals the front entrance, which is marked by a thin steel canopy and two chimneys.
To meld the building with the landscape, the architects expanded the aspen grove around the southern approach to the structure.
Master balcony designed to give the experience of being in and living below the canopy of a tree.  The windows are positioned and oriented to allow the ocean breezes to flow through the home
The concrete platforms are set on large black columns, and cantilever over the driveway. Underneath the house is a workshop and parking area.
The sloped roof on the loft addition serves as the foundation for solar panels. The South slope of the roof was determined by the optimum solar angel around the solstice, when the sun is strongest, giving Logan Certified its shape and silhouette.
The outdoor spaces and roof deck are impressive and feature a living roof succulent garden.
The former cement factory's grounds were brought to life with Mediterranean plantings.
Lush plantings espalier the concrete walls of the Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura headquarters.
The exterior of Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura's headquarters.
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
Cor-Ten steel acts as the primary exterior material.  Subtle design features in the steel paneling of the guest wing create notable results; every other panel is slightly offset to create visual and unexpected interest.
The driveway entrance introduces the stately side of the home, displaying clean lines made of concrete and Cor-Ten steel.  Almost every material implemented in this home was done so to create a maintenance-free space that withstands the weather and betters with age.  The design required minimal alteration of the site, a notable accomplishment in land preservation.  To maintain the natural grade, the structure is elevated and cantilevered at the slope, held up by columns which needed only a small amount of foundation work.  The only major land disturbance occurs in the recessed garage, which has been supplemented with a green roof on top to preserve the meadow.
A shell of concrete in the desert
Storey calls this house the “Eel’s Nest,” after the narrow urban properties that go by that name in Japan. Its façade was originally going to be wood, but because of local building codes and the fact the building is built along the edge of the property line, the exterior had to be fireproof. Storey covered it with stucco instead. “I wanted it to look as rough as possible,” says the architect. “Since it’s such a small house, it needed to be tough-looking.”

The workshop at ground level measures less than 200 square feet, but is set up to accommodate any kind of woodworking or welding; when not in use, the architect parks his car inside.
The home’s front façade features an anodized aluminum and glass curtain wall by Kawneer that's framed by Vic West black corrugated metal panels. The board-formed concrete on the exterior enables passive solar absorption, allowing optimal heat retention on cold winter days. The metal and concrete exterior cladding offers cohesive dialogue with the neighboring industrial sheds and commercial buildings.
Shope and his wife carefully designed an eco-friendly landscape: For instance, they did not fell any tree with holes that could support an owl’s nest. They also planted flower species that feed hummingbirds and monarch butterflies. Shope laid out the pathway of reclaimed granite slabs that leads toward the Hudson River below.
The home is embedded in a hillside with five feet of soil above it. In addition to blending the structure into the landscape, the surrounding earth provides natural insulation.
To deter all bird collisions, his home’s Ornilux windows use a specialized inner coating to reflect ultraviolet light visible to the birds but invisible to the human eye.
Villa by the Ocean, 2004, features a long, low profile and a green roof.
From the entrance, the cantilevered structure wraps around to reveal a comparatively more modest side that bows to the mountains and floats on the meadow.
Exterior
Stained cedar, ipe, and concrete form the 2,500-square-foot home's modern palette. Indigenous wildflowers and native grasses grow on top of the structure; this planted roof also helps insulate the home and limited its energy needs.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.