79 Exterior Green Roof Material House Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

The building's modern exterior cladding contrasts dramatically with the existing ruins.
Another view of the back of the building.
Sleek staggered roof lines, copper clad with green roof tops
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
A gullwing door opens to The Sturgis's "obsession space"—a room that can be configured to house whatever the owner can't live without, whether that's a wine collection, mountain bike or motorcycle.
A second green roof is planted with sedum and plays host to one of the family’s favorite spots: a hammock. Bentheim suggested adding a trellis overhead to soften and balance the appearance of the facade.
The house is oriented to maximize views of the ocean and Edgartown to the west, and Nantucket and Cape Pogue Bay to the east. Natural sea grasses sourced from the surrounding area cover the roof of the building, providing thermal insulation while also dampening the noise of rain, improving air quality, and helping to manage rainwater flow.
Native grasses such as red fescue and California oat dot the landscape surrounding the house.
For the green roof, the family received a subsidy administered by DC Greenworks and funded by the DC Department of the Environment. The sedum plantings come from nearby Emory Knoll Farms, the only nursery in North America to focus solely on propagating plants intended for green-roof systems.  The sedum plantings come from nearby Emory Knoll Farms, the only nursery in North America to focus solely on propagating plants intended for green-roof systems.
A living roof is among the project's many green features.
“I wanted to plant a green roof for its thermal mass, but I wanted it to be as natural as possible,” Liang says.
Rian and Melissa Jorgensen's 2 Bar House in Menlo Park boasts all the usual green design suspects: energy-efficient lighting, good insulation, renewable material finishes, radiant heat, and the roof is pre-wired for future PV panels. Still, one of the homeowner's favorite aspect of  green design is the living roof planted with succulents, aloe, viviums, and ice plants.
A green roof blooms atop the detached garage.
Emilio Fuscaldo sits in the garden outside the brick house that he designed for himself and his partner, Anna Krien, on a small subdivided lot in Coburg, a suburb north of Melbourne, Australia.
Cor-Ten steel acts as the primary exterior material.  Subtle design features in the steel paneling of the guest wing create notable results; every other panel is slightly offset to create visual and unexpected interest.
The driveway entrance introduces the stately side of the home, displaying clean lines made of concrete and Cor-Ten steel.  Almost every material implemented in this home was done so to create a maintenance-free space that withstands the weather and betters with age.  The design required minimal alteration of the site, a notable accomplishment in land preservation.  To maintain the natural grade, the structure is elevated and cantilevered at the slope, held up by columns which needed only a small amount of foundation work.  The only major land disturbance occurs in the recessed garage, which has been supplemented with a green roof on top to preserve the meadow.
A concrete box.
A shell of concrete in the desert
Storey calls this house the “Eel’s Nest,” after the narrow urban properties that go by that name in Japan. Its façade was originally going to be wood, but because of local building codes and the fact the building is built along the edge of the property line, the exterior had to be fireproof. Storey covered it with stucco instead. “I wanted it to look as rough as possible,” says the architect. “Since it’s such a small house, it needed to be tough-looking.”

The workshop at ground level measures less than 200 square feet, but is set up to accommodate any kind of woodworking or welding; when not in use, the architect parks his car inside.
Together with a personal Hanse Haus specialist, pre-configured house designs can be adapted simply and easily in order to suit all tastes and specifications.
In the Belgian city of Knokke-Heist, is a school designed by Amsterdam studio NL Architects, which has a turfed pyramidal roof with curving sides atop one of the administrative offices.
Situated on a natural promontory in Coupeaux, France, the home’s plan and expansive windows open it to the beautiful surroundings outside.
The sloped roof of Carlton’s art studio grows a colorful mix of sedum species.
Rooftop Itek solar panels power the community—and are eligible for increased production incentives because they’re made locally. Although the panels were optional, every Village resident chose  to install them.
Front facade with cantilevered pergola canopy and shadows
A hatch door leads to the roof deck, which is lined with artificial turf.
Balancing on irregular, rough-hewn rocks along the Norwegian coast, this renovated summer cabin near a town called Larvik in Vestfold County intelligently navigates a challenging terrain to take full advantage of dramatic views.  
Located just about 16 feet from the sea, Lille Arøya—a 807-square-foot summer cabin—perches on a small, rugged island.  
Oslo-based practice Lund Hagem Architects took on the challenge, drilling solid galvanized steel columns straight into the rock to provide stable support for the house on the uneven ground. They built a new structure that consists of two volumes:a lower post-and-beam volume where the bedrooms and bathrooms are located, and a taller volume with a large, cantilevered roof with wind-bracing gables that serves as shelter for the living, kitchen, and dining areas.  
Glulam beams are used inside and out, and both interior and exterior walls are clad in rough sawn ore pine.  Together with the raw steel columns and white concrete fireplace, the wood defines the color and mood of the interiors. The uniform aesthetic of the cabin's interior and exterior dissolves the threshold between indoor and outdoor spaces—and further connects the structure with its stunning, coastal landscape.
4016 Tivoli at night
4016 Tivoli by day
Detail of computer-cut facade
Front yard
A bridge of steel grating leads to the garage and the entrance, both on the upper level. Sunlight funnels through an opening in the rooftop down to the living area. The orange hot tub is by ALFI.
Cupertino, California
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
Ryan Anderson of RAD Furniture designed the stools as well as the table and benches on the pool deck.
Front house night view
The Shayan House takes full advantage of its canyon site.
“Often when we talk about sustainability we focus on the gadgetry, what makes things feasible off grid,” Moffitt says. “But to me there are more interesting things in passive design that rely on the available sun and wind.” An eight-panel solar array does chip in significantly, generating all the electricity the house needs.
The home’s front façade features an anodized aluminum and glass curtain wall by Kawneer that's framed by Vic West black corrugated metal panels. The board-formed concrete on the exterior enables passive solar absorption, allowing optimal heat retention on cold winter days. The metal and concrete exterior cladding offers cohesive dialogue with the neighboring industrial sheds and commercial buildings.
Shope and his wife carefully designed an eco-friendly landscape: For instance, they did not fell any tree with holes that could support an owl’s nest. They also planted flower species that feed hummingbirds and monarch butterflies. Shope laid out the pathway of reclaimed granite slabs that leads toward the Hudson River below.
The home is embedded in a hillside with five feet of soil above it. In addition to blending the structure into the landscape, the surrounding earth provides natural insulation.
To deter all bird collisions, his home’s Ornilux windows use a specialized inner coating to reflect ultraviolet light visible to the birds but invisible to the human eye.
Villa by the Ocean, 2004, features a long, low profile and a green roof.
Visitors enter through a narrow staircase, visible here as a slit to the right of the courtyard.
A square hole in the ground and a concrete slab are all that demarcate Byoung Cho’s Earth House from the surrounding countryside.
“There had been two or three primitive cabins on the property in the past, which resulted in a clearing that we utilized for the site,” Joseph Herrin says. “This allowed us to avoid any further tree removal for construction, and provided an opportunity to begin to restore that portion of the property with native landscaping.”

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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