234 Exterior Cabin Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

London-based practice De Rosee Sa’s self-built lakeside cabin recaptures the magic of childhood fairytales.  
A labor of love, the 377-square-foot Woodland Cabin is a design/build project completed over multiple trips to the lakeside lot in the village of Nouvelles in southern Belgium. The architects built the cabin using locally-sourced, storm-felled timber to deepen their understanding of materials and construction.  
By taking construction into their own hands and using locally-sourced materials, the team kept within the relatively tight budget of £25,000 ($32,872).   
Simple yet elegant, De Rosee Sa’s self-described
Nestled on a family farm, this South African shipping container cabin is completely off the grid. Located on owner Lucas Steyn’s family farm in Botrivier, a 90-minute drive from Capetown, Copia is an eco-retreat comprised of two shipping container cabins in the South African countryside.
Most impressive of all, a solar array on the roof empowers the residents to produce more energy than they consume on-site.
Metaphorically, architect Chris Kempel said, the Kynar-painted steel columns are trees.  “It was like taking a box and poking it with chopsticks.”
Large floor-to-ceiling windows and doors provide abundant natural light and ventilation.
The decidedly nontraditional structure includes a front wall that opens the living room onto the front yard—and to the rest of the neighborhood, which has enthusiastically welcomed the house and its owner.
In need of more room for their growing brood, Eric and Emma Gimon, with Luc, Paul, baby Louise, and their dog, Nefi, asked for a private space to accompany the house designed for Eric’s great-aunt.
The Urban Cabin examines life on a small footprint and looks at what the future could hold for city dwellers.
MINI LIVING always makes an effort to work together with local designers on their projects and the bright yellow metal spikes on the exterior were created by the MINI LIVING design team’s NYC-based collaborators Bureau V— injecting an element of surprise into the design.
The designers have incorporated nature via a wall of greenery creating a cozy nook with a sense of privacy and a relaxed vibe.
Oke Hauser and Corinna Natter of MINI LIVING in the Urban Cabin.
A combination home and photographer’s studio, the Studio House is an exploration of memories and their potential to resonate over time. Remnant landscape elements, building geometries and materials from the previous home on the site reappear in the new building. These fragments act as artifacts that recall earlier times. The two-story living room/studio has a curved roof that serves as a large reflector for diffusing natural and artificial light. Details, such as the stairs, fireplace, light fixtures and hardware, are made of metal and reflect the owner’s interests in art and craftsmanship. Photo by Paul Warchol.
Lake House
Lake House
Net Zero Prefab
It takes three to five days to install a Vipp Shelter onsite.
For 2015, Vipp, the Danish industrial design company known for its iconic trash cans and all-black kitchens, introduces a 592-square-foot prefab unit called Shelter.
Glass Farmhouse | Olson Kundig
Jason and Suzanne Koxvold commissioned Studio Padron to design a 200-square-foot guesthouse on their Ellenville, New York, property. The geometric structure’s dark cedar cladding contrasts with the inviting interior, which is heated by a cast-iron Jøtul stove. A layer of built-in bookshelves made from felled oak lumber also helps insulate the building in winter.
Girodo describes LEAPfactory’s architecture as being “molded according to the needs and stresses imposed by context.” In this setting, strong winds and snow loads are serious concerns. The shell’s composite sandwich panels and aluminum shingles ensure that the school can withstand the elements.
The front facade, covered in Minerit HD fiber cement panels, is muted save for a bright-green entrance ramp and red door. The entire project came in at about $225 per square foot.
In Scandinavian regions, traditional cabins are painted black using a mixture of tar and linseed oil. Peck reproduced the look using corrugated metal—a lower-maintenance, more sustainable material. “We love that it is black, because it really reminds us of home,” Bronee says. The house has no windows on its front side, belying its light-flooded interior.
To rent the cabin for a short stay, intrepid guests can contact Dus Architects at info@houseofdus.com

Photo: Ossip van Duivenbode
DUS Architects has made investigating on-demand custom housing solutions a primary concern. The Urban Cabin is made of a bio-plastic made of linseed oil that can be shredding and recycled into a new printed project.

Photo: Sophia van den Hoek
The architects used a number of different geometric designs on the facade to showcase the variety that can be achieved with the technique, while also optimizing insulation and material consumption. 

Photo: Sophia van den Hoek
At 55 square meters, the Vipp shelter is a steel prefab whose glass doors slide open to immerse guests in nature.
Photo by Tom Bies
View from pond.
The house clearly displays its Sea Ranch–style touches.
Snow buries scrub oak trees in front of the home's west elevation.
The home's deck is perched over a canyon full of wildlife and rugged vegetation.
Warm cedar siding contrasts the snow capped ridge on a bright Utah winter day.
The iridescent exterior allows light to enter while maintaining a sense of privacy thanks to a wall of greenery.
On a scenic one-acre site in Inverness, California, Richardson Architects planted an artist studio in a hillside overlooking a coastal vista. The client, a painter who lives on the property, requested the addition be situated downhill from the main residence to create distance between work and home.
A celebration of nature in Norway, this rural hotel marries modern architecture with stunning natural landscapes. All of the hotel’s seven rooms, which are built into the landscape, are unique and offer either views of the valley, river, courtyard or a dramatic gorge.
A simple walkway leads to the unassuming entrance. "It's obscured, detailed like the cedar walls," Poss says. Photo by Phillip Kalantzis-Cope.
Designed by architect Jeffery Poss, the tea hut is the first of what Kalanzis and her husband, Bill Cope, hope to be several sculptural structures on their property, which comprises a forested grove to the east, a former tree farm on the west, and the main house and hut in the middle. Photo by Phillip Kalantzis-Cope.

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