188 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Living in the house before starting construction enabled Will and his wife, Jennifer, to acclimate themselves to the area and allowed Will to consider how to make the home accessible to Raul, his daughter’s wheelchair-using foster child.
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Rockport, Massachusetts
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
A family in Hamburg, Germany, turned a kitschy turn-of-the-century villa into a high-design home with a few exterior tricks, including sheathing the exterior in one-dimensional, murdered-out black.
Twenty-two 12-foot-wide steel-frame modules were combined to form nine to 14-foot-high rooms that were stacked and bolted together. Ten deck modules added more than 4,700 square feet of sheltered outdoor space. Image courtesy of Jill Paider.
North facade - the framed box
Cor-Ten steel and board-form concrete give the exterior a weathered look.
Ramirez and his partner, Sarah Mason Williams, dine at a sequoia table by Redwood Burl next to a hulking juniper tree that they asked the architects to preserve as a centerpiece of the property.
Street Entrance
Main Volume
SIERRA LEONA
Custom river red gum sliding windows and australian cypress door.
Northern elevation; Australian Cypress, concrete, and river red gum.
The Brain is a 14,280 cubic-foot cinematic laboratory where the client, a filmmaker, can work out ideas. Physically, a garage—that neighborhood birthplace of invention—provides the conceptual model. The form is essentially a cast-in-place concrete box, intended to be a strong yet neutral background that provides complete flexibility to adapt the space at will. Inserted into the box along the north wall is a steel mezzanine. All interior structures are made using raw hot-rolled steel sheets. Photo by Marco Prozzo.
A combination home and photographer’s studio, the Studio House is an exploration of memories and their potential to resonate over time. Remnant landscape elements, building geometries and materials from the previous home on the site reappear in the new building. These fragments act as artifacts that recall earlier times. The two-story living room/studio has a curved roof that serves as a large reflector for diffusing natural and artificial light. Details, such as the stairs, fireplace, light fixtures and hardware, are made of metal and reflect the owner’s interests in art and craftsmanship. Photo by Paul Warchol.
exterior
Another 1956 tract house with a flat roof designed by Krisel.
Street Entrance Facade
New addition at rear of house framing the original house and interior areas
Fir slats on the wall and ceiling run through to the outdoors, visually expanding the space.
To deal with a Malibu site’s sharp incline, architect Bruce Bolander set the steel, concrete, and glass house on caissons. A deep wraparound porch nearly doubles the home’s living space and offers the ideal perch for outdoor dining and taking in spectacular views of the surrounding canyon. The garage serves as resident Dave Keffer’s home office.
Dr. Kenneth Montague’s Toronto loft is both home and art gallery—and the ultimate party house, thanks to two kitchens, a rooftop deck, and no shortage of conversation pieces. In warm weather, Montague’s parties spill onto the roof deck. To encourage guests to explore, Peterson designed two built-in light fixtures, made from LEDs behind white acrylic panels, that cast a dramatic glow across the sauna’s custom-made wood door, designed by Peterson and crafted by carpenter Daniel Liebster.
Galvanized-aluminum flashing is used to hide lighting fixtures and to delineate the tops of the redwood-strip walls. “It’s a simple palette of materials,” says Bornstein.
Designed Californian architects Swatt Miers, these three tea houses on a private property were conceived as spaces outside the main home that would be free from the distractions of Internet, telecommunications and television. The largest of the three pavilions is used as a workspace, the second as a bedroom, and the third as a meditation pavilion.
Windchime at Entry
Photo by Tom Bies
Casa ai Pozzi makes a bold statement on the mountainous shores of Lake Maggiore. The windows that wrap around this concrete villa afford stunning views of the Swiss Alps, and the inverted pyramid that supports the structure subtly mirrors the surrounding mountain peaks.

Photo by: Hélène Binet
The rear of the house looks onto a lush backyard. The rough, industrial prefabricated concrete panels by the German manufacturer Syspro are the building blocks of the home.
“I simply was drawn to the notion of concrete. So much great modern architecture has made use of it,” Blauvelt says.
The house in the evening, with the main living space and basement illuminated. "It gets pretty windy here," Jamie says. "I have nightmares about the roof coming off like the lid of a can."
The plexiglass tube's reverse lighting scheme emulates a starry sky above the patio when the interior is lit up at night.
The plexiglass tubes animate and add texture to an otherwise spartan facade.
Fir slats on the wall and ceiling run through to the outdoors, visually expanding the space.
To deal with a Malibu site’s sharp incline, architect Bruce Bolander set the steel, concrete, and glass house on caissons. A deep wraparound porch nearly doubles the home’s living space and offers the ideal perch for outdoor dining and taking in spectacular views of the surrounding canyon. The garage serves as resident Dave Keffer’s home office. Photo by J Bennett Fitts.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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