200 Dining Room Shelves Design Photos And Ideas

The dining area features Cappellini stools and Hans Wegner dining chairs.
The bar, topped in Amazonite Quartzite and complemented by mirrors, wood, and seating reminiscent of a diner, is a highlight of the space.
A mix of wood and tile lends Brothers and Sisters a rich texture.
When more seating is required, the family can simply roll out more table space. The extra seating comes out from under the bird cabinet in the living room.
To provide privacy without putting up light-obstructing walls, the architects installed curtains that can be pulled along curved tracks in the bedrooms and bathrooms.
The kitchen received a light "punch-up," including this wall-mounted pegboard shelving system.
A reading nook fits perfectly into one of the cantilevered boxes.
Enhanced by views of the landscape, the flexible dining room table doubles as a workspace.
Objects, from a skateboard to tableware to books, give the dining room a curated boutique hotel lobby feel. The spider chandelier is another highlight.
New York, New York
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
Massaro hired Connecticut craftsmen to create the Wrightian furnishings, doors, and windows.
The walls studded with locally sourced granite rocks throughout the home are meant to be in the likeness of Wright's "desert masonry" style but have garnered criticism from purists who say the rocks should sit flush. Massaro says that was impossible due to building codes and insulation requirements.
The old wooden ceiling beams in the dining room were purchased from a local Amish farmer and painted white. Warm timbers tie the home together.
Double-glazed windows open the home up to the permaculture garden outside and northern sunlight. The kitchen is visible from nearly every room in the home.
The dining room.
When designer Michael Corsar converted a late Victorian utility building in Suffolk 
into a home for his friend Sandy Suffield, he kept the charming features, like the 17-foot ceilings, while making the space habitable after years of neglect. Deben Joinery built the kitchen cabinetry. The vintage Optima pendants are by Danish designer Hans Due.
In the kitchen, a Heath-tiled backsplash sits over leathered granite counters. Smoked-oak cabinet doors from Reform cover Ikea cabinets.
Large openings create the feeling of being outdoors, while remaining protected inside.
There is even a casual dining area with direct outside access to the pool area.
White oak flooring in a guest suite.
Peter and his wife, artist Olia Feshina, relax inside their apartment in New York’s Washington Heights.
Custom furnishings that fold or slide away when not in use, as well as a new floor plan, give the couple a flexible, singular home with many options.
The small table with two stools pops out.
The dining room.
The dining area, which is just off the kitchen, features a built-in banquette.
The timber windows and doors are by Charles Sandford.
Discrete rooms are parsed by large, arched concrete pillars, and spaces flow seamlessly into each other.
The kitchen was sunk down a few steps to better define it from the rest of the living spaces, while built-in, Douglas Fir cabinetry maximizes and streamlines storage. The custom Douglas Fir table is by ZZ Contracting.
Open shelving continues from the kitchen to the sun room, with Cappellini Big Break dining table and Knoll Gigi chairs.
INT2 architecture used a variety of different materials to delineate spaces throughout the apartment.
The wine cellar can be seen through the glass section of the floor.
When the glass partitions are open, the passive heat from the conservatory is then released into the adjoining living spaces.
"I painted these bookcases white to brighten up the space, but then nothing else matched them," says Janelle. "So naturally, everything else in the room had to go so that the bookcases could work. So pretty much this room was built around white paint."
The dining table and chairs were swapped out for more contemporary furnishings. To keep costs low, Janelle shopped at big box stores; the light fixture is from Costco and the chairs are from Target.
Large windows pulls views of the landscape indoors to create an immersive experience in the open-plan living spaces.
There are over 300 custom-made cabinet doors in the home, as well as custom light fixtures.
The wall of windows is original, while the floor received new concrete. Horner also specified a new stove and hood, as well as a new backsplash in large textured field tile from The Surface Store in Portland.
Horner replaced the closed storage with custom, open shelving that now connects to the entry, increasing natural light and sight lines throughout the house.
"A space in my house that I love is our bougie breakfast nook with the fancy marble table and brass pedestal bottom," says Encarnacion.
Matte-black Tolix chairs surround a 14-foot harvest dining table that dates back to the 1800s.
Detailing for the open shelves next to dining area allows for the interplay of light and shadow.
A breakfast nook, big enough for two.
In the Dining, a display case built into an existing bay-window houses an extensive collection of wine glasses.
Stepping into the Dining, a white wall connects the Dining and Master bedroom visually. An adjacent grey wall, is a backdrop for a painting of complementing texture.
The vegan pizza and ice cream bar features a reclaimed wood counter, dark green Muuto Nerd stools, and Clé tile on the stair risers.
The living-room and the terrace
Dining
In the Library, built-in bookcases and a long banquette (upholstered in Kravet’s Versailles Velvet fabric, color E25600) were installed on the far side of the room.
The Library, which serves as a dining room at the inn, was given a bold color scheme. The walls and paneling were painted in Farrow & Ball’s Stiffkey Blue, and the ceiling was given a lighter shade. The Dallas Chandelier from Arteriors adds a sleek, contemporary edge to the space.
Fitted cupboards and bookcases help create a streamlined look throughout the home. Jutting into the space from the interior walls are rod-like metal lights, which add to the vintage feel.
The custom built-ins create the perfect breakfast nook, complete with a built-in bench and pantry storage on both sides. A new window draws additional daylight into the space.
The pavilion relates to the original house in the exterior framework, as both use white-painted timber. Glass doors retract for full outdoor access.
Indoor/outdoor living was a priority in the redesign, and the interior was reconfigured so that views of the backyard and the majestic gum tree can be immediately seen as soon as the front door is opened.
Recycled timbers are used throughout the home from the curved bench to the joinery in the kitchen. The kitchen also connects to a cold-store walk-in pantry that’s cooled with an in-slab ventilation pipe funneling cool under-house air.

The modern dining room is where the universal ritual of breaking bread brings us together. The projects below showcase elegant configurations and designs that encompass chairs and tables, bars and stools, lighting, flooring, and fireplaces.