Dwell's Favorite 208 Living Room Design Photos And Ideas

The first floor has been conceived as an open integrated space with the main floor
The view from the cave-like nook towards the courtyard.
A traditional tatami room with shoji sliding doors is located next to the open-plan living space.
The retro-chic vibe of Copenhagen's Hotel Alexsandra
The white plaster inside the home signals a continuation of the outdoor facade. The cave-like nook was inspired by the fireplace in Swedish architect Erik Gunnar Asplund's summer house.
“Although the LDK (living room, dining room, kitchen) faces east, it is bathed in light reflected off the hill in the afternoon,” say the architects. “With the absence of beams and sealing strips, the rafter seems to protrude from the white structural wall, making the LDK seem like a semi-outdoor veranda. The living room has become part of the garden, where you can naturally engage with the children playing or sprawling on the slope of the hill.”
Teak is used extensively throughout the home—from the flooring to the kitchen cabinetry. The dining chairs and table are from Sakura Shop.
The kitchen and convertible desk area of the Kugelschiff display a luminous, white-painted ceiling and walls, and white ash cabinetry and flooring.
Concrete floors keep the interior cool in the summer.
Martin and Katz plastered over the stucco finish of the fireplace wall with soft gray Venetian plaster.
The guesthouse has similar built-ins and is outfitted with a reproduction rotating sconce by Serge Mouille and rugs by Stephanie Odegard.
The living spaces of house, built in 1972 or 1973, were originally divided into three—a kitchen, living and dining area, and an atrium (previous owners had covered the atrium with a roof). "The new owners wanted the interior space to flow as one, so we removed the glass doors and solid walls separating the enclosed atrium from the kitchen and living room," principal John Klopf says. "Some structural posts needed to remain to hold up the roof, but overall the space was opened up almost completely. The floor was leveled, and the plan freed up." The rainbow print is a 1960s Herman Miller trade poster, and the Vitamin Water print by a New York artist. A Sapien book tower from Design Within Reach sits next to the TV. The sofa is IKEA.
Finished in white, the walls, the floors and ceiling are contrasted by only splashes of color from sparsely place furniture and framed artworks.
Taiwan apartment renovation by Hao Design includes a new floor with a wooden bridge-like corridor that connects a master bedroom to a walk-in wardrobe on the mezzanine level.
Named Atelierhouse, for contemporary art museum Museion as a temporary home for visiting artists and curators, Harry Thaler Studio employed wooden boxes on wheels fold open to reveal beds inside.
In the living and dining area of Jean Risom's Block Island family retreat, mostly vintage Risom furnishings share space with a few new additions, the view facing north is framed by the wall of glass.

Photo by: Floto + Warner
The large expanses of glass frame views that were perfectly planned. The seating areas are furnished with Scandia lounge chairs that were designed by Hans Brattrud in the 1950s and are now being produced by Fjordfiesta.
In the main living area, designer Delta Wright of Curated paired vintage finds with the owners’ existing furniture. The lighting, including the Ukiyo G ceiling light by Manuel Vivian for Axo Light, is from Lumens. Photo by Coral von Zumwalt.
Over five months, Naude and Brown renovated their desert bungalow into a design retreat and second home for themselves, baby Rico, and their dog, Mona.
The living lounge opens to a small balcony.
Laurier Blanc acrylic glass Hekla Side Table & Stool, embedded with burnt wood truck, with accents of resin, compliments the Taylor Forest club chair, beneath the Amir Zaki waterfall photograph.
City Cabin | Olson Kundig
Architect George Bradley and his husband, Eddie Baba, renovated a 1941 house in San Francisco. Tiles from Heath Ceramics surround the Ortal Clear 130LS fireplace. The white ceramic logs are by Klein Reid; the floor is oak.
Architect Alex Gil and his wife, Claudia DeSimio, affixed a 750-square-foot addition to the roof of a 19th-century Williamsburg townhouse, transforming their cramped third-floor apartment into a modern duplex. The original fireplace remains, but has been stripped down to exposed brick, as have the surrounding walls, creating an almost wainscot-like design of exposed brick with flat white drywall above.
Scott set the windows into deep recesses.
A wedge-shaped skylight allows natural light to suffuse the interiors. The architects preserved a palette of dark, natural materials on the ground floor.
“We designed a column-free interior space for the entire upper floor, indoor and outdoors, to connect the spaces. This structural approach, which includes outdoor space in the span of a roof system, is unusual. The seven sliding glazed panels at the rear and corner of the house allow it to open up onto large exterior spaces,” says McLeod.
Floor-to-ceiling glass walls on both sides of the main living room allow sweeping views straight through the house.
The material palette of concrete, weathered steel, and natural cedar mimics the colors and textures of the hills.
The neutral color palette was carried over to the interior design, a collaborative effort between Connie Wone, the senior interior designer at Swatt Miers Architects, and Elisa Chambers of Snake River Interiors.
Expansive glazing provides continuous visual connections to the outdoors.
"Blue and white tones came up very often during our conversations, and the fact that the property was sitting right on the ocean made it feel like a good fit for their vision," adds Audrito.
Double height living area opens onto the home's interconnecting courtyard and floods the living space with natural light.
The living room takes full advantage of the homes' stunning views.
Interior view West
Living Room
Villa K enjoys stunning views of the nearby Atlas Mountains.
Stadt Architecture’s Christopher Kitterman transformed a generic studio in Chelsea into a bright one-bedroom apartment for Vancouver couple Dale Steele and Dan Nguyen. The living room features a Hans Wegner GE290 lounge chair upholstered in leather by Spinneybeck, a round rug and Cobble Hill Adams sofa from ABC Carpet & Home, a Pedrera coffee table by Gubi, and a Bob side table by Poltrona Frau. An automated lift raises a TV from inside the custom millwork under the window. Acid-etched tempered glass doors lead to the bedroom.
"We are able to...take full advantage of the northern orientation, introducing passive solar design techniques, which allows the design to maximize its thermal efficiency," says MODO founder Michael Ong.
The shallow plan helps with cross ventilation, while a deep overhang to the north provides shade for the living areas in the summer.
Upon entering the house, one immediately sees right through to the rear garden from the main corridor.
Beds are lofted above the kitchenette and large bench, and are accessible by wooden ladders.
Large sliding doors fully enable indoor/outdoor living.
Rather than opting for the schematic, open-plan design of the renovated Queensland worker's cottage, the formalized living, sitting, and dining areas are compartmentalized; each room is dedicated to their function.
Positioned for stellar outdoor views, the screened porch features concrete floors, a cedar ceiling, natural fir posts, and midcentury chairs.
The family room is situated at the apex of the house, with picturesque views that extend 

up the meticulously landscaped north slope. The concrete floor sits just low enough that the main elements of the scene—the succulent garden and large limestone ledges—are at eye level. A bank of NanaWall folding windows breaks up the fourth wall.
Resident Peter Østergaard (with Maja, 6, and Carl, 20 months) and architect and photographer Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen have been best friends since they were 13, which makes for easy collaboration. Says Bjerre-Poulsen: “There are always a lot of challenges in a renovation, 

but Peter and Åsa trusted my judgment and gave me a completely free hand. Usually it’s hard to push people into unconventional solutions, but Peter has 

all these wild and crazy ideas.” One such idea was 

to embed a transparent glass-and-iron door in 

the floor, operated by a 

hydraulic pump, which allows access to the subterranean wine cellar. At night, the lit-up cellar glows, lending the compact living room an increased sense 

of verticality.
In lieu of a checkerboard effect, Kovel kept his carpet squares all vibrantly verdant. With the bamboo cabinets and countertops the whole space has a pastoral feel. “I wanted it to be like the Bradys’ backyard,” he says.
Colourful furnishings animate the space. Thonet armchair, Jardan Nook lounge and Hay side tables provide a comfortable, deliberately low key setting.
The cabins—all designed in-house—sport a minimalist aesthetic, deliberately pared-down to let nature take the spotlight.
The living room has a close-up street view and abundant natural light. The sofa is Mags from Hay Studio, the table is an old Fritz Hansen base with a new top, and the Arne Jacobsen chair is also a refurbished vintage piece.
In the warm interior of the X House in Hennepin, Illinois, Diane Pascal and Thomas Richie enjoy the view from their boiled-wool Ligne Roset couch in the main living area, where wood paneling on the ceiling and walls mirrors the topography of the landscape. A gauzy green curtain adds a moment of color to the scheme.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.