Dwell's Favorite 67 Living Room Medium Hardwood Floors Design Photos And Ideas

When designing her weekend getaway in Valle de Bravo, Mexico, architect Fernanda Canales knew the remote nature of the plateau and erratic weather conditions would prove tricky. In addition to withstanding the harsh climate, the house would need to also be self-sufficient. To embrace the beauty of the landscape while being open to sun exposure, the home wraps around four courtyards. Brick and concrete with high thermal mass create the foundation; its red hue and rough texture are juxtaposed against smooth concrete and wood inside. A unique facet to the home are the arches in the roofline—barrel-vaulted ceilings span the family room and all the bedrooms.
To add more space to her petite Florence apartment originally designed by Roberto Monsani, architect Silvia Allori incorporated fold-down furniture and storage into the white laminate walls that also support bookshelves.
Infused with traditional materials and aesthetics, this open-plan home in Japan strengthens the bond a young family has to nature and to each other.
Halfway through a pregnancy isn’t exactly the ideal time to buy a house. So after spending months scouting San Francisco’s Victorians and turnkey cookie-cutters—and almost defecting to the East Bay—Lorena Siminovich and Esteban Kerner decided to put the hunt on hold until after their baby was born. But then one afternoon Kerner, a design director with Old Navy, logged on to Craigslist on a whim. He saw a below-market listing for a single-family home in Noe Valley, their neighborhood of choice.

With crumbly brick cladding, peeling rust-brown paint, and rotting garage doors, the house lacked curb appeal. But the Argentine couple was drawn to the interior. "It was amazing and strange at the same time," says Kerner of the 1,485-square-foot, multilevel, midcentury maze. "Mind-boggling," adds Siminovich. "It was just a knot of doors and a series of insane stairs to nowhere."
The dining room features a tongue-and- groove Douglas fir ceiling. Original built-ins include a mahogany bench anchored between cabinets whose fronts tilt at the house’s signature 15-degree angle.
Each home that Wright designed was unique to its circumstances, and the Penfield House was no exception. Set on 30 acres in Lake County, Ohio, the 1950 home has taller ceilings and an elongated profile to accommodate the client Louis Penfield—who was six foot eight.
Designed for “utilizing every cubic centimeter to its utmost,” the compact cabin feels large thanks to full-height glazing and clean, minimalist design.
The spacious living room features full-length windows that create a connection with nature. Pink plaster walls were restored to their original condition, as were plywood built-ins.
Located on a narrow site, Living Screen House by CplusC Architectural Workshop features a unique lap pool abutting a double-height social space. Living green wall screens to the front and side façades provide privacy.
The upper floor of one of the cabins features a wood-burning stove, beanbag chairs, and a hanging paper lantern.
The existing wood structure and ceiling of the former saloon were completely refinished, and the exposed rafters were painted white for a brighter and more spacious feel. The old windows, floors, and finishes were replaced to create consistency with the new house.
Large decks and walls of glass blur the boundaries between indoor/outdoor living.
“An important part of the work was to design large common spaces, and to be able to receive a large number of people,” note the architects. “The common spaces are designed for the coexistence between family and friends.”
The largest beams in the home are made of cenizaro—a native tree that's larger than teak but has a similar grain.
Drawing inspiration from Japanese contemporary architecture, Jorge Alonso Albendea gave the home a modern and minimalist aesthetic.
Pine plywood complements the home's bright white walls and beams, while the heightened ceilings and multiple windows make the space feel larger than its 527 square feet.
A leather sofa, brass floor lamp, and wood coffee table in Carter's work studio.
“The overarching goal was to preserve the rustic character of the original building without making any compromises in terms of modern comfort,” says La Firme. The team hid modern appliances (like the refrigerator) below eye level and worked with the original, century-old structure of The Barn.
White brick walls provide a textured backdrop for light and shadows to play.
The architects dropped the floor of the lower level to create 10-foot-tall ceilings. The existing den and master bedroom now serve as a media room furnished with an Eero Saarinen table from Knoll, Bruno Hansen chairs, and an Original Timber Co. bench.
The minimalist living room includes built-in seating.
On the other side of the bathroom “box” is a lounge with a lofted reading room. The space also serves as the perfect play room.
The living area features Roche Bobois furnishings and a rug made from the farm’s sheep wool. Not pictured is the central fireplace built of locally quarried stone.
The Ori Cloud Bed fits perfectly into the wooden baffles of the canopy above. The back cushions of the sofa turn into a headboard when the bed is lowered.
A large corner window floods the living room with natural light and river views. The room is furnished with a vintage Parker sofa, Paper table by Gamfratesi, Hiroshima lounge chairs by Naoto Fukasawa, and River Weave Rug from Armadillo & Co.
Enclosed in glass and elevated in the tree canopy, the living room is furnished with midcentury modern classics including a Case Kelston sofa from DWR and a Knoll Womb chair and ottoman. The custom red wool rug is from Driscoll Robbins.
The living room in the "Baller Jawn." The living room console is from Leeward, and the light fixture is from Noevara. The sling chairs are by Noevara in collaboration with True Hand, and the framed artwork is from Megan Biddle.
A geometric wood accent wall lies across from the main entry wall and runs alongside the stairs.
"Rooms required thoughtfully scaled and placed pieces," say the designers. "Because of the numerous large windows in every room of the house, the color choices and textures were chosen with inspiration from outside."
Nestled among trees and apple orchards, this warm and inviting family home makes the most of its peaceful wooded plot.
Materials enhance this natural connection, reflecting the silvery hues of the overcast sky of the Pacific Northwest and tying the building to the forest floor.
If they aren’t at the cocktail-fueled Evening Bar, chances are guests are hanging out in the “living room”—at least until the beer hall Brakeman and fried chicken joint Penny Red’s open.
The view from the cave-like nook towards the courtyard.
The white plaster inside the home signals a continuation of the outdoor facade. The cave-like nook was inspired by the fireplace in Swedish architect Erik Gunnar Asplund's summer house.
“Although the LDK (living room, dining room, kitchen) faces east, it is bathed in light reflected off the hill in the afternoon,” say the architects. “With the absence of beams and sealing strips, the rafter seems to protrude from the white structural wall, making the LDK seem like a semi-outdoor veranda. The living room has become part of the garden, where you can naturally engage with the children playing or sprawling on the slope of the hill.”
Teak is used extensively throughout the home—from the flooring to the kitchen cabinetry. The dining chairs and table are from Sakura Shop.
In the living and dining area of Jean Risom's Block Island family retreat, mostly vintage Risom furnishings share space with a few new additions, the view facing north is framed by the wall of glass.

Photo by: Floto + Warner
Scott set the windows into deep recesses.
Floor-to-ceiling glass walls on both sides of the main living room allow sweeping views straight through the house.
The material palette of concrete, weathered steel, and natural cedar mimics the colors and textures of the hills.
The neutral color palette was carried over to the interior design, a collaborative effort between Connie Wone, the senior interior designer at Swatt Miers Architects, and Elisa Chambers of Snake River Interiors.
Double height living area opens onto the home's interconnecting courtyard and floods the living space with natural light.
The living room takes full advantage of the homes' stunning views.
Stadt Architecture’s Christopher Kitterman transformed a generic studio in Chelsea into a bright one-bedroom apartment for Vancouver couple Dale Steele and Dan Nguyen. The living room features a Hans Wegner GE290 lounge chair upholstered in leather by Spinneybeck, a round rug and Cobble Hill Adams sofa from ABC Carpet & Home, a Pedrera coffee table by Gubi, and a Bob side table by Poltrona Frau. An automated lift raises a TV from inside the custom millwork under the window. Acid-etched tempered glass doors lead to the bedroom.
The shallow plan helps with cross ventilation, while a deep overhang to the north provides shade for the living areas in the summer.
Colourful furnishings animate the space. Thonet armchair, Jardan Nook lounge and Hay side tables provide a comfortable, deliberately low key setting.
The cabins—all designed in-house—sport a minimalist aesthetic, deliberately pared-down to let nature take the spotlight.
The master bedroom is defined on the north side by a series of indoor louvers, which allow the couple to frame and manage their views.
This low-maintenance home near Brisbane, Australia, exemplifies architect James Grose’s design philosophy based around simple, lightweight construction techniques well suited to the region’s subtropical climate.
In this house in the Mornington Peninsula in the south of Melbourne, materials like concrete, natural stone, steel and cedar are perfect backdrops for architecture and interior design firm SJB to use bold colors and edgy midcentury furniture.
Protected by an overhang, and floating above ground level, this tertiary space is known in traditional homes as the "engawa." To sustain a unified look throughout, the floor and ceiling are clad in ipe wood.
Masahiro and Mao Harada of Mount Fuji Architects Studio wanted to break with the traditional definition of a house when they designed this small Tokyo home. They achieved their goal by using the same material for the ceiling, the walls, and the floor, creating a space that flows beautifully. 

Photo by Ryota Atarashi.
The table’s base, which itself is an additional storage container, rolls easily into place to support the surface.
A 606 Universal Shelving System by Dieter Rams for Vitsoe hangs tough on the only opaque wall of the living room. Russell-Clarke and Moolsintong designed the coffee table, and Marcel Wanders gets credit for the Bottoni sofa for Moooi.
The exposed ceiling beams and inserted steel framing system are visible in the lower level, where Lange and Dixon relax with their son Paul.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.