Dwell’s Favorite 76 Living Room Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

SHED replaced the windows with new wood units of the same style. Note how the shelving at the half-wall aligns perfectly with the window mullions.
Main living space
Artist Christopher Florentino created this studio to be a source of inspiration. "This space is for me as an artist—to create in, to keep me inspired," he says. "I don’t think there are many spaces that have a Keith Haring and Shiro Kuramata chair in the same space. I’m trying to show who I am as a designer and as an artist."
A view from the sleeping space into the living area, where Ligne Roset sofas sit on an IKEA carpet under a vintage Lightolier chandelier. A custom curtain rod bends onto the adjacent wall so that the drapery does not obscure any of the window. "There is strong light and shadows in the apartment," Antonio says.
The mezzanine level hosts the bedrooms and overlooks the lower living spaces.
The custom steelwork seen throughout the home was all done by Identity Construction, including the bar in the loft space that overlooks the living area.
The living and dining room look out to the central courtyard, promoting indoor/outdoor living. Here, five doors slide into a pocket in the wall to create a nearly 23-foot-wide opening on one side looking into the garden. Another set on the opposite side enhances cross ventilation.
The curved ceiling was built from layered Austral Plywoods hoop pine plywood sourced from Queensland plantation forests. The flooring is blackbutt timber.
"We really wanted the rest of the house to be quiet in order to showcase the shipping containers as art objects," says Davis. "So, we used a very simple materials palette: lots of big windows and doors to bring in light and open up to the yards; heated concrete floors, polished to reveal the aggregate; basic IKEA cabinets; sheetrock painted a gallery-like white; and some touches of light, natural wood to add warmth and texture."
A custom walnut-and-steel coffee table from Jobe Fabrications anchors the living room. Fenton and Fenton armchairs are paired with a Texas Leather Interiors sofa. Drophouse Design crafted the fireplace copper wrap, and Thomas Studio and Foundry treated the metal to create a unique copper patina that matches the kitchen hood fan. Limestone is part of the exterior landscaping, but makes its way into the home as well to act as the base of the fireplace. Each piece is seven feet long, and puzzles together.
The concrete hearth at the fireplace has angled sidewalls and a bevelled edge.
Floor-to-ceiling shelves and storage bookend a cabinet that conceals the television.
Zachary designed a new cabinet in walnut to anchor the room. The wood tones are a warm counterpoint to the butter-yellow sofa. The coffee table belonged to the owners.
There are many textures at play in the living room—the board-formed concrete ceiling, the light brick wall, wood paneling, and the terrazzo floors. "The texture of the timber is reflected in the concrete," says Peake. The lightwell adds an additional internal light source and another spot to insert greenery. The Vibia Palma wall sconce from Koda Lighting is affixed to the wall over the sofa.
The cream-colored bricks continue to the interior and reinforce and indoor/outdoor living experience. The vintage Stilnovo wall light is from Nicholas & Alistair.
Oak slats in the living room echo the timber slats that enclose the entry courtyard. The black-marble Empire side tables are by local furniture brand Seer Studio, and the white-marble Tulip table is by Eero Saarinen for Knoll.
When glass dominates a home, the result is a borderless residence that syncs with its environs, creating a stunning, new visual and psychological sense of space. See how these glass homes use the versatile material to create ambiance and connect with the outdoors.
The four-bed, four-bath home of Peter and Sarah Diamond and their two adult children is uniquely situated in one of the most remote areas of the Berkshires: Mount Washington, Massachusetts.
In defiance of its oversized neighbors, this sustainable 753-square-foot home in Perth, by architecture firm Whispering Smith, maximizes its small footprint through built-in furniture and textures of concrete, reclaimed brick, tile, and white metal. Devoid of walls and doors, the streamlined spaces flow into one another, and connect to the ample rear courtyard.
In the living area, sofas and a chair by Piero Lissoni for Cassina join a floor lamp by Michele de Lucchi for Artemide.
Loft Space
“Instead of using a typical frame system, we created frameless windows by burying aluminum channels into the floors and walls,” says Richard. “It kept our glazing budget much lower than normal.” The sofas feature custom upholstery by Inverse Project and HDM.
Each home that Wright designed was unique to its circumstances, and the Penfield House was no exception. Set on 30 acres in Lake County, Ohio, the 1950 home has taller ceilings and an elongated profile to accommodate the client Louis Penfield—who was six foot eight.
Artist and corrective-exercise specialist, Ruth Hiller, moved to Winter Park, Colorado from New York knowing that her home would be glass and steel with wraparound windows. She hopped on the phone with architect Michael Johnson, he drew the sketch, and it took a mere five minutes to decide on the design. The common areas are suspended and cantilevered over the backyard ravine, offering views of a winding mountain creek while also doubling the square footage. A Bathyscafocus by Focus Creations fireplace warms up the modern abode.
Spaces are kept minimal to instill a sense of serenity. A Pilotta chair from Cassina is the only piece of furniture other than the built-in bench.
What was once a poorly planned floor plan has transformed into open, brightly lit living spaces at the hub of the home.
The sectional is from Dellarobbia, and the leather chair is the Toro Lounge Chair from Blu Dot. Annie Wise sourced the rugs and accent pillows.
The Miller House and Garden features a custom-made sofa in the open-plan living area designed by Saarinen with textiles by Girard. The home was widely published and is in part credited for the popularity of conversation pits in the 1950s and 1960s.
The couple purchased the living room’s H.W. Klein chairs with the house. Another existing piece was the mezzanine’s daybed, designed by Peter Hvidt and Orlando Mølgaard Nielsen. An original floating staircase leads to the mezzanine and then up to the second floor. The open, straight-forward spaces speak to one of Christian’s guiding principles: “Simplicity is the key,” he says.
Manhattan Daybed by Guy Rogers.
The home's living room is a midcentury-inspired oasis.
The On the Rocks sofa designed by Francesco Binfaré for Edra has seating on both sides to maximize appreciation of the views.
All of the lights are equipped with dimming mechanisms, and they emit a honey-hued glow to create a sense of warmth.
The corner of the living area is wrapped in glass.
A shelving system in the living room displays books, decor, and the couple’s vinyl collection.
The architects dropped the floor of the lower level to create 10-foot-tall ceilings. The existing den and master bedroom now serve as a media room furnished with an Eero Saarinen table from Knoll, Bruno Hansen chairs, and an Original Timber Co. bench.
The minimalist living room includes built-in seating.
The tiny apartment is filled with clever space-saving solutions, including built-in storage and transforming furniture.
"Rooms required thoughtfully scaled and placed pieces," say the designers. "Because of the numerous large windows in every room of the house, the color choices and textures were chosen with inspiration from outside."
Another cozy reading nook takes advantage of natural light.
Living and dining spaces wrap around the full-height fireplace.  Original light fixtures remain and have been outfitted with LED lights.
The first floor has been conceived as an open integrated space with the main floor
The kitchen and convertible desk area of the Kugelschiff display a luminous, white-painted ceiling and walls, and white ash cabinetry and flooring.
The living lounge opens to a small balcony.
Double height living area opens onto the home's interconnecting courtyard and floods the living space with natural light.
Interior view West
Living Room
The shallow plan helps with cross ventilation, while a deep overhang to the north provides shade for the living areas in the summer.
Colourful furnishings animate the space. Thonet armchair, Jardan Nook lounge and Hay side tables provide a comfortable, deliberately low key setting.
The cabins—all designed in-house—sport a minimalist aesthetic, deliberately pared-down to let nature take the spotlight.
In this house in the Mornington Peninsula in the south of Melbourne, materials like concrete, natural stone, steel and cedar are perfect backdrops for architecture and interior design firm SJB to use bold colors and edgy midcentury furniture.
The plan is super efficient but with gracious moments. This was also family's home for four generations, so preserving the house’s original shape and honoring that history was important factor in the design process.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.