Dwell's Favorite 51 Living Room Wood Burning Fireplace Design Photos And Ideas

Rustic, Scandinavian-style The Hut, in Ohio, is a true family affair; the sustainable cabin, covered in cedar shingles, was built by architect Greg Dutton and his brother and father. Inside, views are amplified through a 25-foot wall of floor-to-ceiling windows.
In this renovated midcentury in Seattle, the living room’s fireplace has been powder-coated orange to complement the vintage furnishings, including a test bomb discovered at an antiques mall.
When glass dominates a home, the result is a borderless residence that syncs with its environs, creating a stunning, new visual and psychological sense of space. See how these glass homes use the versatile material to create ambiance and connect with the outdoors.
The mountain abode is nestled on a quiet street a mere 10 minutes from the slopes, and it shares its lot with a gathering of large trees. The house also comfortably accommodates up to 10 people, so it's perfect for hosting friends and their families.
The strips of cedar on the ceiling that fan out from the ridge beam are “meant to evoke the canopy of the surrounding conifers,” says the firm. The built-in cabinetry throughout is Sapele.
“Instead of using a typical frame system, we created frameless windows by burying aluminum channels into the floors and walls,” says Richard. “It kept our glazing budget much lower than normal.” The sofas feature custom upholstery by Inverse Project and HDM.
San Francisco’s modernists were faced with the issue of building within a firmly established stylistic tradition—think bay windows and gingerbread. Henry Hill’s 1947 renovation of a 1908 Victorian tucked away on an alley in historic Russian Hill provides a remarkable response to the dilemma.
Rachel Nolan and Steven Farrell’s weekend house is located a couple of blocks from the beach on Australia’s Mornington Peninsula. Built with passive principles in mind, the low-slung structure features double-thick brick walls for thermal massing.
Artist and corrective-exercise specialist, Ruth Hiller, moved to Winter Park, Colorado from New York knowing that her home would be glass and steel with wraparound windows. She hopped on the phone with architect Michael Johnson, he drew the sketch, and it took a mere five minutes to decide on the design. The common areas are suspended and cantilevered over the backyard ravine, offering views of a winding mountain creek while also doubling the square footage. A Bathyscafocus by Focus Creations fireplace warms up the modern abode.
The spacious living room features full-length windows that create a connection with nature. Pink plaster walls were restored to their original condition, as were plywood built-ins.
The upper floor of one of the cabins features a wood-burning stove, beanbag chairs, and a hanging paper lantern.
A brick-inlay fireplace is set into a wall of glass.
The sectional is from Dellarobbia, and the leather chair is the Toro Lounge Chair from Blu Dot. Annie Wise sourced the rugs and accent pillows.
The uninterrupted use of concrete throughout the interior creates a sense of fluidity between spaces.
“The overarching goal was to preserve the rustic character of the original building without making any compromises in terms of modern comfort,” says La Firme. The team hid modern appliances (like the refrigerator) below eye level and worked with the original, century-old structure of The Barn.
The corner of the living area is wrapped in glass.
Natural materials blend with contemporary furnishings in this unique, open living space.
To minimize the home's energy footprint, the floor and foundation are made from cast concrete. Large openings allow for natural ventilation, while surrounding trees help create a cool microclimate. The house is powered by geothermal energy.
The minimalist living room includes built-in seating.
Vintage, one-of-a-kind light fixtures are featured throughout the home. This living room hosted a Target photoshoot last fall, also styled by Emily Henderson.
A bold wood-burning brick fireplace framed by glass anchors the open-plan living space.
The main level living space of Industrial Farmhouse by Christopher Simmond Architect Inc. is a transparent social hub for viewing the rural landscape. The house is situated to optimize views, as well as protect occupants from the blazing summer sun and stiff winter winds.
“The fireplace extends the season,” says Ryall. “The owners probably use that porch six months out of the year.” The design team formed the fireplace’s concrete facade using rough wood boards to give it a rugged texture.
One of the highlights is the sleek, wood-burning fireplace.
Materials such as unpolished stone, used for the interior walls speak louder than statement furniture or décor.
Hatchet Design Build fabricated missing components to complete the casework around a bay window.
A Cold Picnic rug and Coil + Drift mirror warm up a restored fireplace relocated from the basement.
A wood-burning fireplace with a playful house-shaped surround anchors one end of the main living space.
Architect Alex Gil and his wife, Claudia DeSimio, affixed a 750-square-foot addition to the roof of a 19th-century Williamsburg townhouse, transforming their cramped third-floor apartment into a modern duplex. The original fireplace remains, but has been stripped down to exposed brick, as have the surrounding walls, creating an almost wainscot-like design of exposed brick with flat white drywall above.
Scott set the windows into deep recesses.
The living room takes full advantage of the homes' stunning views.
Interior view West
In lieu of a checkerboard effect, Kovel kept his carpet squares all vibrantly verdant. With the bamboo cabinets and countertops the whole space has a pastoral feel. “I wanted it to be like the Bradys’ backyard,” he says.
Throughout the design, the site was quickly revealed as a powerful element of the project. By choosing carefully the location and size of each window, external views were highlighted, and the atmosphere created by natural light is pleasant throughout the whole day. As for the position of the large sliding door, it was “ pushed “ toward the main interior open space with the intention of subtly separating the internal functions while creating a outside protected space. All these intentions ultimately aim to capture the essence of this project: the surrounding nature and wildlife.
Bornstein’s living room features an intriguing collection of furniture. The sofa is made by Swedish manufacturer Ire. The 1970s wood burner was a secondhand store find, and the wood table, by Bruno Mattson, was found in a bin at a recycling station. He inherited the lounge chair from his parents.
The designers explain, “These steel windows played an integral part in making the interior feel larger and more open by blurring the boundaries between the interior and exterior.” A grey Halcyon Lake area rug, an oak chair from MAP, and Hans Wenger Wishbone chairs make for a simple, neutral palette. The painting over the fireplace is by Kate Hendry.
The living room resembles a Sticotti furniture showroom: The architect designed the couch, coffee tables, and stumplike stools. The fireplace is made of stacked stone from San Juan, a nearby province.
Inspired by Russian and Finnish designs, the fireplace harvests hot air by sending it into the basement and radiating it into the room.
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Tehachapi Mountains, California
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
High ceilings and clerestory windows fill the public rooms with light.
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Tehachapi Mountains, California
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
Cash and Rock are shown here in front of a blackened steel “fireplace wall” that was designed by Hufft Projects. Matthew explains how he’s learned to design things that are durable and safe. He continues, “You never realize how destructive kids are until you have them. I’m continuously learning from them and how they interact within architecture.”
To create a clean and minimalist aesthetic, only treated pine plywood and concrete was used in the interiors.
Ray sits at the central hearth on the north end of the comfortable sunken living area. From this perspective, you can see how the interior spaces flow into one another, passing one half-level up into the breakfast nook and kitchen and out from there onto the overgrown hillside. The various built-in furnishings have all been there since the house's construction.
Oak steps lead to the loft bed.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.