Dwell's Favorite 191 Living Room Design Photos And Ideas - Page 2

The designers explain, “These steel windows played an integral part in making the interior feel larger and more open by blurring the boundaries between the interior and exterior.” A grey Halcyon Lake area rug, an oak chair from MAP, and Hans Wenger Wishbone chairs make for a simple, neutral palette. The painting over the fireplace is by Kate Hendry.
Rich and his girlfriend Arielle sit on an IKEA sofa; the windows are from Charleston Glass.
A sliding glass Western Window Systems door dissolves the boundary between indoor and outdoor.
This low-maintenance home near Brisbane, Australia, exemplifies architect James Grose’s design philosophy based around simple, lightweight construction techniques well suited to the region’s subtropical climate.
In this house in the Mornington Peninsula in the south of Melbourne, materials like concrete, natural stone, steel and cedar are perfect backdrops for architecture and interior design firm SJB to use bold colors and edgy midcentury furniture.
Arbel’s projects—both products and architectural commissions—follow a chronological numbering system. The house itself is his 23rd design, while the one-of-a-kind glass pendants that accent nearly every room like a starscape are called “28.”
In the living room, guests gather on a matching ebony sofa and daybed from Hudson and a pair of Jorge Zalszupin lounge chairs. An Yves Klein coffee table—filled with the artist’s signature International Klein Blue pigment— provides a vivid burst amid otherwise organic tones. The walnut-and-bronze cabinetry is a custom design.
Graham Hill, a sustainability advocate whose TED talks have delved into the benefits of living small, put his own lessons into practice at his 350-square-foot apartment, which he shares with his partner and two dogs. Quick transitions, like drawing the FilzFelt curtain, convert the living space into a bedroom.
To highlight the existing architecture of the home, Hill 

retained the dark polish of 

the casement windows, which 

she finds enhances period details instead of undermining 

them. In the rear sunroom, the vintage Case Study furniture pieces with Plexiglas bases are from Metro Retro 

in Houston. 

A Bourgie lamp by Kartell is 

atop an old marble end table by Knoll, and the Gan kilim rug pictures a branch motif echoed in the kitchen and breakfast room.
Protected by an overhang, and floating above ground level, this tertiary space is known in traditional homes as the "engawa." To sustain a unified look throughout, the floor and ceiling are clad in ipe wood.
At the client’s request the kitchen contains neither upper cabinets (Shino can’t reach them) nor an oven (they only used the old one once—to reheat a pizza). A modular Roche Bobois Mah Jong sofa adds a decorative flourish to the living area while maintaining as low a profile as the traditional Japanese furniture.
Architect Grant explains that the recessed orange wall with built-in storage shelving is a counterpoint to the view of Boston in the opposite direction.
The guesthouse has similar built-ins and is outfitted with a reproduction rotating sconce by Serge Mouille and rugs by Stephanie Odegard.
An architectural designer and an artist harnessed the collective power of their design firm to renovate a dilapidated mid-century gem into a hillside perch for their family.

Dieter Rams’s modular 620 Chair Programme, from the 1960s, takes center stage in the Alford-Young family’s living room. The set is accompanied by Artemide’s classic Tolomeo floor lamp and a Portofino Bergère chair that was designed by Rodolfo Dordoni for Minotti. The rolling glass doors running the length of the room are from Fleetwood.

Photo by: Brent Humphreys
Davor and August check out the yard from the living room. “The bifold Vistalite doors allow us to open the house up completely and enjoy the fresh, warm air,” Davor says.
A pair of Molded Plywood lounge chairs by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller sit opposite a BoConcept coffee table and a sofa of Paul’s design. For his father’s book collection, Paul created a library around the double-height staircase.
#TurnbullGriffinHaesloop #interior #livingroom #mezzanine #fan #stair
The plan is super efficient but with gracious moments. This was also family's home for four generations, so preserving the house’s original shape and honoring that history was important factor in the design process.
The most dramatic view in the apartment, the First Presbyterian Church looms large in the Kovel living room.
Weinfeld’s cinematic streak is also evident in the home’s interiors: he designed the entertainment center in the media room. The rug is from  Clatt Carpete & Cia. Throughout the house, the Strozenbergs use floor-to-ceiling curtains for privacy.
Masahiro and Mao Harada of Mount Fuji Architects Studio wanted to break with the traditional definition of a house when they designed this small Tokyo home. They achieved their goal by using the same material for the ceiling, the walls, and the floor, creating a space that flows beautifully. 

Photo by Ryota Atarashi.
Photography by Matthew Millman
Vitra’s Slow chair sits in front of a powder-coated-steel bookcase made by Hill’s go-to fabricator, George Sacaris; it was originally built for the Houston house.
Two pieces from E15’s Shiraz sofa flank 

the company’s wooden Leila side tables. 

Hill chose to use flat paint in Benjamin Moore’s Decorators White throughout the home 

because it emphasizes the chalkiness of the plaster walls, making them “look almost like slate.” The sconce shown in the foreground—David Chipperfield’s Corrubedo design for 

FontanaArte—gives off a soft glow and 

replaces the dozens of paper-lampshade 

wall fixtures the owners found in the house when they bought it. Stewart Cohen’s 

zany photograph of a gun-toting Marfa 

resident encapsulates Barbara Hill’s offbeat brand of decorating: bright and minimal, 

yet darkly humorous.
Cho relaxes in the first-floor living room, where paintings by up-and-coming Germany-based Chinese artist Ruo Bing Chen play off a sofa and coffee table designed by the architect himself.
The large patio leads to a newly landscaped back garden. An expansive glass wall promotes seamless indoor-outdoor living. Inexpensive brick pavers were chosen for the rear patio; they offer textural contrast with the steel of the door, brick of the rear facade, and pale gray wood of the interior floors.
Cubic bookshelves do double duty as a dividing wall and as a sliding door.
“We’re trying to pretend this is our little ray of sunshine in the middle of Portland,” says Jennifer, with Mattias and Moa (right), of the couple’s Eichleresque abode. The sofa is by Florence Knoll for Knoll.
The table’s base, which itself is an additional storage container, rolls easily into place to support the surface.
Orpilla and Alexander’s first furniture purchase, a Christopher Deam credenza, now inspires a much larger collection of furniture.
Living and Library
A loveseat and two Neo arm chairs by Niels Bendtsen in the living room offer Blauvelt a light-filled view to the courtyard beyond.
The living room resembles a Sticotti furniture showroom: The architect designed the couch, coffee tables, and stumplike stools. The fireplace is made of stacked stone from San Juan, a nearby province.
In the living room of the Barcelona apartment designer Elina Vila D’Acosta-Calheiros shares with her husband, Ginés Gorriz, Arne Jacobsen Swan chairs join a sofa by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani. The cabinet is from Cappellini, as is the Marcel Wanders Big Shadow lamp.
Dieter Rams’s modular 620 Chair Programme, from the 1960s, takes center stage in the Alford-Young family’s living room. The set is accompanied by Artemide’s classic Tolomeo floor lamp and a Portofino Bergère chair that was designed by Rodolfo Dordoni for Minotti. The rolling glass doors running the length of the room are from Fleetwood.
The pillows, wooden animal figures, and tray-top side table near the large window.
All furniture is made of oak wood except the staircase volume made entirely of black steel.
Rodriguez, a designer and architect who runs the studio Agi Miagi, created the pendant lamp and terrariums in the dining area. The space is open to the living area, where Brown’s son, Hugo, sits on a Living Divani sofa. The countertop-table is by Bercy Chen Studio.
A Jens Risom side chair centers the living room, which looks across the courtyard to the bedroom pavilion.
A Penobscot Bay swing hangs beside the dining table in the porch.
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Rockport, Massachusetts
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
Inspired by Russian and Finnish designs, the fireplace harvests hot air by sending it into the basement and radiating it into the room.
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Tehachapi Mountains, California
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
“We were researching places where we could get fake old beams, but at the last minute, the contractor found some from a barn that was coming down,
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North Hatley, Quebec
Dwell Magazine : July / August 2017
A Potence wall lamp by Jean Prouvé and a Dioscuri table lamp by Michele De Lucchi for Artemide illuminate the living area, which includes a Wire Base Elliptical Table by Charles and Ray Eames.
Cash and Rock are shown here in front of a blackened steel “fireplace wall” that was designed by Hufft Projects. Matthew explains how he’s learned to design things that are durable and safe. He continues, “You never realize how destructive kids are until you have them. I’m continuously learning from them and how they interact within architecture.”
To create a clean and minimalist aesthetic, only treated pine plywood and concrete was used in the interiors.
Old Herman Miller posters hang on a nearby wall. In the living room, a yellow fiberglass stool by Nanna Ditzel sits alongside a French chain-link floor lamp from the 1940s.
Living room daybed and fireplace composition.
Ray sits at the central hearth on the north end of the comfortable sunken living area. From this perspective, you can see how the interior spaces flow into one another, passing one half-level up into the breakfast nook and kitchen and out from there onto the overgrown hillside. The various built-in furnishings have all been there since the house's construction.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.