Dwell’s Favorite 421 Living Room Design Photos And Ideas - Page 2

All of the exterior furnishings are from Fermob. The wood-burning fireplace anchors the open living-dining space.
A custom sofa was installed on the far side of the bathroom for even more space to relax.
The mountain abode is nestled on a quiet street a mere 10 minutes from the slopes, and it shares its lot with a gathering of large trees. The house also comfortably accommodates up to 10 people, so it's perfect for hosting friends and their families.
The four-bed, four-bath home of Peter and Sarah Diamond and their two adult children is uniquely situated in one of the most remote areas of the Berkshires: Mount Washington, Massachusetts.
After searching for the perfect plot of land on which to build their dream home, a couple instead opted to purchase a "Rummer" home -- a typical example of a low-key midcentury modernist house constructed by a local developer, Robert Rummer, in the 1960s. The five-bedroom, 2,400-square-foot post-and-beam house was strongly reminiscent of California Eichlers, and exemplified the couple’s ideal layout, but was in serious need of a major renovation. The revamp maintained the great expanses of glass, wide-open interiors, and indoor-outdoor living, and added new white concrete floors installed, fixed the radiant heating, updated the kitchen and bathrooms, and new landscaping.
Native Texans and married designers Elizabeth Alford and Michael Young came home to roost 10 years ago, when they ditched big-city life in New York for a ranch house in Austin. The couple immediately knew that the home, originally built by architect Jonathan Bowman in 1957, would need a remodel, but realized that a complete restoration would be too costly and perhaps "not that satisfying" for the designers to work solely within the existing structure. So they stripped it down to the footprint and rebuilt, shaping a family home that would reflect both the hypermodern lives they left in New York City and the deep-rooted cultural heritage that comes with growing up in Texas.
In defiance of its oversized neighbors, this sustainable 753-square-foot home in Perth, by architecture firm Whispering Smith, maximizes its small footprint through built-in furniture and textures of concrete, reclaimed brick, tile, and white metal. Devoid of walls and doors, the streamlined spaces flow into one another, and connect to the ample rear courtyard.
In the living area, sofas and a chair by Piero Lissoni for Cassina join a floor lamp by Michele de Lucchi for Artemide.
The refined architectural detailing is finished with natural textures and subtle color shifts, from clay brickwork to rose linen accents, creating a robust yet calming home.
Lovely details in living room
Loft Space
The sunken lounge was designed with "slowing down and appreciating the environment" in mind. A custom-made, built-in sofa wraps around the space, bleeding into the stairs and a custom wood display shelf. Not having a TV was an intentional choice. "We wanted the client to be able to lie back and watch the clouds and the sky, to have conversations, to read a book, to play with their pets," says Knights.
The fundamentals of Emmanuel de Bayser’s Berlin apartment toe the line of cool, muted modern design. Yet there’s a trick at play: by adding distinct shots of color, de Bayser gives every room its own richly hued rainbow and, in doing so, creates a personal paean to the more playful side of midcentury design.
Architecture doesn’t have to mean building anew. Sometimes, it can mean removing things in order to rediscover an authenticity that centuries of meddling has obscured. In Milan, the private residence of Vincenzo De Cotiis is one such project; an homage to the raw beauty of an 18th-century space, which reflects the architect’s overarching fascination with aging objects.
The strips of cedar on the ceiling that fan out from the ridge beam are “meant to evoke the canopy of the surrounding conifers,” says the firm. The built-in cabinetry throughout is Sapele.
A more narrow window focuses the eye on tree trunks, creating an “abstracted view of the landscape,” says the firm.
The family cat, Rey, steps in front of the concrete fireplace in the living room. Floor-to-ceiling windows enhance the indoor-outdoor connection.
Houston-based designer Barbara Hill is known for a stripped-down aesthetic that blends art-world cachet with Texas modernism. Vitra’s Slow chair sits in front of a powder-coated-steel bookcase made by Hill’s go-to fabricator, George Sacaris; it was originally built for the Houston house.
“Instead of using a typical frame system, we created frameless windows by burying aluminum channels into the floors and walls,” says Richard. “It kept our glazing budget much lower than normal.” The sofas feature custom upholstery by Inverse Project and HDM.
Plants adorn the edge of the lofted bedroom.
Having worked most of her life on a sheep farm, Claire is well educated, intelligent and unfailingly loyal. Now getting on in years and officially retired, she still skips like a pup in the mornings when it's time for a walk. The original Victorian weatherboard facade has been carefully restored and a modern and spacious two-story timber-clad building added at the back. Travertine floors integrate the internal and external areas.
The open living/dining area gives a good impression of Tas’s catholic approach to decorating, which includes mixing Panton chairs with antiques and homemade pieces.
The glass-enclosed living area is furnished with Scandia chairs and a Fjordfiesta table.
The red niche is the most vibrant space in the home. Cibic says, “I like to spend time in these small little intimate spaces. It’s like one piece of furniture somehow.”
An architectural designer and an artist harnessed the collective power of their design firm to remake a dilapidated mid-century gem into a hillside perch for their family.
San Francisco’s modernists were faced with the issue of building within a firmly established stylistic tradition—think bay windows and gingerbread. Henry Hill’s 1947 renovation of a 1908 Victorian tucked away on an alley in historic Russian Hill provides a remarkable response to the dilemma.
The backsplash is a tarnished sheet of bronze. Raft Stools by Norm Architects provide understated seating.
In the living room, the custom sectional is from Village Interiors and the rug is from Turabi Rug Gallery.
In the living room, Fred sits beneath Tom Wesselmann’s Claire’s Valentine Banner, from 1973. A George Nelson Yellow Marshmallow sofa from 1956 joins a Darrell Landrum coffee table, also from the 1950s, and a pair of Verner Panton Cone chairs.
Since Josep and Encarna wanted to live on a single level, Tapias removed part of the mas’s second floor to create a double-height space. Pendants by Faro Barcelona hang near the balcony Mas. The ground floor, designed to be flexible, currently holds offices for the couple, a library, a living room, and a piano for their teenage daughter. The terrazzo floors are original to the house.
The dining room features a tongue-and- groove Douglas fir ceiling. Original built-ins include a mahogany bench anchored between cabinets whose fronts tilt at the house’s signature 15-degree angle.
The master bedroom, previously a little dormer, has been expanded to include a massive corner window that captures the Golden Gate Bridge, Bay Bridge, and Richmond Bridge on clear days. A rug by Aelfie Oudghiri for CB2, wool-wrapped pouf by CB2, and vintage chaise by Maarten van Severen creates an impressive lounge area.
Rachel Nolan and Steven Farrell’s weekend house is located a couple of blocks from the beach on Australia’s Mornington Peninsula. Built with passive principles in mind, the low-slung structure features double-thick brick walls for thermal massing.
Clad in textured timber, the interior ceilings allow the structural material to speak for itself, while also providing a warm contrast to the minimal design.
Each home that Wright designed was unique to its circumstances, and the Penfield House was no exception. Set on 30 acres in Lake County, Ohio, the 1950 home has taller ceilings and an elongated profile to accommodate the client Louis Penfield—who was six foot eight.
The modern steel staircase adds a striking architectural element to the space and leads from the ground-floor living spaces to the bedrooms upstairs.
The light-filled living area is dressed with a Vipp Shelter lounge stol (available in Fall 2019), the Vipp Loft Sofa ($6,795), and a Vipp Floor Reading Lamp ($600).
Designed for “utilizing every cubic centimeter to its utmost,” the compact cabin feels large thanks to full-height glazing and clean, minimalist design.
The original brick fireplace stands as a reminder of the home’s history.
Warm wood accents form a common thread that connects each room.
Instead of peering into the homes of neighbors, residents revel in nature.
In addition to housing the garage, the ground floor features an open living room, a dining area and kitchen, a half bath, and a flush wall of cabinetry for storage.
Artist and corrective-exercise specialist, Ruth Hiller, moved to Winter Park, Colorado from New York knowing that her home would be glass and steel with wraparound windows. She hopped on the phone with architect Michael Johnson, he drew the sketch, and it took a mere five minutes to decide on the design. The common areas are suspended and cantilevered over the backyard ravine, offering views of a winding mountain creek while also doubling the square footage. A Bathyscafocus by Focus Creations fireplace warms up the modern abode.
Designed by local architect Pedro Domingos, this four-bedroom abode in Portugal opens up with whitewashed concrete walls and geometric forms. Integrated amongst hundreds of olive, almond, and cork trees on a site that once held ancient ruins, the space opens up to the landscape with an array of patios, rooftop terraces, and large central courtyard with swimming pool. The midcentury fireplace seen here was designed in 1965 by Spanish architects Alfonso Mila and Federico Correa.
Spaces are kept minimal to instill a sense of serenity. A Pilotta chair from Cassina is the only piece of furniture other than the built-in bench.
The spacious living room features full-length windows that create a connection with nature. Pink plaster walls were restored to their original condition, as were plywood built-ins.
Located on a narrow site, Living Screen House by CplusC Architectural Workshop features a unique lap pool abutting a double-height social space. Living green wall screens to the front and side façades provide privacy.
What was once a poorly planned floor plan has transformed into open, brightly lit living spaces at the hub of the home.
In this updated 1950s Portland home, a light gray Neo sofa by Bensen harmonizes with warm wooden walls, ceilings, and floors, as well as a red-and-mustard-yellow vintage rug.
The upper floor of one of the cabins features a wood-burning stove, beanbag chairs, and a hanging paper lantern.
The existing wood structure and ceiling of the former saloon were completely refinished, and the exposed rafters were painted white for a brighter and more spacious feel. The old windows, floors, and finishes were replaced to create consistency with the new house.
Nelson De Coninck's space is an airy, art-filled sanctuary.
Luxe glam exuds
Large decks and walls of glass blur the boundaries between indoor/outdoor living.
“An important part of the work was to design large common spaces, and to be able to receive a large number of people,” note the architects. “The common spaces are designed for the coexistence between family and friends.”
A slender, black double-sided fireplace distinguishes the living room from the dining area.
Inside Fallingwater on iconichouses.org

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.