200 Exterior Shed Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

Pig Rock Bothy and Inshriach Bothy are tow of the handcrafted structures that inspire artists who use it a residency spaces.
A home in Hudson Valley, New York.
“The geometry of the roof transforms from a typical pitched gable on the short northeast façade, to a flat roof on the opposite southwest facade. This transition creates a dynamic arrangement of folding roof planes,” says Ampuero Ernst.
Honka’s Kippari log homes come with large windows that are perfect for framing beautiful natural sceneries.
A "raked roof" promotes daylighting, while a 6Kw photovoltaic solar array with 4.8Kw battery storage generates clean energy. The front porch encourages socializing with the neighbors.
The home hovers above the ground on concrete bases, so as not to intrude too heavily on the natural landscape. Note the red hatch door from the loft bedroom that can be lowered.
The home features materials, cabinetry, and plants salvaged from homes slated to be demolished.
The home's minimalist construction includes a mix of unfinished and charred plywood to form a simple two-story volume with a slightly sloping roof and cantilevered bedroom loft with clerestory windows made from polycarbonate panels.
The entrance to the bunkhouse.
A home overlooking Clearwater River in Idaho.
Inspired by the traditional shingle-clad homes in the neighborhood, this prefab home in Seattle was based off a base design by Method Homes and then customized by Grouparchitect to accommodate the client’s needs and a unique site. Doors were widened, a rear porch was enclosed for an additional bedroom, and specialized storage including an enlarged laundry room, a generous pantry, and built-in cubbies for each member of the family were added.
This wilderness sauna cabin in the west coast of Finland was built with 112-millimeter thick squrae logs, and has a 1,028-square-foot outdoor terrace.
The exterior of Kide, a sauna cabin in the west coast of Finland.
A close-up of the black-weathered zinc cladding. Angled walls and an opening in the eave preserves the mature trees on the site.
Hard shell, soft core. The industrial exterior shell wraps up and over the warm interior of the great room.
A standing seam metal roof wraps down the exterior wall of the home to protect against the harsh winds of the terrain.
A large window wall folds in to create a spacious deck that wraps up and over to become the roof and overhang of the home.
Paved walkways connect each unit to the public spaces.
The site needed a path that would let residents easily ascend from the bank to the house. The architects created one by simply replicating the way they had naturally walked up the site the first time they visited. The result is a meandering trail that directs visitors to the landscape’s different features — whether a majestic Arbutus tree, a private stone beach, or a wildflower clearing.
Grays and oranges compliment the natural tones of the site.
The stainless steel column is set outboard of the envelope to allow for a corner opening wall system.
The taller mass holds the sleeping spaces, while the living and gathering spaces are located in the lower elements.
In order to take advantage of the sun, the outdoor patio, opening wall system, and lawn were located on the southern side of the residence.
Minimal materials allow the dwelling to blend kindly into the surroundings, while large amounts of glazing increase the connection between built form and nature.
OFIS arhitekti + AKT II + Harvard GSD Students, Alpine Shelter Skuta Mountain
North of Sydney on Dangar Island is a modern Australian vacation rental that's positioned to take full advantage of views of the Hawkesbury River and gorgeous native Angophora trees.
A wide, open-air, stone-paved corridor connects two volumes.
The configuration of the home is playful in plan, yet allows the structure to create minimal impact on the surrounding topography.
Large spans of glass look out on the surrounding lush vegetation.
Bold and bright colors on the interior pop against the subtle tones of the exterior.
Slanted roof planes create opportunity for drawing daylight in further, while creating a sculptural architectural form.
Living room at night
With the majority of the house's windows facing down the slope, not only does Bornstein maximize the views out, but he assured that his home would have loads of natural light pouring in, even if it only lasts for a few hours in winter.
Exterior view showing warped roof plane over living space
Exterior view showing meadow in front of the house and Goat Wall behind the house
Exterior Detail
This  house in Three River, California, has no Internet or television, which makes it ideal for a digital detox.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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