702 Exterior Shed Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The cedar cladding was inspired by the towering mature oaks on the property.
The 400-square-foot work studio that architect Bulent Baydar, of Harrison Design, designed for Virginia-based screenwriter Matthew Michael Carnahan features NanaWall doors that fold open and connect the interior to the natural surroundings.
The studio is clad with cedar, glass, and a sloping, standing-seam metal roof.
The materiality of the home is deeply rooted in the immediate natural environment; exterior walls are composed of stone and cedar sourced from the site.
Above the grass shingled roof, the protruding glass enclosure is an alluring portal to the dwelling beneath. Surrounding the glass lookout, 50 unique species of wild plants blanket the surface.
Tucked into the hillside of a southern sloping site, the stepped design finds a balance between sunshine and ventilation. Native plants become a part of the home’s living envelope, "in order to make it look like the earth has been lifted up as it is," explains Nakamura.
A living roof was carefully populated with indigenous plants and flowers. After functional considerations such as waterproofing and drainage were addressed by the contractor, Mitsuko Suzuki of the Shiiaru Club brought in native plants. "The soil is also mixed with the original soil, taking into account drainage and weight," adds Nakamura.
The firm streamlined the window plan for the apartment above the garage.
Living in a remote cabin poses challenges in the cold winter months. “The latest challenge is keeping the two 1000-liter backup rainwater tanks in the shed at the back of the house from freezing,” says the owner. “I experimented this winter with installing a doc-fan ventilation system in the connecting wall that pushes heat from inside the house to the shed to keep it hovering just above freezing point.”
Locally milled cypress siding, a naturally rot-resistant wood, will darken over time.
Solar panels populate the upper roof, and a double-height atrium in the middle helps to break up the home's massing.
A covered front porch spills out to the yard and anchors the house to the site.
The owner is a freelance documentary filmmaker who found that city living was stifling his creativity. “I have always been more creative in a vast space,” he says. “So, being surrounded by wilderness really attracted me.” It was important that the surrounding forest not be dramatically impacted by the build, and only five trees were removed during the construction.
The owner was motivated to build his own home to avoid a mortgage and to gain the know-how to undertake his own maintenance and repairs. “I was craving the personal challenge to cultivate a home for myself,” he says. “As it was the beginning of a new adventure, I wanted it to be personal. Also, practically speaking, if I built each piece of the home by hand, I would have a good sense of how to solve problems or improve it, without having to ask anyone else to journey through the forest, down the trail, and up the cliff to make an adjustment.”
A timber palette emphasizes indoor/outdoor living. The outdoor cedar deck visually extends the interior white oak floors. The ceilings and soffits are made of hemlock.
Designed for energy efficiency, the home features insulation above code and hydronic radiant heating. Note the Morso 6148 wood-burning stove in the entry hall that’s fueled by locally felled lumber.
Completed in 2018 on a 2.6-acre site in the San Juan Islands, the two-bedroom modular home was installed in a day.
All lightHouses come with custom OxBox (oxidized steel) and Barn (wood) siding, as well as a collection of unique exterior steel features.
The first Plant Prefab–built modular lightHouse ADU was completed earlier this spring in Sebastopol, California. This 423-square-foot lightHouse was completed for around $285,000. That figure breaks down to approximate costs of $210,000 for design, engineering and production; $60,000 for infrastructure and site work; and $15,000 for shipping and installation.
The trapezoid-shaped addition hosts a new master suite on the main level.
The team preserved the deck, but installed a new railing.
On the first story, the walls facing the carport are entirely opaque for total privacy.
The home’s board-formed concrete exterior walls exude a rustic, imperfect quality.
Tall trees and an extended roof canopy provide the house with plenty of privacy.
From the street, the house is shielded from inquisitive eyes.
A tall tree grows through a large aperture in the mono-pitched roof, bringing an outdoor feel to the inside of the house.
The home’s simple, abstract shape contrasts with neighboring homes, which are mainly clad in terra-cotta roof tiles.
The mono-pitched roof is made from timber battens and Lysaght Kip-lock steel roofing.
After finding paradise on a Hawaiian papaya farm, filmmaker Jess Bianchi and jewelry designer Malia Grace Mau tapped San Francisco artist Jay Nelson and a team from the Outer Sunset to design and build their dream home in just five weeks. Located just one block from the beach, the home takes inspiration from laid-back surf shacks and is mainly built with reclaimed wood.
Constructed with sustainably sourced lumber and large, double-pane windows, Studio Shed’s all-season Signature Series units are popularly used as backyard offices.
The architects designed the home so that it can be extended toward the south without altering the landscape.
“The apparent simplicity of prefabricated systems hides a lot of the preparation effort to make them work,” says Gonçalves.
Each unit has a private entrance on the west side of the building. Half of the units are long-term rentals, while the other half serve the short-term tourist market.
“Designed and licensed as a collective housing building, the project offers individual entrances and complete acoustic separation between the different units," says the firm.
Half of the ground floor is currently leased by a bakery, while the other half is left open as an events space.
With over 7,500 square feet of space, the flexible ground floor can be used as one large space or subdivided into differently sized rooms.
The living spaces are set back to create space for an outdoor balcony and a roof overhang that protects the interior from unwanted solar gain.
The concrete modules were prefabricated off-site and fitted with insulation, electrical sockets and switches, technical rails, and all mechanical connectors before they were transported to the site for final assembly.
“The shed roof has a very functionalist intention. As a prefab and modular system, Gomos is supposed to be produced in a place and shipped and installed in many different locations,” says Gonçalves. “So we wanted to ensure that it would work well even if it’s assembled in a place with severe rainfall or snow.”
All components were prefabricated in a factory and quickly assembled on-site. The system “performs at once as structure, insulation, and cladding elements,” says Gonçalves. The assembly process took eight months in total.
A view of the parklike retreat from the backyard pool shows how the glass-enclosed entryway connects the living and sleeping areas.
"The use of materials, the careful details, the integrated sense of place, the weaving together of inside and out, and creating a special home that the clients love make this a special story for me," Epstein notes fondly.
As night falls, the home lights up like a lantern, enhancing the warm glow of the wood ceiling. Immense clerestory windows and glass sliders connect the home to the outdoors.
Built to commune with its scenic surroundings, this sustainable home embodies understated luxury.
In the evening, interior lighting interacts with the polycarbonate pergola that extends from the front, creating a lantern-like glow.
The triangular structural support system continues on the exterior.
A pergola made of opaque, corrugated polycarbonate extends from the front facade and guards against bright sunlight, wind, and rain.
The backyard studio that architect Gerald Parsonson designed to expand a young family’s living space features a wraparound deck that connects the hideaway to the garden.
Rainwater runoff is collected in a bucket.
A metal chimney allows heat escape from the sauna's wood stove.
For Melbourne Design Week 2020, Sydney-based art and architecture collective Studio Rain created Atmosphere: A Revival, a sauna installation along the picturesque Yarra River meant to revive bathing culture.
Based in Asheville, Deltec Homes is one of the best-known prefabricated and kit home designers—and they’re particularly renowned for producing energy-efficient, hurricane-resistant homes. Deltec’s Ridgeline model (above) is designed to maximize energy efficiency, and it consumes two-thirds less energy than a typical home.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.