550 Exterior Stone Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

A Genesis GV80 sits in front of the deep-set, two-story garage of the Foust Residence.

Preproduction model with optional features shown.
Preproduction model with optional features shown.
The bouquet canyon stone pays tribute to the midcentury-modern era when the home was built.
Project designer Wayne Chevalier kept automobile elegance in mind as he remodeled the Malibu Crest residence. Here, he exits a Genesis GV80 parked in front of the garage.

Preproduction model with optional features shown.
The original stone facade of the farmhouse was left intact to preserve its rural character.
The farmhouse, originally built in 1894, is now a recognized cultural heritage site.
A new cedar and glass dining pavilion extends through the back of a weekend retreat in rural Ontario designed by architect Brian O'Brian for Ben Sykes and Erin Connor. The 19th-century timber and stone structure, formerly a one-room schoolhouse, proved to be the perfect palimpsest for a modern intervention.
People stop us and say, ‘Oh, I went to school here,’ or, ‘My mom went here,’ and they’re so glad we’ve restored the building,” says Ben.
A look at the building exterior before the renovation.
The exposed concrete framework cantilevers dramatically from the stone walls.
"In a sense, we treated earth as one of our materials," says Vaitsos. "We figured out how much earth we needed to excavate in order to position this house here. And then we used it to transform the landscape a little bit." This was done to create as little waste as possible.
Each cell denotes a different area inside the house below it and is planted with a different species of aromatic plant from which essential oils can be extracted. The landscaped roof also helps to insulate the home and blend it into the environment.
The circular insertions are custom operable skylights that allow for daylighting and passive cooling.
The Orchard Corral is just below the house, and is home to a large grove of olive trees for olive oil and white wine production. Many of the island restaurants serve the olive oil.
Home Studio by Manuel Cervantes Estudio #DwellDesignAwards2020
The three-story home, which keeps a low profile at its entrance before sloping downward, is clad in basalt quarried from the site itself.
Located on a steeply sloping site near Bronte Beach, the Tree House is perfectly sited for Madeleine’s outdoorsy family.
The windows and doors feature an extruded aluminum-clad exterior that is finished with a durable 70% PVDF fluoropolymer coating in a Rustic color. The look is contrasted by light-colored stone covering the poolside patio.
The island home occupies a mountainside lot overlooking the beach and water. The construction utilized indigenous materials as much as possible, including fossilized coral, local volcanic stone, bamboo, and Wallaba wood shingles.
Scottish author J. M. Barrie spent summers on the island of Eilean Shona in northwestern Scotland. A free ferry service from the mainland brings you to the island's shores, where multiple restored structures—including this old schoolhouse—await your stay.
"Being up against the side of the hill gives the garden a lot of shelter and creates a warm microclimate," King says. "This allows a broad range of local species to flower alongside non-native species such as a lemon and olives trees in pots which can be brought into the Reading Room during the cooler months."
The library’s charred timber cladding contrasts with the pale limestone of the adjacent existing house.
The garden library that architect George King designed to accompany a 17th-century limestone house and its surrounding gardens in England is clad with charred timber and large glass doors that slide open and connect the structure to the outdoors.
This is where the Italian Villages project started three years ago: The first house to be restored was Casa Greco, a medieval building that was damaged by an earthquake. Located at the far end of the village, it offers spectacular views over the surrounding valley.
Aalto was not only responsible for the architecture and the furnishings—he also designed the landscaping.
An exterior view of Maison Louis Carré as it delicately integrates into the surrounding landscape.
Aalto designed Maison Louis Carré with an immense lean-to roof made of blue Normandy slate, "pitched in imitation of the landscape itself". The facade is built from white bricks and marble, while the base and parts of the walls are Chartres limestone.
MidCentury Modern Summer Home in Gibson Island, MD
Exterior Side View with Outdoor Pool and Patio
“We really wanted to capture the ruinous quality of this old building rather than do something overtly new,” says Greg Blee, founding partner at Blee Halligan Architects. Before construction could begin, however, he and Halligan had to patch the remaining walls using stones found in the nearby river. Wherever a wall had collapsed, the designers inserted framing to create windows and doors. For the roof, they turned to the original tiles. “My father’s terrible at throwing things away,” Blee says. “We took the tiles off 30 years ago, as it was too dangerous to have them up there. They’ve been sitting in the fields ever since, and this was our last chance to use them.”
The house is hidden from the road and sits on a hilltop clearing that overlooks the rolling farmland of the Mississippi River bluffs in Western Wisconsin. From this vantage point, there is a 270-degree view, with dramatic sunsets over the distant hills.
The home is a study in how to receive light throughout the day—from sunrise to sunset. The master bedroom’s windows frame the sunrise and welcome in morning light.
The living room leads to a terrace with a grill that allows the clients to cook and entertain outside while enjoying the picturesque site.
The sections of flat roof were economical to build, which allowed the use of high-quality wood shingles on the pitched roofs. Stone piers support the south-side trellis, emphasizing the home’s rustic inspiration.
The home consists of three cottage-inspired forms that are connected by a more contemporary, flat-roofed central structure. “One of the main challenges was how to bring the competing aesthetics the clients desired—they sought a simple, historical vernacular architecture with a more contemporary aesthetic,” says architect Matthew Erickson.
During the renovation, Chu extended the bathroom next to the master bedroom outwards to create a bath and shower room that blurs the boundaries between interior and exterior. He also added a skylight made from a repurposed car sunroof, which was purchased secondhand for $100 and could be operated by remote control to easily let the elements in. “There were many challenges in what we wanted to do,” says Chu. “Then, we searched for materials and ways of doing that—or we let the site inspire us.”
The sliding front door is made of glass panels, and its bright red color was inspired by the red doors (symbolic of fortune and prosperity) found in traditional villages in Taiwan. “We wanted the front door to be transparent so that light filters into the interior even when the door is closed,” says Chu. “It was very important to have a constant relationship between inside and outside.”
"When summer comes around, it gets progressively nestled in the forest, without ever losing views of the vineyard below," says Timothee.
"15% of those stones are from the original house," says Timothee. "We dismantled the existing structure looking out for those rare elements, which were then added to the masonry once the foundations were poured."
Architect Timothee Mercier of Studio XM converted a crumbling farmhouse into a residence for his parents.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.