53 Exterior Stone Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

The positioning of the home’s roof allowed for a double-height, north-facing wall with four matching windows and an accompanying skylight. “The house refers to rural houses: a sloping roof, completely coated by stone and with no eaves,” Vanotti says.
Reinforced concrete stands behind the stone facade to provide insulation. Vanotti wanted to focus this project on the simple materials of concrete, natural larch, iron, and wood.
The two-foot-thick stacked stone walls constructed by Reed Hilderbrand nod to the masonry-free walls common in Revolutionary-era New England.
West Face on Approach
Front
Front
The cabin’s exterior walls and roof are clad in overlapping stone plates that mimic the look of traditional wood paneling found in Western Norway. “It provides an affinity with the cabins nearby,” partner and architect Nils Ole Bae Brandtzæg explains. Solar panels cover the chimney pipe, lighting LED lamps inside.
Edgewood House
Mill Valley, CA
Edgewood House
Mill Valley, CA
Edgewood House
Mill Valley, CA
The only clue to the property's past life are the train tracks which traverse the garden.
Villa H | street view
this is the South facing front of the home
this is the North facing side of the home
the back east facing side of the house
The house is built into the hillside but its top floor entrance is level with the street. The stone wall provides privacy while the garage and a pedestrian walkway—seen exact center, by the tree—bridge the gap.
"We really wanted to capture the ruinous quality of this old building rather than do something overtly new," Blee says. Before construction could begin, however, he and Halligan had to patch the remaining walls using stones found in the nearby river. Wherever a wall had collapsed, the designers inserted framing to create windows and doors. For the roof, they turned to the original tiles. "My father's terrible at throwing things away," Blee says. "We took the tiles off 30 years ago, as it was too dangerous to have them up there. They've been sitting in the fields ever since, and this was out last chance to use them."
The building takes advantage of passive heating and cooling, thanks to Blee and Halligan's strategic design to capture the most sunlight in the winter and provide the most shade in the summer. The above-ground glass facade faces east and draws in the daylight, but when the sun proves too strong, whoever is staying in the structure can close the internal shutters to beat the heat.
Having purchased the land from a friend who also has a house in the community, Schneider had a better sense of what she wanted—and what she didn't—her site. "From the experience at the neighbor's house," Foster says, "she knew she didn't want the house to have its back to the morning sun so we created a deck and somewhere to sit outside that faces east."

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The thermal massing absorbs heat during the day and releases it through the evening.
The Casa Cuatro sits above a 180-foot cliff that overlooks the Pacific Ocean. The locally quarried stone makes the house blend in with the landscape and acts as a thermal-mass wall, absorbing heat during the day and releasing it through the evening.
Front View
Front Facade
Rear Facade
Looking like a burrow on the side of a mountain, Villa Vals – a Swiss holiday rental available through Boutique Homes was designed by Architects Bjarne Mastenbroek of SeARCH and Christian Müller of CMA. The entrance to the property is through a nearby wooden barn, which has a concealed underground tunnel that runs through the mountain into the villa’s subterranean core.
Local limestone, ample daylighting, natural ventilation and deep overhangs serve to connect the house to its context through its materiality and ease of opening up the exterior.
Michèle Monory’s Chinon farmhouse is an idyllic getaway from her home basein Paris. After she inherited the property and centuries-old structure from her father, she hired Matali Crasset, who runs a cutting-edge architecture and design firm, to update the living spaces.
 The main level of the Franklin Mountain House is built with volcanic rock basalt and granite from the region.

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