Introducing Our 2016 Young Guns

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By Aileen Kwun and Dwell
A global look at designers to watch.

For 21st-century designers, visibility isn’t just a virtue, it’s part and parcel of a successful career in an interconnected world, where product launches and visual inspiration are found and shared with the click of a button. Creativity is a difficult professional endeavor to tackle, which is why the 2016 edition of our annual Young Guns feature is both a celebration of some of the best work we’ve seen, and an endorsement of some of the best ideas we’d like to see realized. In the following profiles, we spotlight emerging talent from around the world—representing 16 cities, 13 countries, and 5 continents—as well as student work from some of today’s leading design schools.


Meet our 2016 class of Young Guns

Products/Furniture
Yinka Ilori
(London, United Kingdom)
Sabine Marcelis
(Rotterdam, Netherlands)
Benwu Studio
(Beijing and Shanghai, China)
Thom Fougere
(Winnipeg, Canada)
Jonas Edvard
(Copenhagen, Denmark)

Graphics
Felix Pfäffli
(Lucerne, Switzerland)
Kristina Krogh
(Copenhagen, Denmark) 

Interiors
Crosby Studio
(Moscow, Russia)
Joa Herrenknecht (Berlin, Germany) 

Craft
Heidi Jalkh
(Buenos Aires, Argentina)
Driaan Claassen
(Cape Town, South Africa) 

Textiles
Shore Rugs
(London, United Kingdom)
Sara Berks
(Germantown, New York)

Tech
Coralie Gourguechon
(Treviso, Italy)
Marjan van Aubel
(London, United Kingdom) 

Conversation Starters
Martine Syms
(Los Angeles, California)
Zoe Alexander Fisher
(Brooklyn, New York)

Introducing Our 2016 Young Guns - Photo 1 of 1 - Well-versed in digital illustration, the Reykjavík-based designer Siggi Odds and his studio Børk look to quilts as a tactile medium for their designs. Production stalled despite a successful launch of prototypes in 2014—but we’re still hoping to see these digitally printed pieces, inspired by Icelandic landscapes and folklore, launched to market.

Well-versed in digital illustration, the Reykjavík-based designer Siggi Odds and his studio Børk look to quilts as a tactile medium for their designs. Production stalled despite a successful launch of prototypes in 2014—but we’re still hoping to see these digitally printed pieces, inspired by Icelandic landscapes and folklore, launched to market.

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