676 Exterior Prefab Design Photos And Ideas

All lightHouses come with custom OxBox (oxidized steel) and Barn (wood) siding, as well as a collection of unique exterior steel features.
The first Plant Prefab–built modular lightHouse ADU was completed earlier this spring in Sebastopol, California. This 423-square-foot lightHouse was completed for around $285,000. That figure breaks down to approximate costs of $210,000 for design, engineering and production; $60,000 for infrastructure and site work; and $15,000 for shipping and installation.
Pictured is a rendering of a 570-square-foot 2X lightHouse with a one-bedroom unit stacked atop a two-car garage.
The Buhaus includes a living/sleeping area with a kitchenette, a bathroom, and an outdoor deck. Each unit can be completed within three to four months.
The cedar-wrapped house, designed by BriggsKnowles A+D, is gently curved at the center.
These prefab ADUs are the perfect solution for those in need of a separate home office.
Constructed with sustainably sourced lumber and large, double-pane windows, Studio Shed’s all-season Signature Series units are popularly used as backyard offices.
“The apparent simplicity of prefabricated systems hides a lot of the preparation effort to make them work,” says Gonçalves.
Each unit has a private entrance on the west side of the building. Half of the units are long-term rentals, while the other half serve the short-term tourist market.
“Designed and licensed as a collective housing building, the project offers individual entrances and complete acoustic separation between the different units," says the firm.
With over 7,500 square feet of space, the flexible ground floor can be used as one large space or subdivided into differently sized rooms.
The living spaces are set back to create space for an outdoor balcony and a roof overhang that protects the interior from unwanted solar gain.
The concrete modules were prefabricated off-site and fitted with insulation, electrical sockets and switches, technical rails, and all mechanical connectors before they were transported to the site for final assembly.
“The shed roof has a very functionalist intention. As a prefab and modular system, Gomos is supposed to be produced in a place and shipped and installed in many different locations,” says Gonçalves. “So we wanted to ensure that it would work well even if it’s assembled in a place with severe rainfall or snow.”
The long, low home sits unobtrusively atop the ridge. Large areas of glazing open the home to the landscape to the south.
An enclosed porch with a fireplace sits between the living wing and the services wing, providing a pivotal point from which the home fans out.
The simple, affordable material palette allows the home to sit comfortably within the natural landscape.
The home is oriented to take in views of Mount Canobolas in the Great Dividing Range. With an elevation of 4,577 feet, the extinct volcano is the highest mountain in the region.
Floor-to-ceiling glazing ensures natural light is plentiful throughout the home. The silvertop ash cladding on the exterior will develop a silver-gray patina over time.
The home is respectful to the rural site and champions the view. Thanks to the prefab construction, there was very little earthwork and minimal site impact. This approach also helped to eliminate potential weather delays—which would have been likely as, owing to the high altitude, the area frequently experiences frost and snow in winter months.
The 1,950-square-foot Koto LivingHome 2 (Piha) is organized around a central open-plan living space with a direct connection to the outdoors. The design is named after the two courtyards located on both sides of the home.
Wrapped in timber, the 1,016-square-foot Koto LivingHome 1 (Yksi) includes two bedrooms and a flex room on the first floor. The open-plan kitchen, dining, and living area is located on the floor above.
Koto and Plant Prefab will work directly with homeowners to determine optimal site placement and adhere to energy-saving passive solar principles.
Rainwater runoff is collected in a bucket.
A metal chimney allows heat escape from the sauna's wood stove.
For Melbourne Design Week 2020, Sydney-based art and architecture collective Studio Rain created Atmosphere: A Revival, a sauna installation along the picturesque Yarra River meant to revive bathing culture.
Based in Asheville, Deltec Homes is one of the best-known prefabricated and kit home designers—and they’re particularly renowned for producing energy-efficient, hurricane-resistant homes. Deltec’s Ridgeline model (above) is designed to maximize energy efficiency, and it consumes two-thirds less energy than a typical home.
With a 60,000-square-foot facility, Spanish Fork–based Irontown Homes designs and constructs quality modular homes. The custom designs can arrive nearly 95% complete, and they’re typically finished within a few weeks of reaching their site.
Gabions and loose stone create walkable pervious surfaces.
Designed for year-round use, the Rocky Brook weeHouse features covered and exposed spaces for enjoying the outdoors.
To minimize energy use, the residence relies on natural ventilation for cooling. Heat is provided by an inflow hydronic tubing system. Note the guesthouse seen behind the bridge.
The clients encouraged the development of hemlock trees, which grow from the creek to the building site. They create a beautiful backdrop for the second story of the main building and deck overtop the master bedroom.
The home is clad in corrugated Cor-ten steel siding selected for its durability and ability to blend the home into its natural surroundings over time.
Located two hours north of Boston, the Rocky Brook weeHouse is carved out of the grade of a steep creekside lot.
Amagansett Modular House by MB Architecture
Six slabs were placed in a row on top of prefab concrete walls (inset). The architects chose the components in part for their length, which could span the width of the house, eliminating the need for columns.
Successful cabin designs allowed for the easy expansion into larger saunas as well. Taking the same shape as a small-to-mid-sized hut, the company offers two six-person saunas.
The company's Iglusauna is available in three main sizes—from an egg-like, four-person model, to a six-person model that resembles the cabins.
The uneven edges of the elevated pine deck trace around the exposed rocks.
“The clients wanted a house that blended into nature,” notes Berensson.
The fir cladding will develop a silvery patina over time that will enable the buildings to blend into the landscape.
A view from the bridge toward the guesthouse on the left and the sauna on the right.
“The deck and living room host spaces for daytime activities,” says Berensson. “After crossing the bridge, you can enjoy the sunset over the Stockholm Archipelago from on top of the sauna house.”
Located on a remote island without roads, the Zartmann House is accessible only by private boat or a seasonal ferry ride followed by a one-third-mile walk.
In New Hampshire White Mountains, the Rocky Brook weeHouse is a loft-like home designed to embrace forest views and the sounds of rushing creek nearby.
The weeHouse has also been applied to a new, housing-for-the-homeless prototypes designed for the Envision Community Group in Minneapolis.
Designed for senior design director at Apple, the ultra-minimal Sonoma weeHouse in California is a custom high-end build comprising two minimalist, open-sided boxes with nine-foot-tall sliding glass walls to open the interiors up to the outdoors.
Helsinki architect Ville Hara and designer Linda Bergroth collaborated on this prefab shed-meets-sleeping-cabin, which can be assembled with little else than a screwdriver. Bergroth, inspired by nomadic yurt dwellers, wanted an indoor/outdoor experience for her property in Finland.
Multi-discipli­nary Swedish firm Claesson Koivisto Rune created the plans for this home for design-minded kit-house manu­fact­urer Arkitektus. Considering the unique balance of the facade, as well as its climate-specific construction—the asymmetrical "lifted" roof allows for both water drainage and maximum light during the dark winter months—Claesson Koivisto Rune’s approach to the project is some­what surprising. "We design buildings from the inside out," explains principal Eero Koivisto. "The exterior is more or less a product of the interior plans."
The roofline of the Tind house prototype, designed by Claesson Koivisto Rune for prefab company Fiskarhedenvillan, has more conventional Swedish gables than the flat-roofed modernism of typical prefab units.
The solar panel–topped roofs vary slightly in height for added visual interest.
The homes with a north-south orientation feature silver facades. Wooden slats are affixed to every other residence for visual variation.
The module ends are clad in cedar planks with a gray Swedish vitriol stain.
Oriented to face the west, the interconnected modules fan out to provide three slightly different views of the adjacent gully between two rises in the landscape.
“The name Warp House comes from the challenges of constructing these ‘warped’ modules in comparison to the standard boxes prefabricators normally construct,” note the architects.
The modules “float” above the landscape to minimize site impact.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.