58 Exterior Prefab Tiny Home Design Photos And Ideas

All lightHouses come with custom OxBox (oxidized steel) and Barn (wood) siding, as well as a collection of unique exterior steel features.
The first Plant Prefab–built modular lightHouse ADU was completed earlier this spring in Sebastopol, California. This 423-square-foot lightHouse was completed for around $285,000. That figure breaks down to approximate costs of $210,000 for design, engineering and production; $60,000 for infrastructure and site work; and $15,000 for shipping and installation.
Pictured is a rendering of a 570-square-foot 2X lightHouse with a one-bedroom unit stacked atop a two-car garage.
At under 100 square feet, the 8' x 12' Site Shack includes just the essentials: a wood-burning stove, a desk, and storage.
The exterior is wrapped in cement fiber boards with a Cembrit patina finish. Due to a lack of onshore infrastructure, a big challenge of the project was the addition of self-contained  sewage and clear water tanks.
Along the opposite side, sheets of self-rusting Corten steel run along the home, hiding stairs to the upper deck behind them. The striking facade contrasts with the otherwise muted exterior.
For maximum privacy, the bridge leads directly to the home's entrance, bypassing a walk-around deck that is typically found on houseboat or floating home designs. Along the front half of the roof, permanent vegetation adds greenery in the summer months.
Burnt cedar, Japanese cypress plywood, and mortar create a trio of contrasting yet simple surface textures that breathe a relaxed vibe into the Muji Hut.
The Ecological Living Module (ELM) was installed at the UN Headquarters in New York City for two months.
The petite prefab cabin only took eight days to assemble once arriving to Switzerland.
A look at the backside of the 236-square-foot house.
Framing picturesque views of a small valley and nearby orchard, Baumhaus Halden is comprised of a steel frame with four wooden support beams.
Baumhaus Halden glows at night.
The mobile office evolved into what is now dubbed the Site Shack. "It’s generally very comfortable," says Patrick Powers of Powers Construction. "It really is an amazing work space, and something we can have fun with."
Hexagonal and pentagonal panels come together to form this cabin’s oblong envelope. The unique architectural skin mimics the rock formations that surround it.
Based in New York City, Cocoon9 takes a unique approach to prefab homes, offering a line of tiny homes with high-quality construction and finishes, smart technology, energy efficiencies, and versatile spaces that are ready for the modern market.
The home's modular design is composed of an outer shell and an interior core unit that contains essential living functions, such as a bed, bathroom, and a small kitchenette.
This Beverly Hills kitHAUS is comprised of modernist prefab modules that can accommodate a variety of uses: from yoga studios to home offices, and from weekend retreats to pop-up kiosks and guest rooms.
Estonian design collective Kodasema launched this 269-square-foot micro-home, which can be built in less than a day.
Italian prefab company LEAPfactory built this alpine shelter off-site and had it flown in via helicopter. Cantilevered off the edge of a mountain, the structure features a living room, a dine-in kitchen, bunk beds, storage closets, and an integrated computer to keep mountaineers and climbers up-to-date on the weather conditions.
Italian architects Roberto Dini and Stefano Girodo designed this tiny bivouac structure in the Italian Alps to help encourage exploration of the remote location. Perched on the side of a mountain at an altitude of 10,794 feet, the structure was commissioned by the family of Luca Pasqualetti, a mountaineer who tragically passed away in the Alps. The installation was an exercise in well-planned logistics: The architects collaborated with the Italian prefab company LEAPfactory to assemble the unit in an off-site workshop, and the prefab pieces were lifted into place via helicopter and installed in a single day.
With a factory in Estonia, Koda produces a prefabricated house that arrives on-site as a single unit via a trailer. Their units, which typically feature a lofted space in the back of the module, can be combined for larger homes, or simply used as offices and smaller residences. Once the module has been transported to the site, installation can be as quick as a single day, as long as the required site work has been completed.
The smallest DublDom model, the DD 26, is a compact, 280-square-foot studio with a cozy bathroom with heated floors.
Wedge by Wheelhaus
The Hammerfest Cabin is perched high atop a rocky slope.
The small cabin's cross-laminated timber (CLT) shell, composed of 72 unique wooden panels, is designed to withstand severe arctic storms and heavy wind conditions.
While perched at the peak of the mountain, adventurous travelers are rewarded with unparalleled views of the region's breathtaking natural scenery.
“We are delighted to see that our ambition to create this innovative sanctuary for adventurers has been realized,” says James Dodson of SPINN Architects. “We hope that the cabin will continue to be enjoyed and will encourage more people to visit the stunning location in the future.”
The Hammerfest Cabin is the first of several concept cabins in an innovative series. The second cabin, planned for late 2019, will be built on Tyven—a mountain on the other side of Hammerfest.
The overall construction cost of the Hammerfest Cabin was about €100,000, including many hours of volunteer work.
The cabin's faceted, geometric shell is specifically designed to withstand harsh weather conditions. The structure underwent rigorous wind and snow simulations before any construction on the mountain began.
The unique geometric design was the result of both aesthetic and functional considerations. The bold, eye-catching cabin has already become an attraction in of itself among travelers in the region.
Organic pentagonal and hexagonal panels, varying in size, come together to form the cabin's exterior envelope.
Over time, Kebony develops a silver-grey natural patina with exposure to sun and moisture. The metallic sheen is similar in appearance to the natural rock formations which surround the cabin.
The exterior cladding is made of Kebony, a sustainable treated wood product. The company uses heat and natural chemicals to give softwoods, such as pine, enhanced strength and durability. The timber product is sustainably sourced and nearly maintenance-free—a huge benefit in an environment where weathering and wear can be drastic.
Fitting in seamlessly with the fabric of the natural landscape, the cabin makes a modest impact in scale, while providing a functional benefit to travelers in the region.
Prefabricated and stackable, Kasita's high-density units may be a solution to America’s affordable housing crisis—with tech-enabled, high-quality design to boot.
The new, semi-custom PreMade mobile units can be used in a variety of applications.
The Site Shack in a pristine natural setting in British Columbia.
Pick-up points on the exterior allow the Site Shack to be transported by crane with ease.
The Site Shack is seamless in appearance without visible fasteners.
A tough, rusted steel exterior holds up against the elements of a construction site.
Powers Construction uses the Site Shack as a space to meet with homeowners and discuss the project.
Powers Construction originally developed the compact and contemporary Site Shack as a mobile workspace for their residential job sites.
The entrance to the Orchid Tiny House.
They tiny house connects to the outdoors with clerestory windows, floor-to-ceiling windows, skylights, and a garage door that opens up an entire wall.
To protect against water penetration, the walls and roof are assembled with three-quarter inch pressure-treated OSB sheathing, Typar housewrap, an ice and water shield, asphalt paper, furring strips, and stained penofin cedar.
With a stark and restrained design, the sense of presence and solitude are carefully elevated.
Seeing the hut set against a vast seascape shows how the design allows the structure to be enveloped by the surrounding landscape.
Project Name: Island House

Website: http://www.2by4.nl/language/en/
Project Name: Basic Pod

Website: http://www.pod-idladla.com/
Because the unit was temporary, it didn't follow the typical permitting process of a micro-unit or home in New York City; what's more, because it was installed on land owned by the United Nations, local and federal codes and permits did not apply.
Manufactured in a factory offsite, the 370-square-foot house can comfortably fit two people.
Even though the house can be connected to the city grid, it also has solar panels that collect energy from the sun and can produce its own energy.
The back view of the

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.