113 Exterior Prefab Building Type House Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

In a small community with a common garden, FabCab built this prefab home incorporates high-quality materials like Douglas fir to keep the home from feeling clinical, despite its construction in a factory. The architects incorporated universal design features like flooring that wheelchairs can roll over easily and grab bars, making the homes appropriate for aging clients.
Consisting of three prefabricated units in West Seattle on a 5,000 square-foot lot, the units range from 1,250-1,400 square feet, each with three bedrooms and two and a half bathrooms. The generous glazing of the living rooms are set back from the exterior cedar rainscreen, and the rest of the facade is sheathed in metal panels. The ground floor was built onsite, but the upper two floors were prefabricated offsite in a factory.
Inspired by the traditional shingle-clad homes in the neighborhood, this prefab home in Seattle was based off a base design by Method Homes and then customized by Grouparchitect to accommodate the client’s needs and a unique site. Doors were widened, a rear porch was enclosed for an additional bedroom, and specialized storage including an enlarged laundry room, a generous pantry, and built-in cubbies for each member of the family were added.
As Washington State’s first LEED Platinum Modular Home, Lane Street was completed by Greenfab with a focus on energy reduction through a combination of eco-friendly exterior materials and energy-conscious heating and cooling equipment, including a hybrid heat pump water heater and energy recovery ventilation. The home, at 1,870 square feet, consists of three bedrooms and was completed for an all-in cost of $405,000 in 2010.
Seattle-based Stillwater Dwellings designed this one-story prefab home just north of Seattle in Edmunds, Washington for a client who wanted to “age in place.” With this in mind, Stillwater provided wide hallways and an open concept living space, with the company’s signature glass wall for year-round daylight and views of the outdoors. A deep overhanging roof shades the interior, along with other features like clerestory windows, natural materials, and high ceilings reflecting Stillwater’s commitment to sustainable design and the environment.
The starting price for a fully built 685-square-foot, two-bedroom Cubicco model in the Miami area is just over $115,000.
Functioning as a vacation rental for tourists, entrepreneur Rick Clegg combined old shipping containers to create a four-bedroom home with an eco twist near Palm Beach, Florida. Because of the container's inherent durability, they meet Florida's stringent construction standards, and the compactness of the home, the low carbon footprint because of the use of the recycled, prefabricated containers, and the home's proximity to the Loxahatchee River, make it ideal for ecotourists.
The Tulip model by Steelhomes is a manufactured 1-bedroom, 2-bathroom residence with just over 1000 square feet of living space. Based in Miami, Steelhomes maintains a steel frame factory in Opa Locka and works throughout South Florida.
The steel-framed platforms are largely open to the elements.
The the warm wood siding is juxtaposed against the industrial grey steel frame of the structure.
All the modules were designed to be able to fit on the platform of a freight truck.
The terrace serves as the dining area for the home.
The terrace attaches to the main structure via a covered walkway.
A study room that opens to the green backyard.
An updated modular prefab in Norway's in the Snarøya peninsula.
Salem, Oregon-based Ideabox approaches prefabricated homes from a modern and sustainable point of view, seeking to build prefab residences that are beautiful, efficient, and affordable. With 9 basic types that can be customized, the homes start at 400-500 square feet and reach about 1,600 square feet. Each home is built with open-web engineered trusses, insulation with high R-values, dual pane low-e windows, and EnergyStar-certified appliances.
Purcell Timber Frame Homes is, as they say, a product of their environment: the beautiful Kootenay mountains of Nelson, British Columbia. They've developed a strong relationship with the local forests, and build prefabricated, packaged, and fully-customized homes in British Columbia and Alberta, Canada as well as several states in the Pacific Northwest, including Oregon. Their homes feature natural timber frames, and their catalogue collection includes bungalows, beach houses, ski chalets, cabins, and cottages that are designed to perform with the elements and be low-maintenance.
Method Homes is a custom manufacturer of precision–engineered, prefabricated, modern structures that services the Western United States and Canada, including Oregon. Their homes range in size and style, from 1,200-square-foot rustic cabins to 3,5000-square-foot contemporary residences. Method Homes also has an ongoing commitment to sustainable design, with many of their homes eligible for LEED certification and other environmental certifications; some homes can even be designed to be energy net-zero.
Originally, glass doors opened to the deck, but after years of gusty winds, it was decided that a side entrance, protected by a sliding steel door, would be the preferred entrance.
Together with a personal Hanse Haus specialist, pre-configured house designs can be adapted simply and easily in order to suit all tastes and specifications.
The Sanders family has been serving up modular homes on the Gulf Coast since 1985.
While sustainability, ease of construction, and affordability are priorities for most kit home companies, not all are as concerned with aesthetics. Stillwater Dwellings, which has participated in both the 2013 and 2014 Dwell on Design exhibitions, puts a distinct emphasis on natural lighting, intelligent floor plans, and high-quality craftsmanship to ensure innovative, modern designs.
Project Name: Santa Monica Prefab
Project Name: Dawnsknoll
Project Name: Vertical House

Website: https://www.muji.com/jp/
Project Name: Orinda Connect 8 & Connect 2

Website: http://connect-homes.com/dev/
Project Name: The Hen House

Website: http://www.ruraldesign.co.uk/
Project Name: Desert Canopy House

Website: http://www.sander-architects.com/
Project Name: The Breeze House

Website: https://www.bluhomes.com/
Project Name: ModHaus

Website: http://eastcoastmodern.ca/
Project Name: JustK – Living Space in Tübingen

Website: http://www.amunt.info/
Project Name: Martis Camp, CA

Website: http://www.cleverhomes.net
Project Name: Boring, OR

Website: http://stillwaterdwellings.com/
Project Name: AH #62

Website: http://www.arkitekthus.se/
Project Name: Kenyon Residence

Website: http://www.protohomes.com/
Project Name: Blair Barn House

Website: http://www.weehouse.com/
Project Name: Orchard

Website: http://www.ideabox.us/
Project Name: Paradigm Series

Website: http://methodhomes.net/
Project Name: P.A.T.H. Prefabricated Accessible Technological Homes

Website: http://www.starckwithriko.com/
Project Name: Sweet Repose

Website: http://turkeldesign.com/
The Rudin House in Madison, built following Lloyd Wright's prefabricated Plan #2 for Marshall Erdman's company, is one of two homes built as a large, flat-roofed square with a double-height living room accented with a wall of windows. [Photo via Mike Condren]
New York City boasts only two Frank Lloyd Wright structures: the Guggenheim Museum, and this modest prefab on Staten Island. The Cass House was built according to the Prefab #1 plan he designed for Erdman's prefab company. According to the New York Times, "It was built late in his life from a plan for prefab moderate-cost housing. The components were made in a Midwest factory and shipped to Staten Island for construction under the supervision of a Wright associate, Morton H. Delson... Wright had planned to tour the Staten Island house, but shortly before his scheduled arrival he became ill and died at age 92 on April 9, 1959." [Photo via Bridge and Tunnel Club]
The only grouping of Frank Lloyd Wright's early American System-Built Homes—built by Arthur Richards and designed with standardized components for mass appeal to moderate-income families—is situated in the Burnham Park neighborhood in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The four model 7A duplexes, one model B1 bungalow (shown here), and model C3 bungalow were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. [Photo via McNees.org]

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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