24 Exterior Prefab Building Type Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The Tulip model by Steelhomes is a manufactured 1-bedroom, 2-bathroom residence with just over 1000 square feet of living space. Based in Miami, Steelhomes maintains a steel frame factory in Opa Locka and works throughout South Florida.
A study room that opens to the green backyard.
An updated modular prefab in Norway's in the Snarøya peninsula.
At 939 square feet on the main floor, the
Mono in the woods of Montana
Architect Stefano Girodo explains the building has a “completely prefabricated and modular structure.” It was built using recyclable and environmentally friendly materials and designed to ensure easy mechanical assembly once on site.
The school building sits above the snow, on light piles instead of a permanent concrete foundation. This makes the building easily removable and, according to Girodo, “avoids risks and complications during on-site construction.” The environmental impact of the facility’s 10-day dry-assembly was minimal compared to traditional construction methods.
Originally, glass doors opened to the deck, but after years of gusty winds, it was decided that a side entrance, protected by a sliding steel door, would be the preferred entrance.
Pentayurts at Easy Buckaroo Camp
This particular project, at 300 square feet, required some modification to meet building codes. Nevertheless, it took only a week and a half to build on site.
The Sanders family has been serving up modular homes on the Gulf Coast since 1985.
Project Name: Island House

Website: http://www.2by4.nl/language/en/
Project Name: ModHaus

Website: http://eastcoastmodern.ca/
Clad in a mix of stained cedar, Metal Sales corrugated siding, and James Hardie cement board, houses in The Village are arranged along winding paths intended to provide opportunities for neighbors to interact.
Girodo describes LEAPfactory’s architecture as being “molded according to the needs and stresses imposed by context.” In this setting, strong winds and snow loads are serious concerns. The shell’s composite sandwich panels and aluminum shingles ensure that the school can withstand the elements.
The Element House stands on pylons, creating the illusion it hovers over the desert floor. Nine thermal chimneys, one of which can be seen right, channel hot air out from the interior living areas.
Each prefabricated unit is covered in aluminum but built from SIPS: Structurally Insulated Panels that consist of thick insulation sandwiched between plywood panels. These high-performance panels keep the interior protected from the desert's ambient heat.
This dwelling joins a number of structures—such as a boathouse and guesthouse—owned by one family and used for vacations. They needed a new house to accommodate new generations at the reatreat.
According to Remijnse, since the only direction they could build on the small site was up, they decided to add height with a gabled roof.
Renowned designer and architect Jens Risom sourced parts from a catalog for his customized A-frame and had them delivered in pieces to his remote island site off Rhode Island, helped to raise the aesthetic profile of modular construction.
A bright-yellow “R” sign, from a truck that used to deliver furniture from Jens Risom Design, sets off the southern facade. When Jens designed the house, he stipulated that he wanted cedar shingles, not the asphalt ones that came with the original design from the catalog.
On the north-facing facade, it’s easy to discern where the original glass doors used to open directly to the deck. In spring of 2012, Block Island contractor John Spier replaced the entire wall of glass panels.
Mid-century designer Jens Risom's A-framed prefab family retreat, located on the northern portion of Block island, is bordered by a low stone wall, an aesthetic element that appears throughout the land.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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