Dwell's Favorite 23 Hallway Design Photos And Ideas

Both the walls of the hallway leading to the master bedroom and the two bathrooms are covered in a Fornasetti wallpaper that features dreamy cloud graphics.
The entry features a custom-made floating bench. Hooks were added for convenience, as the mudroom would be the main point of entry after a day spent on the slopes.
The pentagonal geometry of the  third story is echoed by an Alumilex  window.
Rough oak cabinetry frames the corridor that leads between the open living spaces, and the private beds and baths.
Inside the home green and blue are used for the bathroom block, dark brown for the sliding door, and orange for the wall dividing the living room from the kitchen. The floor is dark gray industrial poured concrete.
Architect Don Dimster designed this duplex as two family homes – one for him and his family and one for his brother’s family – with a pair of glass-walled, suspended steel stairways that connect both family homes to a shared 1,000-square-foot rooftop patio.
Architect Christi Azevedo, along with homeowners Lorena Siminovich and Esteban Kerner, transformed this 1,485-square-foot, multilevel, mid-century maze into a modern and efficient family home in just three months. “It was the craziest frickin’ thing,” laughs Azevedo. “It was like a Tetris game, putting it all together, trying to squeak out space wherever we could.” Purchased as if straight out of 1955, the home is now the ideal small space for Siminovich and Kerner to raise their young daughter, Matilda.
The skylights are constantly changing the home's interiors. It's "not just day/night, or dark/light," says Bernheimer, "but the quality of light...changes at any given hour, depending on where clouds are, where the sun is, whether the moon is full or not, all dependent on the time of day, time of year, and so forth."
Reading nook and skylight.
In the bedroom wing, sunlight shines down from the Plexiglass bubbles. Steel in the cutaways reflects the light.
Verona chairs from Structube surround a vintage dining table.
-
North Hatley, Quebec
Dwell Magazine : July / August 2017
In this Brazilian home, São Paulo studio Jacobsen Arquitetura placed laminated timber porticoes approximately 1.31 feet apart, to create a dynamic linear aesthetics that brings to mind the tori gates of Kyoto’s famous Fushimi Inari shrine.
The main corridor bends 100 degrees from end to end and leads to three guest rooms, each with a different color door. “Roland took a Lawren Harris painting and matched the colors perfectly,” says David.
Once inside, natural light serves as an important material layered amongst its solid counterparts. Wood ceilings sit slightly pulled back from the walls to create a feeling of expansiveness.
Photography by Matthew Millman
Hallway on the second level of the house.
A sinuous ramp links public space to the private space.

More than a way to get from point A to point B, modern hallways are important transitional spaces that connect both rooms and people. A well-designed hallway maximizes our experience of moving between activities and stages of the day. The photos below showcase some outstanding examples with various flooring options from hardwood to concrete.