Dwell's Favorite 66 Hallway Design Photos And Ideas

The playful aesthetics of Austin Maynard Architects have once again breathed new life into aging building stock—this time with the transformation of a dark and narrow terrace in Melbourne into an open and light-filled home fitted out with sustainable features. Upstairs, the "parents’ retreat" includes a centrally located bathroom "box," seen on the left of the image. The bright orange walkway is perforated to let natural light pass through.
When designer Hilton Carter furnished the industrial-style Baltimore apartment and work studio he shares with his wife Fiona, their dog Charlie and two cats Zoe and Isabella, he created a wondrous indoor woodland that offers all the benefits of being outdoors without leaving home.
Douglas fir lines the walls of the entryway. A narrow striped rug adds texture to the white-painted wooden floor from Dinesen.
CVC House by Estudio MMX
To create a low-energy house, several passive environmental strategies have been incorporated into the home, including a heated floor system and exterior automated wood blinds. "Natural air ventilation in every room and cross-ventilation between opposite facades keeps the need for air conditioning to a minimum,
The original arches were turned into doors with steel-framed glass that let in ample natural light. Custom terrazzo lines the floors.
A glass-and-steel staircase leads upstairs to the private sleeping quarters, which are connected via a bridge. "Setting the bedrooms in a separate area lets everyone feel like they have a place to call their own," the clients say.
Natural stone abounds in the design.
The space is now defined by a contrasting coat of Benjamin Moore Witching Hour. The cozy niche contains a vintage Overman loveseat and Pholc wall sconce.
In the reception area, Geremia Design called upon Chambers Art & Design to co-design and engineer a stretched fabric screen depicting Yosemite's Half Dome. The pendant lighting is by Workstead.
By inserting a tunnel made from 36 reclaimed commercial doors and tearing down a handful of walls, LOT-EK and contractor Andreas Scholtz brought light into the formerly unused dark hallway in Maurice Russell (right) and Jorge Fontanez’s apartment. The glossy Safety Red paint by Benjamin Moore catches the light by day but “becomes a richer, darker, very relaxing red at night,” Fontanez says.
Spanning 10,000 square feet, the subterranean museum is comprised of 10 galleries (seven indoor and three outdoor), a cafe, and a reading room.
A view from the front door shows that the bright and airy open floor plan leads straight through to the backyard.
The kitchen is enclosed by windows, which gives the home a strong indoor/outdoor connection.
A view of the entry from inside. A mid-century palette and simple modern graphic of warm walnut, textured glass, painted door, and stained wood door jambs.
Clean white walls and natural wood flooring redirect guests back toward the outside views.
After passing through the wooden opening, guests enter the home via a glass-encased hallway.
Light wells carry natural light to the rooms below ground.
Timber beams lend the house a rustic-modern feel.
A sun-soaked reading corridor connects the living pavilion to the sleeping pavilion (seen in front).
Constructed using ETF-developed technology, the Lightweight Translucent Facade is a thin, double-curved system with highly effective insulation made of aerogel granules inserted and stabilized between specially developed membrane panels.
The design team reduced the size of the garage to allow for a larger kitchen.
The hallway tiles are by Domus.
The open sliding doors of the kitchen and children’s room can flexibly stretch the space, and when fully opened, improve circulation.
The mezzanine loft looks down to the living and dining rooms.
Details of the passageway: wallpaper by Maharam, a reading area with a vintage bookcase, and a 1950s armchair from Carrozzeria 900.
Eduardo Luque, and his dog, Bruno, both have grown up in Casa Gilardi, Luis Barragán's last completed project.
Casa Gilardi by Luis Barragán
A cool corridor with built-in storage.
Steve Conine, a software engineer, installed and programmed many of the details himself, like the Dell UltraSharp flat-screen panels inlaid into the entryway of the home.
On a sloped plot in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles, an almost 100-year-old anonymous bungalow was rendered in pink, referencing the sun-kissed stucco that's so common in the region. 
Mexico City-based architecture firm PRODUCTORA completely remodeled and renovated the home of graphic designer Jessica Fleischmann, daughter of Ernst Fleischmann, who led the Los Angeles Philharmonic and commissioned Frank Gehry to build the Walt Disney Concert Hall. Over the 15 years she lived in the home, she developed a strong connection to the neighborhood and the house itself, which inspired her to renovate it. With her strong affinity for design, she was thoroughly involved in the creative process, including selecting the particular colors that are interspersed throughout the renovation and extension of the house.
Stone steps lead up from the gated front door to the entrance on the south side of the house.
An all-black dressing room.
The breezy foyer exemplifies the design team’s commitment to creating an airy, elegant space.
After: A peek inside the beautifully restored, modernized abode.
A vertical slit has been made in the main cube to create an inner patio. The slit brings in air and light, breaking up the mass of the cube and softening the sharp geometry of the design.
Atop the kitchen and bathroom lies an additional sleeping quarter, directly under the sky above.
Both the walls of the hallway leading to the master bedroom and the two bathrooms are covered in a Fornasetti wallpaper that features dreamy cloud graphics.
The entry features a custom-made floating bench. Hooks were added for convenience, as the mudroom would be the main point of entry after a day spent on the slopes.
The pentagonal geometry of the  third story is echoed by an Alumilex  window.
Rough oak cabinetry frames the corridor that leads between the open living spaces, and the private beds and baths.
Inside the home green and blue are used for the bathroom block, dark brown for the sliding door, and orange for the wall dividing the living room from the kitchen. The floor is dark gray industrial poured concrete.
Architect Don Dimster designed this duplex as two family homes – one for him and his family and one for his brother’s family – with a pair of glass-walled, suspended steel stairways that connect both family homes to a shared 1,000-square-foot rooftop patio.
Architect Christi Azevedo, along with homeowners Lorena Siminovich and Esteban Kerner, transformed this 1,485-square-foot, multilevel, mid-century maze into a modern and efficient family home in just three months. “It was the craziest frickin’ thing,” laughs Azevedo. “It was like a Tetris game, putting it all together, trying to squeak out space wherever we could.” Purchased as if straight out of 1955, the home is now the ideal small space for Siminovich and Kerner to raise their young daughter, Matilda.
The placement of the windows creates sight lines across the 4,770-square-foot structure. Northern Wide Plank sourced the reclaimed hemlock for the facade; Sherma Construction picked the specific boards to create a cohesive look.
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North Hatley, Quebec
Dwell Magazine : July / August 2017
The skylights are constantly changing the home's interiors. It's "not just day/night, or dark/light," says Bernheimer, "but the quality of light...changes at any given hour, depending on where clouds are, where the sun is, whether the moon is full or not, all dependent on the time of day, time of year, and so forth."
Reading nook and skylight.
In the bedroom wing, sunlight shines down from the Plexiglass bubbles. Steel in the cutaways reflects the light.
Verona chairs from Structube surround a vintage dining table.
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North Hatley, Quebec
Dwell Magazine : July / August 2017
In this Brazilian home, São Paulo studio Jacobsen Arquitetura placed laminated timber porticoes approximately 1.31 feet apart, to create a dynamic linear aesthetics that brings to mind the tori gates of Kyoto’s famous Fushimi Inari shrine.
The main corridor bends 100 degrees from end to end and leads to three guest rooms, each with a different color door. “Roland took a Lawren Harris painting and matched the colors perfectly,” says David.

More than a way to get from point A to point B, modern hallways are important transitional spaces that connect both rooms and people. A well-designed hallway maximizes our experience of moving between activities and stages of the day. The photos below showcase some outstanding examples with various flooring options from hardwood to concrete.