Dwell's Favorite 52 Doors Design Photos And Ideas

In Yuen Long, Hong Kong, a 452-square foot residence is designed to accommodate a young couple, one of their mothers, and their pets: a cat and a parrot. The home features transforming furniture and nooks and crannies that are perfect for the pets. A bench by the door doubles as a litter box.
Homeowner Simon Doonan stands next to the front door. "We have flamboyance, and we’re not inhibited about anything. [Architect] Gray Organschi gave [the house] that intellectual rigor needed to make it beautiful. We were well matched."
Architect Javier Senosiain created this remarkable home on a hilly site near Mexico City. “The green dune wraps itself around the inside spaces almost completely, rendering it almost invisible. From the outside, all one sees are grass, bushes, trees, and flowers,” he says.
"It was rundown, dark, and divided," recalls Masaaki of his first impression of the warehouse, the ground floor of a multistory apartment building. But after some thought, Masaaki, a Japanese-born architect, and Esther, an artist from Minorca, realized that owning the combined 2,700 square feet would allow them to headquarter Mas-aqui, the architecture and design firm they were planning to start, on-site. They bought the property and within months transformed it into a bright, modern live/work space.
On a trip to Naoshima, Japan, the Houston newlyweds behind Robertson Design fell in love with Tadao Ando’s concrete-composed museums. This led the couple to create a residence of their own comprised of a low concrete wall, concrete cube, and box clad in Siberian larch. The indoors are rounded out with white oak, marble, and leather-finished granite.
Pictured here is the door to the bathroom. White curtains inside the bathroom provide privacy.
Fifty miles north of New York City, a controversial home and guesthouse were built from Frank Lloyd Wright’s drawings on a private island. Intriguingly, the main home was completed in 1996 following Wright's original sketches for the 1950s owner of the island, who ultimately instead commissioned a 1,200-square-foot home on the island because of the high cost. Today, that 1,200-square-foot home serves as a three-bedroom guesthouse—the perfect space for extended family to stay.
Opening to the home's main entrance on the upper level, a large red sliding door—one of three—is painted Gypsy Red by Sherwin-Williams. To the left is the kitchen and dining space, and to the right is the living room and studio.
A honed basalt walkway leads to the re-imagined front door.
The entrance is an artistic mix of midcentury lines and features globe pendant lighting.
A calming vibe is immediately instilled at the entry.
This door with space-age knobs is painted with Behr's Flaming Torch. The brass wall hanging above the landing is by C. Jeré.
Lift-and-slide doors open the ground-floor living space up to the outdoor courtyard. The exposed concrete floor of the interior is echoed in the courtyard by linear concrete pavers to emphasize indoor/outdoor living.
The two bedrooms are located down the hallway from the common areas. Each room has its own fully equipped bathroom.
A glass-encased entrance hallway extends outward to meet guests before leading to the central tower and staircase.
The gate, opening onto the entry courtyard, serves as the pavilion's front door.
The subdued palette blends warm timber tones with white interiors and stone accents.
The custom sliding laundry room door by Dotzler Designs was made from glass and steel to allow natural light into the laundry room, and doubles as a ladder to access storage space above.
Glazed sliding doors blur the lines between indoor and outdoor living and help bring in cooling cross breezes from the coast.
An oversized entrance door leads to an angled hallway that obscures views to create an element of surprise. The Vollen bench in Custom Red Lacquer is from Chadhaus.
Sliding fritted glass doors provide privacy and sectioned-off spaces when needed.
The entrance to the triplex.
Klopf Architecture preserved the vertical “thinline” wood siding, and matched it in kind at the front addition.
Throughout Thornbury House, Olaver Architecture was deliberate about applying "minor alterations to simple forms," to make the so-called "box" addition feel more special. Starting at the entry, a timber-clad, curved corner creates flow.
The entrance to the house.
A bright yellow front door adds a bold pop of color to the minimal exterior palette.
Mirrored glass allows this holiday home in Mexico to blend in with it's woodland site.
A palette of stone, concrete, and greenery greets guests at the home’s front entrance.
An attentive sensitivity to site played into nearly every aspect of both the exterior andinterior spaces of the home. Architect Peter Rose collaborated with landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh, who worked to craft and maintain the wild, organic feel of the environs. Will Parry, a local builder, custom-fabricated all of the sustainably harvested Spanish cedar-and-glass windows and skylights throughout. Here, a vertical-swinging window at the end of the entry hallway opens directly to a lush expanse of vegetation.
Olson Kundig's natural and warm architectural palette combines metal, wood, and concrete, set against the blues and greens of the lush surroundings and bay.
The ten-by-six-foot solid wood door has a traditional "waving wood" pattern to the surface.
"We hope that in time the house will make the client's lifestyle better by providing spaces that can change as they progress in life, much like how an outdoor space constantly changes with the environment," say the architects.
Conceived as a glass wall or window that could swing open rather than a typical door, the resulting glass-and-metal piece is so heavy that it required its own foundation! Thanks to clever engineering by Sand Studios, even seven-year-old Macy can operate the 2,000-pound door.
Play area
Ample glazing blurs the distinction between indoors and out.
Sliding doors cast shadows across the concrete floor.
Access
Villa H | sliding doors blend in- and outdoor space
Open enclosures and connections to adjacent living spaces keep the home inviting and airy rather than densely packed—a key feature for an owner of two dogs: Ben, a whippet, and Flynn, an Irish gypsy dog.
The front door dissolves into the facade.
Entry hall with Ingo Mauer chandelier
An oversized mahogany door provides a grand entrance to the complex.

Modern doors are all about first impressions, whether it's installed on the exterior or interior. Endlessly customizable, crafted out of metal or wood, they have the power to reconfigure any space. Ideas for modern folding, sliding, and swing doors abound in our collection.