Dwell's Favorite Home Design Ideas and Photos

Playful wallpaper from Graham & Brown livens up the house’s otherwise staid 

powder room, which also contains a 

pint-size Ikea sink.
A minimal material palette of oiled yellow birch and oxidized steel gives the interiors a Japanese-inspired, Zen-like feel.
The glass-enclosed master bedroom floats above the corrugated, oxidized steel exterior.
Wilkin and Pini hired Longma Joinery to build custom cedar windows and doors for their 270-square-foot addition.
A single crepe myrtle, which sports red blossoms in summer, defines the courtyard.
Muennig’s Green House utilizes the western sun of the dramatic Big Sur coastline.
The White House, 2006.
The Red House, 2002.
The architects stuck to a gray-scale color palette, installing slate tile floors that softly contrast with the white walls and Eames dining chairs. “It lets the views out the windows become the focus,” Dworkind explains. Doses of pure black accent important features, like the central wall that divides the kitchen and master bedroom behind it from the main living space.
For a cost-conscious 2,000-square-foot renovation located 30 minutes outside of Austin, Texas, architect Nick Deaver took a look around for inspiration. He spied galvanized metal cladding on the region’s sheds and co-opted the inexpensive, resilient material for his own design.
Viggsö by Arrhov Frick. © Mikael Olsson.

upinteriors.com/go/spr12
Kitchen and furnishings are made of grey wood fiberboard. Over the entire kitchen counter there is an oblong window section that emits light through a roof-mounted kitchen shelf in steel and glass. In the background a glimpse of the cubbyhole/reading corner.
Front facade with Horizontal slat
Upon his first visit to Tasmania, an island south of the Australian mainland, resident David Burns was immediately smitten with its varied, pristine landscape. Working with architecture firm Misho+Associates, he built a self-sustaining, 818-square-foot retreat that would allow him to completely unplug from urban life.
The workstation and the cabinets are by Korben Mathis Woodworking; the desk lamp is  from TaoTronics.
Erecting a modern cabin where a tool shed once stood became a family exercise for architect Jim Cutler and his daughter, Hannah, who worked with him on the design and build.
Located in Orinda, California, a three-bedroom house by architect Greg Faulkner took its first aesthetic cue from a large oak tree on the site. Cor-Ten steel panels clad the exterior, while white oak offers a material counterpoint on the interior. A 12-foot-wide sliding pocket wall opens the living/dining area to a terrace with a Wave Chaise longue by Paola Lenti. The landscape design is by Thuilot Associates.
The Weiners sit in one of the many large window bays, showing how the reused truck bodies look from within.
The main living area is connected to the back unit by a modern bridge. Polished concrete is used for both floors and ceilings, and a Mies van der Rohe Barcelona Stool accents the space.
A guest room and office wing were added to the front of the house. This left the living room roof in tact – a key feature of the original design, and created a front courtyard that define the entry sequence as a unique experience.
The pool at the bottom of the property did not exist when Mcllwee bought the house, even though Lautner had originally planned for it to be there. Mcllwee and Marmol Radziner used Lautner’s original drawings to actually build it. Better late than never.
A MODERN GLASS ADDITION IN BELGIUM

For this tiny house in the Belgian forest, a little extra square footage comes in the form of a glassed-in addition with a stellar view.
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“Floating Farmhouse” in Eldred New York is a modern five-room holiday rental home with a touch of old world charm.
Large clerestory windows face the street at the Higashibatas’ house in Tokyo, optimizing both privacy and natural light within.
Outdoor walkway to the master bedroom
Two beds in the dormitory on the upper level.
The darker gray garage door offers a chromatic and textural contrast to the concrete shell.
Bornstein and his daughter Velma sit at a table the architect designed himself; the dining chairs were designed by Arne Jacobsen for Fritz Hansen.
Large picture windows bring much sunlight into the dining area.
Designed by Marco Casagrande, this floating sauna was a gift for the Rosendal
community, a village at the end of the majestic Hardangerfjord in Norway.
Play area
Ample glazing blurs the distinction between indoors and out.
Chris designed a custom built-in desk in the den for Ellen, who often works from home.
Study Desk
“At first we thought we might not need that much space, but then we started thinking long term. We look at this house as the home of our lifetime.” —Guido Chiavelli
Each Getaway cabin has a hot shower with bath products, and electric toilet, mini-kitchen, hearing, and either one or two queen beds with, fresh linens, and pillows.
Sliding glass doors allow the kitchen and living room to be fully opened to the deck, creating a seamless integration between the interior and exterior space.
During the winter, the family can slide the screens open to let in the winter sun, in summer they can close the screens to provide shade, while still maintaining views and breezes through the timber battens.
Tinted glass windows protect this white kitchen's luminous sheen.
The petite interiors have a built-in sofa facing stunning views from the floor-to-ceiling windows.
Throughout the design, the site was quickly revealed as a powerful element of the project. By choosing carefully the location and size of each window, external views were highlighted, and the atmosphere created by natural light is pleasant throughout the whole day. As for the position of the large sliding door, it was “ pushed “ toward the main interior open space with the intention of subtly separating the internal functions while creating a outside protected space. All these intentions ultimately aim to capture the essence of this project: the surrounding nature and wildlife.
The living room is defined by a large birch plywood television console, designed by architect, Miguel Marcelino.
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Lisbon, Portugal
Dwell Magazine : July / August 2017
Thanks to a spacious bookshelf and plenty of seating, this vibrant area is an inviting spot to read and relax.

Dwell's favorite photos of modern homes and design ideas. From midcentury gems, prefabricated units, and eye-opening renovations, to shipping container construction and custom trailers and campers, these projects display the best from Dwell Magazine and submitted by the Dwell community. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.