Dwell’s Favorite Home Design Ideas and Photos

Prices for standard Igluhuts begin at <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">€19,900 (approximately $23,500), with additional costs for some custom upgrades, taxes, and transportation.</span>
To open up the backyard, the architects removed the existing timber enclosure that once covered the pool.
The Japanese "no-brand" masters of minimalism unveil the first single-story design in their line of prefab homes.
A run-down 1960s cabin in the Swiss Jura Mountains, a gateway to skiing, has been given a smart, playful overhaul by the architecture studio Frundgallina. Carved into four distinct sections, it’s a spiral playground that mingles different heights and thresholds.
Silvano Zamò, third-generation winemaker at Le Vigne di Zamò winery, and his wife Brigitte tasked architecture firm GEZA with a holiday home on a hilltop location in the tiny northern Italian village of Camporosso, not far from the ski resort Monte Lussari.
At Alex Strohl and Andrea Dabene’s Nooq House in the Rocky Mountains of northwest Montana, highlights include a suspended fireplace, cathedral ceilings, and expansive windows. "The windows are my favorite feature. I've loved seeing the colors change in the fall, snow in the winter, and bears in the spring," says Andrea.
Get the whole family involved in the kitchen, whether it be teaching young ones a tried-and-true recipe or exploring a new dish together.
With so much time spent at home, more and more folks are fostering and adopting animals.
Get the whole family involved in the kitchen, whether it be teaching young ones a tried-and-true recipe or exploring a new dish together.
The all-electric kitchen features oak cabinetry and a marble countertop.
Artist Cori Creed stands in the kitchen of the vacation home in rural British Columbia that she and her husband, Craig Cameron, built with their friend and architect, Kevin Vallely. Cori made the ceramic dinnerware and pendants, while Craig built the kitchen island and installed the plywood ceiling with the help of his stepfather.
The sitting room is an updated homage to the past that references the home’s history while keeping a distinctly contemporary vibe. "However, she did want to make one room that felt old," explains Yun.
The red wall cabinet was designed by August. The floors throughout the home were replaced with wide, salvaged heart pine floorboards with radiant heat.
A collaboration between YUN Architecture and interior designer Penelope August, a renovated, 19th-century townhouse with landmark status used to be an egg and poultry distributor. Now virtually unrecognizable, the parlor floor is the home's open-plan living area. A formerly defunct fireplace was reactivated and clad with a custom-made, limestone mantle.
Claudy Jongstra kneels with a family cat in the yard behind her office and home, which she shares with her partner, Claudia Busson, and their two sons, Eabal and Jesk. Behind her is a small dinghy that the family uses to navigate the numerous irrigation canals that traverse the farmlands throughout Friesland. Despite its modest scale, Jongstra’s studio has worked on major collaborations with Hella Jongerius,Tord Boontje, Steven Holl, andRem Koolhaas, in addition tofashion design for Alexander van Slobbe and costume work for Star Wars: The Phantom Menace.
Niki Bergen and two of her children run up the hill by the guesthouse she and her partner, Andrew Zuckerman, built on their upstate New York property. The structure was designed by Levenbetts, the architecture firm also responsible for the older main house nearby.
Van Dusen began making her own clothing as a teenager after convincing her mom to buy a sewing machine she'd use to reconstruct her closet full of thrift store garments. Color was her primary muse, often favoring bright hues in unexpected combinations and graphic patterns. What she couldn't find, she created, albeit inefficiently — the only way she knew how — by assembling her own printed textiles, one element at a time.
On one side of the house, a white central staircase leads to a split-level landing the Robertsons call "the reading room." "We needed a place to hang out and for the kids to read," explains owner Vivi Nguyen-Robertson. Awaiting the birth of the couple's son, she relaxes in a built-in reading nook in the library.
Architect and metalworker Christi Azevedo transformed a 93-square-foot brick boiler room—from 1916—into a loft-like guesthouse. She made the most of the vertical space to unleash the potential of the petite project.
The architect placed the windows at Sabrina’s eye level so that she’d be able to see her son, Rocco, playing in the yard outside. "You can feel the seasons changing here," says Chiavelli. "I grew up three miles from here, outside in nature. This is a house for experiencing life."
A family’s getaway in the California desert includes a spa-like main bath with a large soaking tub that connects to an outdoor shower.
Inside, rustic elements (like wood beams and whitewashed wood) nod to the structure’s former life, while walls of glass, black metal accents, and sleek furnishings give it a fresh, new look. After the renovation, the couple loved the guesthouse so much they decided to make it their full-time dwelling.
No whiteware here. In this moody apartment in Berlin, multi-toned charcoal gray subway tiles make up the backsplash, which contrasts with the pop of rosy color on the kitchen cabinets.
Using wood pallets, a common shipping material,  is a cost-effective (and, if they're reused, also eco-friendly) solution for a low-lying mattress that doesn't sit directly on the floor. Its wood construction pairs well with just about any color palette, and it can also be painted.
The sunken living room is just one of many grade changes inside the structure. “We were adamant that we didn’t want something domestic,” says Andrew. “We wanted something surprising, that was hyper-animated, and that, when you moved through it, changed all the time.” The sofa, designed by the couple and Levenbetts, is upholstered in cotton velvet. The Habibi side tables are by Philipp Mainzer for e15, the fireplace tools by Fort Standard, and the doors by Fleetwood.
A custom walnut-and-steel coffee table from Jobe Fabrications anchors the living room. Fenton and Fenton armchairs are paired with a Texas Leather Interiors sofa. Drophouse Design crafted the fireplace copper wrap, and Thomas Studio and Foundry treated the metal to create a unique copper patina that matches the kitchen hood fan. Limestone is part of the exterior landscaping, but makes its way into the home as well to act as the base of the fireplace. Each piece is seven feet long, and puzzles together.
A tiny outbuilding offers a cozy living space inside a simple shell.
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named "Ufogel," which is a melding of the acronym UFO and "vogel," meaning bird in German.
Ryan McLaughlin watches the sunset from the deck of the 160-square-foot tiny home he built, with no prior experience, at his parents’ horse ranch in Georgetown, Texas. Soon, the trailer-mounted cabin will be moved to a vineyard, where it will operate grid-free and be available to rent for short stays.
Measuring only 180 square feet, this exquisite, off-grid tiny home features a big sense of style.
Generations of family have lived on this wooded, waterfront site, where architect Will Randolph has built a weekend getaway for less than $70,000.
The Lost Whiskey Cabin stands on a rocky bluff overlooking Virginia's countryside.
Watch the Northern Lights from the comfort of your warm bed at Panorama Glass Lodge Iceland. Designed by the Estonian company ÖÖD Homes, the two 200-square-foot prefab cabins are thoughtfully made for small-space living. Each has a bedroom, living room, bathroom, and kitchen.
"We imagined how six people would use the space and developed the shape accordingly," says Hello Wood cofounder Dávid Ráday. "We took inspiration from the design of space capsules, and the cabin was refined step by step before reaching its final form."
Dining
This remote cabin in Sullivan County hovers above a steep slope, suspended by the trees that surround it.
Five tiny glass cabins on Sweden’s Henriksholm Island allow travelers to unplug from the noise of their technology-driven lifestyles. The “72 Hour Cabins” are Norwegian spruce structures that offer peace and quiet with minimally furnished yet cozy interiors.
The concrete hearth at the fireplace has angled sidewalls and a bevelled edge.
The arched windows provide a treehouse-like experience for some of the bedrooms.
With a comfy bed, a built-in kitchenette and plenty of storage, this tiny trailer will provide all the amenities needed for a quick getaway.
The entryway is tucked behind a thin steel wall, shielding it from the kitchen. The designers created a six-inch shelf on the kitchen side for storage.
Outside each of the cabins a large patio provides space to relax and dine.
The Franklin stove adds an authentic touch to the updated cabin.
“My grandfather, George Fasullo, was an architect who died before I was born,” says architect Ryan Bollom. “My mom used both of our drawings as wallpaper in the secondary living space.” During the lockdown, Bollom formed an extended bubble with his parents, and he and his wife, also an architect, used the space as an office.
Ice Green marble from Signorino Stone forms the backsplash and countertops. The island bench was custom built with 2PAC grooved MDF in the front and Tasmanian oak legs. The bespoke kitchen hood is made from folded metal with a bronze detail seam up the middle.
The timber used in the scaffolding and off-cuts from the framing were kept and redeployed for furniture and accents on the walls—such as the timber block in the primary kitchen.
The Deep Thoughts Chaise from Blu-dot sits atop a rug from Rugs.com.
Den's A frame house is designed with 1,000 square feet of living space.
Our experts advise on choosing an area rug by pile, construction, size, and placement—and how much it’ll cost.
Floor-to-ceiling shelves and storage bookend a cabinet that conceals the television.
The dining room, which features an original pressed-metal ceiling detail and fireplace, has a large window that opens directly to the sidewalk. The step down from the dining room to the living room represents the junction between the original terrace and the newly built addition. The exposed steel beam running above this junction is also new. "In opening up the house to the courtyard, we had to remove two walls," says Joe. "The steel beams and column support the upper floor of the original house in this area."
The oak ceilings are about 16.5 feet high in the living and dining room.
The dining and kitchen space opens up directly to an expanse of grass that leads to the water’s edge.
The living room is furnished with pieces by some of the greatest names in vintage design, such as Hans Wegner, Eero Saarinen and Charlotte Perriand, and also more recent pieces from the 1900s by Philippe Starck, among others.
The cabinet has an antique look, but it was designed and painted by Zachary.
Zachary designed a new cabinet in walnut to anchor the room. The wood tones are a warm counterpoint to the butter-yellow sofa. The coffee table belonged to the owners.
In Guang’s office, Chen designed a lacquered desk to join the Philippe Starck chair, Louis Poulsen desk lamp, and Chinese folk "drum stools."

Dwell's favorite photos of modern homes and design ideas. From midcentury gems, prefabricated units, and eye-opening renovations, to shipping container construction and custom trailers and campers, these projects display the best from Dwell Magazine and submitted by the Dwell community. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.