26715 Home Design Ideas and Photos

Karen White, David MacNaughtan, and their sons, Griffin and Finlay, hang out on the front deckof their narrow home in Toronto’s leafy Roncesvalles neighborhood. A narrow modernist composition of glass panes and purple brick, the house slips like a bookmark between two older buildings, a bright three-story abode on a lot narrower than most suburban driveways.  Photo by Dean Kaufman. Read more about the small house here.
Since surrounding neighbors can overlook the one-story property, Thomson created a roof detail that is environmentally friendly and attractive: “the bio-diverse [green] roof is planted with indigenous species of flowers and grasses,” he says.
Emilio Fuscaldo sits in the garden outside the brick house that he designed for himself and his partner, Anna Krien, on a small subdivided lot in Coburg, a suburb north of Melbourne, Australia. Photo by Nic Granleese.
Sliding doors cast shadows across the concrete floor.
Unsightly service elements of the kitchen are tucked into the central core of the home, while a furniture-like L is situated in the rear corner and visible from the living area. Stevens had the 42 George Nelson cabinet pulls made with a CNC-router system based on an original.
Ray Kappe relaxes in the central living space, which offers views onto other shared family zones. Behind him is a view down into his office. Half a level up, Shelly Kappe stands at the entrance to the upper family room.
The concrete wall mimics the slope of the hill outside as a reference to early Maori structures that were dug into the land. The simple kitchen has strandboard cabinetry and an MDF island that conceals a fireplace at one end. The ceramic works on the built-in seat at right are by Raewyn Atkinson and Robyn Lewis.
The planks inside the house blend into those on the small porch just outside. It's a nice touch that helps marry the outdoors with the home's interior.
Winged light bulbs, part of an Ingo Maurer fixture, bring levity to Hill's bathroom. The space features a zinc wall by Houston metalworker George Sacaris, who also did the bathroom and kitchen cabinets.
There are precious few decorative flourishes in the house; the architects put their faith in line, form, and materials. Concrete, stainless steel, and birch were used in the kitchen, where not an inch of space goes unused.
The house weathered a recent tornado that caused significant damage to much of the property. Ellzey sees the house as an outgrowth of Frank Lloyd Wright’s experiments with modular housing. "For me, it was in that spirit of, what can it mean for homebuilding?"
On the shores of Moose Lake, Wisconsin, the inspiration for Roger Scommegna’s Aperture House came from the $9.99 bottles of wine produced at his Signal Ridge Vineyard.
In September 2009, Bill and Daniel Yudchitz bought a 2.78-acre lot that had water access to Lake Superior’s Chequamegon Bay. Many of the properties they looked at required a larger minimum building footprint than they desired; their cabin needed to be small to reduce its environmental impact.
On one end of the top-floor communal space is a white volume that neatly contains the kitchen, pantry, and toilet.
The deck rises up in sections to become sun loungers.
Above the garage, the sturdy concrete eaves support a pool and terrace on the upper level.
Through a winding gravel path cutting through the native vegetation, one arrives at a parking garage, which is located the below the roof’s large, overhanging eaves.
The upper floor has high ceilings, and is designed as a single, flowing space that opens seamlessly to the outdoors on all sides.
The topmost level is much more transparent and permeable compared to the rest of the home.
On one end of the top floor communal space, is a white volume, which neatly contains the kitchen, pantry, and toilet.
The lower level has its own separate entrance for privacy.
The third level can be totally opened up to fuse indoor and outdoor space.
Three bedrooms and bathrooms are located on the first level. Each room can adapt to accommodate a varying number of occupants.
The house is split into three levels.
Naturally rusted steel sheathes the cabins that Malek Alqadi built on a 1954 homestead outside Joshua Tree National Park. “I loved the idea of stitching the existing structure back together, reinforcing it, and giving it life again without compromising the beautiful setting it’s in,” he says.
Alqadi topped the second cabin, which houses a water tank and the site’s mechanicals, with a north-facing deck for sunbathing and sleeping under the stars. In addition to a heated bed, it includes a bio-ethanol fireplace and a projector for watching movies on the back wall. A custom cover fits over the opening when rain is expected.
The sofa and dining chairs are from IKEA. The solar refrigerator is from EcoSolarCool. A ladder leads to the loft, where a solar-powered skylight from Velux is fitted with a rain sensor.
Evenings around the firepit are particularly magical.
A large rock from the property provides seating in the shower.
The dining area features a Snaregade Table by Norm Architects for Menu.
The house has smart locks by August, Caséta wireless controls by Lutron, and a hub security system by Scout.
Instead of installing rooftop solar panels, Alqadi and his friend and partner in the venture, Hillary Flur, built a “solar tree” to provide energy.
The deck connecting the two buildings has an outdoor rain shower and a soaking tub, both part of the property’s gray-water system.
The void between the cabins was an integral part of Alqadi’s vision for a retreat that fosters communion with the environment. A ladder affixed to the side of the smaller cabin leads to the stargazing portal. Electromagnetic shutters are operated via an iPad.
The washroom features a sink from Kraus and a faucet by Delta Faucet.
Raw plywood contrasts with dark plaster in the 460-square-foot main cabin, whose communal space encompasses an efficient living/dining area and kitchen.
There used to be walls; now Barbara Hill's bed offers views not just of Houston, but also a French farm table surrounded by a sextet of black and white Harry Bertoia chairs for Knoll.
The Fung/Blatt family enjoys the backyard of their Mount Washington home. Despite its 5,000-square-foot lot, the house is just 1,640 square feet. Michael Blatt admits, “If we could add anything to this house, it would be five walk-in closets.”
Though the fire pit was “kind of an after-thought,” says Hannah, the family uses it year-round. “In the spring and fall, it warms you up on cool nights, and in the summer, it just adds ambience.”
The kitchen cabinetry, custom designed by the architects, is smooth brown teak. The faucet is by Hansgrohe, and the dishwasher is by Bosch.
The Japanese-style bathroom, which is clad in teak, features a matching tub and sink by Bath in Wood.
Among the first Passive Houses in France, this bamboo-clad farmhouse by the Parisian firm Karawitz Architecture only uses a tenth of the energy a conventionally constructed home does. Photo by Nicholas Calcott.
The engawa deck is a traditional Japanese feature. It's a place where guests are often greeted to sit with a casual cup of tea. The David and Mayuko also uses it as a viewing porch toward the back yard for when the kids play in the grass.
Designed to be a welcoming space for visitors, the glassy foyer addition is clearly defined against the more private interior of the house.
Photo by Patrick Barta
Lightweight corrugated zinc roof sheeting clads the exterior.
David Ferguson of Kimo Estate took construction into his own hands in a two-person owner-builder team.
The Caroma shower head meets the highest level of Water Efficiency Labelling and Standards (WELS) at three stars.
In this glass-enclosed master bedroom, a LC4 armchair faces the master bed. The moveable frame adjusts along the base, allowing the sitter to switch from upright to full recline, or lounge at a number of other sitting angles.
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In Marquina and Font’s living room, a pair of kilim-covered chairs by Philippe Xerri, a chest of drawers by Piet Hein Eek, and a handmade Tunisian rug provide bursts of color amidst the overall scheme of white, ecru, and cream.

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.