159 Living Room Corner Fireplace Design Photos And Ideas

Interior designer Heidi Lachapelle chose unfussy furnishings with clean lines. “Nothing should feel decorative or unnecessary,” she says. “We looked for things that would age beautifully to speak to the wabi-sabi concept.” The oak daybed is by Bautier, the indoor/outdoor rug is by Dash & Albert, and the trapezoidal cushions on the concrete bench nod to similar ones that the wife saw at Georgia O’Keefe’s home and studio. The Scandinavian-inspired fireplace throws heat from two sides.
The wife notes that the pattern on the concrete reminds her of a floor she once saw in Nepal.
A floor lamp nearly eight feet tall anchors the seating area in the living area. Ceilings that are 12 feet tall at the highest point help the room feel expansive. “We needed to find a way to define different areas in a relatively tight space,” Lachapelle says. It’s the clients’ first experience with an open floor plan. “We raised our kids in an old Victorian, and the farmhouse we live in now is chopped up into tiny rooms save for the studio we just added,” the husband says.
The main living area features a black pellet stove in the corner and a raw-edge, white oak window seat, which add rustic elements to the clean, bright space.
Main living space
Shawn loves the play of colors in the new space, from the pink pantry door to the aqua fireplace to the multicolored chips in the new terrazzo flooring. “We knew we wanted something really interesting and sturdy,” says Shawn of the tile, which is the Frammeti style by Del Conca.
An aqua Malm fireplace warms up a corner. The pink, green, and yellow stripes now reach the skylights and extend over an integrated storage space to the floor. “My husband and I, we both actually hate having a TV visible to guests, but it’s a necessary evil,” says Shawn. “So how do you make that interesting and without it being too busy? [The rainbow stripe] creates an element that draws your eye away.”
A relaxed living room with outdoor access occupies the addition.
The curvature keeps the home cozy as it breaks up the open-concept main spaces. In the family room, there is a fluted concrete fireplace.
The simple living room features a wood-burning stove to keep the space cozy in colder months. The interior material palette was kept simple and practical. The ceilings and trims are pine, while doors are crafted from hemlock timber.
The living room includes a Retro Burn fireplace and a coffee table Thomas made herself from boulders found on the property.
With a coat of paint and new appliances and furnishings, the 880-square-foot space maintains its cozy cabin feel, while also feeling fresh and new.
During storm season, nature’s awe-inspiring light show is on full display through the oversized windows.
A classic Jeanneret Chandigarh armchair sits by the fireplace.
The Regency fireplace is from the local building center, where all the materials and fixtures were sourced to accommodate the challenges of building in a remote area. “It’s not a fancy Scandinavian model or anything,” says architect Tom Knezic. “It was about finding something that didn’t look old-fashioned at the local building center.”
The white gallery walls and architectural ceilings were designed to beautifully display works of art in a museum-like setting.
Saksi's "Battle Of Harapouri
The interiors of the home feature light wood-paneled ceilings, large picture windows, and exclusive custom furniture and lighting also designed by Aalto.
For a home in West Hollywood, Romanek punctuates the living room with a sunny pair of Facett chairs by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec.
During frigid winter months, heat from the living room fireplace is strategically routed through the home through the opening and closing of shoji doors. When the fireplace is turned off at the end of the night, upper-zone shoji doors are opened to direct heat to the main bedroom.
The windows are by Albertini—and “Albertini's grandson himself came to look at them,” Faulkner says. The living room has a Stem Floor arching lamp, a Catellani & Smith lamp, the owner’s coffee table, and colorful artwork.
The living room includes a Tai Ping rug, Philip Arctander armchairs, a Marco Fine Furniture sofa, and a MRCW Design Build coffee table.
The artwork is titled "Crashing Buffalo" and is by Tucson/Los Angeles artist Ishi Glinsky.
The Adrian Pearsall sofa was sourced from The Swanky Abode on 1st Dibs, and the fire tools are also from the Sunshine Shop, a local vintage store.
Regan Baker Design teamed up with contractor Markus Burkhardt and Sagan Design Group to design and build Tahoe’s first Passive House for a family of five, incorporating their vintage and heirloom quilts.
The Juniper Room. As for the name, Rich explains, "there's a big Juniper plant I initially wanted to get rid of to make this room happen, but my contractor told me I couldn't do that because it was a 500 year old Juniper and that we had to build around it. So we did."
The stone fireplace and concrete floors add to the earthy feel of the home. The living room features a sectional by Focus One Home.
Some of the furnishings came from the homeowners’ Dallas home, including the wooden chairs they purchased 35 years ago. The sofa is the Madison Sleeper Sofa from Bo Concept, while the side table is from Target. The lamp is from CB2. A British, antique officer’s cabinet contrasts with a modern bookshelf from Crate and Barrel.
A tired midcentury in Eagle Rock with a chalky-green facade was transformed into a warm, contemporary home for a couple and their two daughters. The original single-level house had three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a small kitchen, a concrete deck in the backyard, and an above-ground swimming pool beside the guest house. "The first thing we did was put in white oak hardwood floors throughout the house, then add the Fleetwood sliding doors off of the living room. Eventually, we added a bedroom, extended the master bedroom and added an ensuite bathroom, enclosed the washer/dryer area, which expanded the kitchen, built a wood deck, wood fences, and then remodeled the guest house. No room was untouched by the time we were finished," says Matt, a woodworker and designer who is also the founder of L.A. handcrafted furniture brand Monroe Workshop.
The living room offers a touch of Nordic simplicity with a combined steel TV unit and fireplace from Space Furniture, rattan chair from IKEA, C-shape gunmetal table from Casalife, and art from Cocoon Furnishings.
At a 1954 midcentury home in the West hills of Portland, Penny Black Interiors deftly updated the residence with standout cabinetry, carefully-selected tile, and wallpaper galore. The renovation balanced preserving the home's innate character and updating its function for modern life.
“Versus a flat ceiling or a flat roof, when you have that bolted ridge above you, it creates a completely other type of interior experience for the client, which we find people love, we love ourselves, and it is much more human,” says Klymson.
Thirteen windows in the apartment help maximize the fantastic views. The seating—including a sectional from West Elm and daybed from BoConcept—is now complemented by a fireplace specified by the firm.
The living room includes contemporary furnishings in a minimalist palette; a built-in, concrete-and-glass fire pit, and original brickwork.
The hexagonal living room includes an Irving Harper and George Nelson Marshmallow Sofa, Rottet's Bent Metal Rectangle Cocktail Table in polished stainless steel, and Kiki Smith’s Self-Portrait. "The Kiki Smith piece I had rolled up," she says. "I had never had the opportunity—or high-enough ceilings—to hang it before."
Tigg Coll Architects took a new approach to a straightforward town house renovation and expansion in London. The home’s rear extension has its own personality, with with pivoting glass doors, sharp red support beams, and a wood-burning fireplace. The overhanging concrete plinth acts as a hearth or, as Tigg imagines it, a sort of contemporary inglenook. Wood piles neatly between the beam and wall. The fireplace, a Stovax Riva 2, is flanked by a Lampe Gras wall lamp; firewood is cleverly stored in the narrow space between the fireplace and the red support beam, creating a fun moment of practical texture in the room.
Scandinavian architecture firm C.F. Møller designed a serene, zinc-clad home in Aarhus, Denmark. On the interior, a large, three-sided fireplace incorporated into a floating wall helps connect two spaces and warm up the home, and the wall also incorporates a purpose-designed niche filled with firewood for easy re-stoking.
The family cat, Rey, steps in front of the concrete fireplace in the living room. Floor-to-ceiling windows enhance the indoor-outdoor connection.
“Instead of using a typical frame system, we created frameless windows by burying aluminum channels into the floors and walls,” says Richard. “It kept our glazing budget much lower than normal.” The sofas feature custom upholstery by Inverse Project and HDM.
"When the windows open, it becomes a large terrace open to the outside along both diagonal axis," says architect Cristián Izquierdo Lehmann.
Neutral tones abound, giving the inn a warm and inviting vibe that melds with the landscape.
Throughout the home, the floors were replaced with light hardwood to make the space feel more modern and open. Baer brought in a MBH Sectional in White Linen and a Hotel Collection metal-and-stone coffee table alongside the Sams International Atlas Woolen Rug. In this space, the Raskinds added a touch of Hollywood glamour with the red velvet midcentury chairs. They finished off the look by painting the original fireplace with Cover of Night by Dunn Edwards and added hexagonal tiles at the base.
The large living room also includes an original wood-burning brick fireplace. Solid mahogany floors contrast with the freshly painted walls that flow along the gabled ceiling.
The family room on the lower floor opens up the swimming pool and hot tub.
A glass-walled bridge links the master bedroom with the office on the upper floor. The layout creates a double-height space for the living area and keeps the drama of the exposed concrete ceiling visible from the ground floor.
“The clients requested we use ‘cirmolo,’  a local type of wood with a strong fragrance capable of spreading healthy aromas around the house,” say the architects. They used the timber, also known as Swiss pine, for accent walls and the majority of the custom furniture.
The rooms showcase Scandinavian design with simple luxury.
The living room features a brick-inlay fireplace and a wall of glass with serene forest views.
The footprint on Frank Lloyd Wright's Mäntylä House has more than 80 points, some 30 degrees, some 60 degrees, others 180. Wright used the most common material, cinder block, to create angles out of a hollow core of masonry unit.
According to Tom Papinchak, president of Usonian Preservation, the restoration was the most difficult part of relocating Frank Lloyd Wright's Mäntylä House. "The family raised several children in house, so there was wear and tear," says Papinchak. "We questioned whether we restore it to its original, pristine state. There is a fine line there." Ultimately, they did restore 40 linear feet of cypress.
The workspace, living room, fireplace, and dining area are all set within a square space.
Long Cabin dining and living rooms.
The renovation referenced original drawings and historic photographs, and was sensitive to the home's original design. The living room once featured built-in cabinets and a sofa, similar to the current configuration.
An asymmetrical stone fireplace is a dramatic focal point in the open plan.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.