Kids Room Light Hardwood Floors Design Photos and Ideas

Eivind wanted to find a contemporary, minimalist take on the <i>hytte</i> that would still evoke the requisite sense of <i>koselig</i> (warmth, contentment, coziness) he recalls from his childhood. Vaulted ceilings in a warm, pale pine paneling are juxtaposed with glossy black accents. Light pours through the panoramic windows that blur the line between indoor and outdoor.
In a spare bedroom/playroom located in another section of the house, Berg played with juxtapositions of shapes, installing an oak-wrapped, triangular reading nook inset with a circular window.
Only a set of sliding doors separates the kids’ room from the master bedroom in a Toronto, Ontario, home. When the time is right, there's a track inlaid in the ceiling for a four-panel bifold wall to divide the space into two private rooms for the children. 

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In the kids’ room, a pendant from Cedar &amp; Moss hangs above custom gabled beds with integrated lighting. The walls are painted Tranquility by Benjamin Moore.
The long-leaf-pine roof decking was salvaged from the original home and used on the ceiling in the new playroom.
The Marigold wallpaper from York Wallcoverings adorns one room, its turquoise and saffron shades shaping the color scheme.
Built-in shelves and storage save space in another bedroom.
The nursery is situated in the chamfered corner of the 1950s apartment house.
Custom bunk beds in the kids’ room were designed by ALAO and fabricated by Amber Construction &amp; Design. The quilts are from Cold Picnic and the stool is by Alvar Aalto for Artek.
The Nesting White and Natural Play Table and Chairs Set is from Crate&Kids.
Everett's built-in desk features trophies, a globe, and a chair by Urban Outfitters.
Amelia's built-in desk features collected treasures and mementos and is flanked by a mint-green chair by Industry West.
This children’s room and playroom caters to one family’s young kids with built-in cabinetry that allows the mess to be hidden away. Hufft designed this marker-board table, which was cut in the shape of Missouri. The ceiling features abstract details from Thomas Hart Benton paintings.
A bunk room is located at the end of the hallway, in the former office.
The bunk room is L-shaped and has two single beds. Each bed has an exterior window, as well as an interior window that looks into the house. "So, at night we can all say, ‘Goodnight,’" explains Dignard.
The team kept the skylights, and the third-floor space is primarily used as a playroom.
The fireplace was relocated to this bedroom so as to preserve it and make it a feature.
Isla's bedroom is outfitted with a metal sconce, a white-painted shelf that serves as a bedside table, and a queen-size bed, where the family likes to read together.
Herringbone floors and pink walls brighten the girl’s bedroom.
The walls of the room are lined with easily-accessible shelves and cabinets that are perfect for books and toys.
In the child’s room, floor-to-ceiling built-in closets maximize storage and a loft bed creates space for a play station underneath.
A view of the beamed interior from the loft is almost hypnotizing. "Functions and daylight float through the house, creating an extraordinary spatial atmosphere," says Valbæk.
Online art lessons are making it easy to prioritize art, which can be a great escape for kids stuck at home all day.
All the experts agree that it is important for children to have a designated workspace.
The wooden fold-down, child-sized secretary desk is by Harto and the pendant lighting is by Hans Agne Jakobsson.
The children's room was the former galley kitchen with bunk beds by Oliver Furniture with rounded edges and storage underneath.
A picture window in the playroom floor allows for parents and child to see each other, while also giving the child a designated play space and storage for toys.
This room had multiple constraints: three walls had doors that could not be moved, and the remaining wall had a ceiling height that could not accommodate a loft bed. The solution was to build the custom bed, ladder, loft, and shelving unit in the middle of the room where the ceiling is peaked.
Now, the playroom can be accessed by the son’s bedroom or at the hallway. Custom woodwork fashions storage and a window seat.
The two kids’ rooms are connected by a child-sized hole in the wall. Cuddington notes that, when they get older, they will have the option to cover the opening with drywall if they like. A triple-glazed Loewen window looks out at a fiery red maple. The globe lamp is by Seagull Lighting.
Now, a custom built-in platform combines storage solutions with a mattress for sleeping, and doubles as a cozy, story-time nook. "When we were creating the room for their daughter, they wanted a little magic door into her place," says Klimoski, so they inserted curved pocket doors. The firm also designed the custom table lamp on the platform, made from Japanese origami paper and cast porcelain.
The house has three bedrooms, with two for Edwards Anker’s children. Each has a mezzanine space with ladder access, so they have a place to retreat with friends.
A cozy hang-out space in a second-floor bedroom in the stables is created by a mezzanine floor.
A thin wall of glass divides the entrance from a recreation area in one corner of the main floor.
A climbing wall and monkey bars ensure that the kids have plenty of space to goof off.
The playroom wall mimics the exterior.
All of the timber throughout the project was supplied directly from Denmark by PA Savværk Korinth.
A colorful playroom for the kids.
The children's bedroom.
In an otherwise tame Tribeca apartment designed by London-based Melanie Williams Bespoke Interiors, a splash of color in the nursery adds a fun and playful feel to the space. Gray and yellow curtains are set up to create a little theater space in the bedroom.
Architect Bergendy Cooke, who worked for Zaha Hadid and Peter Marino before returning to her home country in 2007, is an admirer of the strong, sculptural architectural forms that appear in Japanese and Spanish architecture. Outside Queenstown, she put her ideas into practice in a home that would be the benchmark for bc+a studio, her own venture. The combination bunk bed and playhouse is a whimsical gesture the architect designed specifically for her two daughters. The spaces are organized in such a way that they can play independently or together.
Awkward sloping ceilings are put to good use in this family apartment known as the Starburst House in Beijing, China. Across from the living lounge, tucked under the mezzanine study, is a child’s playroom. Mountain-shaped wall cushions line the wall, echoing the peaked ceiling.
Area rugs add warmth to the reading stations.
This sleeping area includes a bookshelf and sconce.
Upstairs, the gables of the sawtooth roof house individual bedrooms: two for children, and a larger master suite.