103 Exterior Metal Siding Material House Cabin Design Photos And Ideas

Winkelman Architecture delivers grown-up summer-camp vibes with this unassuming retreat on the coast of Maine.
A simple floor plan emphasizes the rugged materiality of this elongated, cabin-style home in Valle de Bravo.
The firm wanted the materiality of the cabin to be "in harmony with the site," says Shaw. "So, that over time, the building could weather gracefully and the site around it would change, and they would do so in tandem."
The materials were kept simple: a foundation of board-formed concrete that reveals the wood grain of the boards used to make it, Cor-Ten steel siding that will develop a characterful patina, and rafters made of hemlock, a local species. "In terms of materials, we wanted the full exterior of the building to be something that would weather gracefully, that required very little maintenance, and that had a long life cycle," says Shaw.
Sited on a rock ledge, the Far Cabin’s screened porch cantilevers over the forest floor for a tree house effect.
The Far Cabin by Winkelman Architecture is set on the forested coast of Maine.
Constructed with sustainably sourced lumber and large, double-pane windows, Studio Shed’s all-season Signature Series units are popularly used as backyard offices.
Architect Eric Logan took minimalism to the max when he rebuilt his family cabin on a Wyoming mountainside.
Except for a few chairs and a wood stove, there isn't much to Eric Logan's two-room cabin in the forest of Wyoming's Casper Mountain. After the original antiques-filled family cabin was destroyed in a brush fire, Logan, principal at Carney Logan Burke Architects, built this minimalist iteration to reinforce the importance of one's relationship with nature, magnified by the post-and-beam structure comprised of charred trees.
The floor to ceiling glass sliding doors opens the living spaces to the surrounding waterfront and landscape
Collector's Retreat by Heliotrope Architects is situated at the top of a steep hill, with southwest views and a forest on the opposite side. Outside, a carport doubles as a dining terrace in inclement weather, while the lower terrace with the fire pit serves as the primary focus for summer leisure.
The patio of Collector's Retreat  by Heliotrope Architects allows the homeowners to gaze out into a sea of trees.
"The 900-square-foot cabin perches on one piece of granite, projecting precariously over a steep drop-off to afford dramatic eastern views across the valley below," says Isamu Kanda, principal at I-Kanda.
The Element House by MOS Architects stands on pylons, creating the illusion of it hovering over the desert floor. Nine thermal chimneys, one of which can be seen right, channel hot air out from the interior living areas.
Surrounded by wheat fields on a high-altitude plateau stands a small glass house and a solid, traditional barn. The owners, inspired by Philip Johnson’s Glass House, wanted a refuge that opens up to the prairie and mountains.
Van Beek’s extra space is home to her office. She works on a Tense table by Piergiorgio and Michele Cazzaniga and Flow chairs by Jean Marie Massaud, both for MDF Italia.
The project’s unique challenges—a tight budget and steep, difficult terrain—led architecture firm _naturehumaine to a creative solution that gave the house its delightfully sculptural appearance. Making the first floor’s envelope slightly narrower than the top one’s saved money while minimizing the amount of excavation required.
On an island 20 miles off the coast of Maine, a writer, with the help of his daughter, built not only a room, but an entire green getaway of his own.
Architect Jesse Garlick’s rural Washington vacation home references its rugged surroundings. The steel cladding has developed a patina similar to the ochre-red color of bedrock found in the area.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
The retreat's exterior is clad in cedar shingles to give it a tree house feel. The shingles will weather to gray over time. Dutton wanted to avoid having the cabin stand out, instead revealing itself gradually against the surrounding landscape.
One of the most significant of Mies' works, the Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois, was built between 1945 and 1951 for Dr. Edith Farnsworth as a weekend retreat. The home embraces his concept of a strong connection between structure and nature, and may be the fullest expression of his modernist ideals.
Inspired by a primitive tent, this A-frame cabin is a simple one-bedroom retreat nestled in the New Zealand rain forest.
Designed by Savioz Fabrizzi Architects, the Tracuit Hut is a mountain shelter run by the Swiss Alpine Club. The shelter is located above Zinal in the canton of Valais, at an elevation of 10,780 feet. It's named after the Tracuit Pass in which it is located.
This cabin has a commodious kitchen and living area that encourages family and friends to come together for meals and conversation.
A shot of the two houses from across the pond. “It's campfires by the pond, dinner cooked in the wood fire oven…we are living the dream,” say the brothers.
A simple and restrained material palette kept construction costs low.
Enough House by MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects resides on Brian MacKay Lyons' Shobac farm in Nova Scotia, a campus that allows the firm to experiment with form, materiality, and building. The Cor-Ten steel cabin, which features exposed Douglas fir plywood sheathing and stained pine flooring inside, houses an intern architect.
This 1,900-square-foot home was assembled on-site in just two days with wall panels consisting of staggered 2' x 4' studs on a 2' x 8' plate, which eliminates thermal bridging and maximizes energy efficiency.
This dwelling joins a number of structures—such as a boathouse and guesthouse—owned by one family and used for vacations. They needed a new house to accommodate new generations at the reatreat.
This 1,000 square-foot weekend cabin in Mazama, Washington, is essentially a "steel box on stilts," according to the firm. The three-story structure, which includes a living room and kitchen, can be completely shuttered when the owner is away.
Rough-sawn plywood and standing-seam metal siding clad the house. “In cabins, we like to use undressed materials, which lend themselves to the simplicity of the structure,” says architect Tom Lenchek.
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The jagged edges of the roof are meant to resemble the surrounding peaks of the Cascades. The exterior HardiePanel vertical siding is painted “dark pewter” by Benjamin Moore.
A cantilevered cabin designed by R D Gentzler blends into the forest, even as it hovers above a 20-foot drop-off. Its south face is almost entirely glass, but a roof canopy limits solar gain. “We sit on the deck all afternoon watching the trees, and the time just flies by,” says resident Maricela Salas.
Short StackA tiny cabin in the Wisconsin Woods makes a big impact with Johnsen & Schmaling's innovative stacked design. The resulting cozy abode is stylish and durable, with stunning views of the surrounding landscape.
Olson Kundig Architects' Delta Shelter, in Mazama, Washington, is a 1,000 square-foot steel box home with a 200 square-foot footprint. Photo by Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects/TASCHEN.
The main entrance to the home is located opposite the door of the outbuilding.
The home also includes a small outbuilding that echoes the main building's monochromatic, gabled form.
The vertical corrugated metal siding mimics the verticality of the trees.
A large cedar deck offers outdoor entertaining opportunities. The outdoor furnishings are by COOP Etabli.
A pathway winds through the woods from the parking pad to reveal the cottage and a raised cedar walkway.
A view of the house from the southeast approach.
Nestled in the woods, Chalet Grand-Pic was completed for construction costs of approximately $227,000.
Because the studio does not have air-conditioning, it relies on natural ventilation for passive cooling. Its north orientation harnesses good solar gains.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.