774 Exterior Metal Siding Material House Design Photos And Ideas

The property is on an ex-urban infill site located on almost eight acres of a Bay Area suburb. Technically a remodel, the house utilized the footprint of the existing house as a basis for a new floor plan.
Overlooking the double-height living/dining area is the mezzanine level, where the master suite and office are located.
Ramirez and his partner, Sarah Mason Williams, dine at a sequoia table by Redwood Burl next to a hulking juniper tree that they asked the architects to preserve as a centerpiece of the property.
Recycled red bricks are used for sections of the exterior walls.
Although the orientation of the site was not ideal as the extension faces south, the strategic location of the addition and high-level kitchen window draws sunlight deep into the space in winter, while the deep window reveals restricts sunlight penetration in the summer months.
The orientation of the home captures the sunrise and moonrise over the water.
Positioned towards the north, raked ceilings and windows draw natural light into the living area, while eaves and awnings block the harsh summer sun.
front elevation - towards south
front elevation towards south....
faccade details
Made of 100-percent recyclable materials and equipped with smart home technology, this prefab known as SysHaus is a new model by a Brazilian construction and engineering start-up.
Intrigued by the "smart, simple things" being done with modular housing, Will Arnett tapped architect Suchi Reddy and prefab company LivingHomes to design a house that merges the best of on-site and factory construction. The "Arrested Development" and "LEGO Movie" actor’s new home, completed in 2017, faces down a verdant canyon in Beverly Hills.
Priced at $419,9000, The Cocoa Beach is a three-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath residence of 1,560 square feet. It boasts a striking butterfly standing-seam metal roof and exterior stonework.
Set on a 17,000-square-foot lot, the home commands impressive views in Silver Lake.
Nine shipping containers form the basis of this new multigenerational house near Denver.
Designed by Olson Kundig with interiors by Geremia Design, False Bay Residence takes cues from the surrounding agricultural buildings on the site. A steeply pitched roof, open interior, loft space, and overall height resonate with the vernacular of the area.
The architects reused and enlarged the steel frame and ground slab to preserve the shed’s original form while cladding the structure in new materials sympathetic to the rural vernacular.
The building is clad in horizontal shot-blasted larch boards and vertically oriented galvanized steel fins. The cladding varies in height and width to create a patterned facade.
Walls of glass run up the east and west sides of the house, blurring the boundary between indoors and out.
The sedum green roof by Skygarden helps to manage stormwater.
The two units in the duplex share a wall in the main house, so Rios continued the mirrored effect by placing the shipping containers side by side about 10 feet away from the home. Cut into the sides, the windows allow natural light to illuminate the shipping container and are designed to give parents a view of the kids playing in the backyard.
Rios asked architect Reynolds to derive a design from the shipping containers. The duplex takes the shape of stacked volumes clad with vertical and horizontal Hardie boards. The covered patio features clear-coated cedar wood.
The modular appearance of the duplex, clad in white Hardie plank siding, mimics the look of a two-story container home. With large windows and 11-foot-tall ceilings, the two-bedroom, three-bath residence feels more spacious than its 1,484 square feet. On the ground floor, the living, dining, and kitchen areas flow into one another; potential guests in the shipping container also have easy access to a full bath of their own. A steel-and-wood floating staircase leads to the second floor, which holds two bedrooms with patio access.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
A strip of clerestory windows brings in lots of natural light to the living room, while their high sills encourage privacy from the lane.
Guest House - view to Main House
In the Dolomite mountains, an angular copper-clad apartment building echoes the topography of its site. Photos by Hertha Hurnaus
Designed by Szu-Ping Patricia Chen Suchart and Thamarit Suchart of Chen + Suchart Studio, the Staab residence stands in stark contrast to its suburban context but in harmony with the Sonoran Desert.
This dwelling joins a number of structures—such as a boathouse and guesthouse—owned by one family and used for vacations. They needed a new house to accommodate new generations at the reatreat.
This 1,000 square-foot weekend cabin in Mazama, Washington, is essentially a "steel box on stilts," according to the firm. The three-story structure, which includes a living room and kitchen, can be completely shuttered when the owner is away.
This quaint cabin is located on Ragged Island, 20 miles off the coast of Maine. Photo by: Eirik Johnson
The jagged edges of the roof are meant to resemble the surrounding peaks of the Cascades. The exterior HardiePanel vertical siding is painted “dark pewter” by Benjamin Moore.
A cantilevered cabin designed by R D Gentzler blends into the forest, even as it hovers above a 20-foot drop-off. Its south face is almost entirely glass, but a roof canopy limits solar gain. “We sit on the deck all afternoon watching the trees, and the time just flies by,” says resident Maricela Salas.
Short StackA tiny cabin in the Wisconsin Woods makes a big impact with Johnsen & Schmaling's innovative stacked design. The resulting cozy abode is stylish and durable, with stunning views of the surrounding landscape.
Olson Kundig Architects' Delta Shelter, in Mazama, Washington, is a 1,000 square-foot steel box home with a 200 square-foot footprint. Photo by Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects/TASCHEN.
Detailing of laser-cut aluminum panels at rear façade.
The home’s dramatic rear façade is composed of perforated metal screens, by Flynn & Enslow, attached to Fleetwood windows. The second floor bump out is cantilevered with no structural post below.
The rear façade is illuminated at night.
When Brill purchased his residence, a onetime warehouse for mid-century lighting fixtures, it was subdivided. He and architect Tony Unruh gutted the 1,800-square-foot building completely and created an open floor plan for Brill's living areas and practice space.
Project Name: Desert Canopy House

Website: http://www.sander-architects.com/
The second guest suite, clad in cedar and aluminum, extends over a horizontal limestone wall.
Dramatic in its horizontal expression, this private residence appears to extend into the landscape via deep overhangs and visual transparency.
The futuristic residence is defined by its natural topography emerging from the landscape, yet partially embedded within it.
Find a realtor who listens to your wish list, and who is willing to get you what you want—it can be the beginning of a beautiful friendship.
"The large, overhanging patio and timber shutters assist in eliminating unwanted afternoon sun. The remainder of spaces remain oriented north, with optimal overhangs to ensure climate comfort throughout seasons," explains Engelbrecht.
The home at dusk.
The façade juxtaposes the rich oxidized patina of Cor-ten steel with the deep, earthy tones of reclaimed redwood beams.
The entrance of the home stands out against the blue California sky.
The hillside home is nestled into its surroundings and enjoys breathtaking views of Mt. Diablo.
Pathways meander around the property, which is filled with oak and fruit trees. In fact, the expansive, gently sloped hillside would be an ideal spot for a future vineyard or olive trees grove.
The deceptively simple design makes it a well-recognized masterpiece of midcentury design.
Nestled into its Laurel Canyon location, the home overlooks a shallow rectangular pool.
Australian spotted gum wood was used for sections of the exterior wall.
Tim Sharpe and Rani Blancpain wanted a home that would allow them to enjoy an indoor-outdoor lifestyle.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.