283 Exterior Metal Siding Material Cabin Design Photos And Ideas

Winkelman Architecture delivers grown-up summer-camp vibes with this unassuming retreat on the coast of Maine.
On Bainbridge Island, Jim and Hannah Cutler created a cabin for reading and working. Sited just steps from the main house, it’s a welcoming retreat that the father and daughter share.
A simple floor plan emphasizes the rugged materiality of this elongated, cabin-style home in Valle de Bravo.
David has built a number of screens and fences around the two cabins to increase privacy. "We now have a good feel of rustic isolation," says Diane.
The logs stacked between trees give the cabin a wood supply for the wood burning stove which can heat the whole place in winter and cuts down on electricity. "The guys are out chopping and splitting wood every visit," says Diane.
The breezeway between the main cabin and the summer porch acts as a third living space in the summer and on mild spring and fall days, linking the separate structures. “The walls slanting over the breezeway create an implied arch between the cabin and the summer porch, lending a sense of intimacy to the heart of the house,” says Diane.
“It was very important to me that the cabin be low to the ground,” says Diane. “I love the forest floor and the sway of our huge ponderosas, so I wanted as little disruption of the natural ecosystem as possible—a request which our builder, Trevor, honored admirably.”
Fifteen years ago, the “rickety” cabins that the family had built over the years on their lakeside property were reassessed as lakeshore homes, and the family’s taxes soared. They decided to subdivide the lots—they sold two, and three of her brothers took lakeside lots, while Diane and another brother took back lots. The old boxcar has been preserved and encased in one of her brother’s lake homes. “I didn’t want to build a lake house,” she says. “I wanted to give my grandchildren the old boxcar experience of freedom and simplicity. I wanted them to be able to hear the wind, feel the rain, and be one step from nature.”
Diane Douglas’s family has owned five acres of land by the lake since 1933, and her grandfather had dragged an old boxcar to the side of the lake by tractor. “When we came as kids, we’d turn off the paved road and drive on a dirt track through a ponderosa forest to the lakeshore,” she says. “I couldn’t wait for that first scent of pine.”
The firm wanted the materiality of the cabin to be "in harmony with the site," says Shaw. "So, that over time, the building could weather gracefully and the site around it would change, and they would do so in tandem."
The materials were kept simple: a foundation of board-formed concrete that reveals the wood grain of the boards used to make it, Cor-Ten steel siding that will develop a characterful patina, and rafters made of hemlock, a local species. "In terms of materials, we wanted the full exterior of the building to be something that would weather gracefully, that required very little maintenance, and that had a long life cycle," says Shaw.
Sited on a rock ledge, the Far Cabin’s screened porch cantilevers over the forest floor for a tree house effect.
The Far Cabin by Winkelman Architecture is set on the forested coast of Maine.
GreenSpur and McAllister Architects imagined a cabin sided with Cor-Ten steel, glass, and shou sugi ban–treated cedar for a wooded property outside of Washington, DC.
The exterior of Site Shack is covered in steel panels that are bolted to the framing. Look closely and you won’t see any visible fasteners, as Powers Construction’s welder was fastidious, creating a seamless shell with just steel and glass.
Naturally rusted steel sheathes the cabins that Malek Alqadi built on a 1954 homestead outside Joshua Tree National Park. "I loved the idea of stitching the existing structure back together, reinforcing it, and giving it life again without compromising the beautiful setting it’s in," he says.
The ultimate escape for forest bathing, Denmark’s Løvtag is a tree house hotel that features three cabins that embrace Scandinavian minimalism. With tree trunks intersecting the interior, large windows, and a rooftop deck, these treehouses promise to make you feel at one with nature.
Drawing inspiration from fire towers and Nordic folklore, the PAN Treetop Cabins are two 431-square-feet lofted A-frames that sleep six people each. Elevated 26 feet in the air by steel poles and clad in black oxidized zinc and steel, the structures blend into the forested landscape of Eastern Norway.
Take in the Northern Lights on the Norwegian archipelago of Fleinvær, where Fordypningsrommet has four unique sleeping cabins for rent, along with other structures that house a kitchen, bath, sauna, and studio. It’s the perfect getaway for a small group, as you can rent the property (and nine structures) for a week at $4,275.
The cabin decks all face either expansive views of the ocean or the magical forest of fir trees.
Saltwater Farm is situated on the shoreline of San Juan Island, which is only accessible via sea or air.
The RAD LAB team thoughtfully placed each cabin amongst the pines to ensure quality views and a secluded experience for guests.
One of the driving principles behind the design of Saltwater Farm was to have minimal impact on the site, so the cabins sit above the uneven landscape on stilts.
Five cabins are located in the pine forest surrounding the main house. “The design for both the main house and cabins at Saltwater Farm resulted from studying traditional Pacific Northwest cabins and refining that vernacular language with one of Scandinavian minimalism,” says designer Taylor Bode.
Constructed with sustainably sourced lumber and large, double-pane windows, Studio Shed’s all-season Signature Series units are popularly used as backyard offices.
Both ÖÖD Iceland houses have a hot tub at the front overlooking the spectacular scenery. “This makes the experience even more surreal,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The glass front half of the cabin blurs boundaries between interior and exterior and completely immerses guests in the dramatic surroundings.
The cabins overlook the Hekla volcano, one of Iceland’s most active volcanoes. It is part of a 25-mile-long volcanic ridge, and during the Middle Ages it was referred to by Europeans as the "Gateway to Hell.”
The two cabins are named Freya and Alva, and feature the runes for “F” and “A” on the exterior timber wall. Signs from Nordic mythology are also found on the back of the houses. “The viking elements and the runes help the cabins fit into Icelandic history,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The harsh local climate—including strong winds and acid rain caused by the volcanic landscape—was a particular challenge. The cabin features a copper roof, which is one of the few materials that can cope with acid rain.
Two cabins sit in the vast, empty landscape overlooking the Hekla volcano, around three hours’ drive from Reykjavík. The front part of each cabin—for sleeping—is almost entirely glass, while the rear—where the living, kitchen and bathroom spaces are located—is clad in timber for privacy.
ÖÖD offers a range of “mirror houses”—tiny prefab cabins that are often used as guest houses, countryside getaways, and Airbnb accommodations. So far they’ve built projects in 12 different countries, including Estonia, Finland, and Norway. The ÖÖD Iceland home is a bespoke design, based on the clients’ wishes and strict local building requirements. These impacted everything from the dwelling’s structural properties and energy efficiency to the pitched roof.
Architect Eric Logan took minimalism to the max when he rebuilt his family cabin on a Wyoming mountainside.
The cabin has a sleek silhouette and an A-frame roof.
The cabins can be constructed with minimal impact on the surrounding land, as builders can transport materials by foot and using 4x4s.
ZeroCabins are constructed from a simple palette of wood and metal.
The cabins can be customized for different locations.
The two-story cabin runs solely off of solar power and rainwater.
An outdoor shower lets guests fully connect with nature.
The materiality of the cabin blends into its wooded surround.
Sliding cedar screens treated with the traditional Japanese shou sugi ban method are layered with the Cor-Ten steel siding of the exterior.
The architects situated the cabin between two old-growth oak trees so as not to disrupt the natural features of the site.
When the glass doors are pocketed, an entire corner of the building disappears and there's a feeling of being outdoors while working or spending time inside the cabin.
Glass pocket doors slide away, opening the cabin to its wooded surround. Bluestone pavers on the exterior contrast with the warm tone of the Cor-Ten steel siding.
GreenSpur and McAllister Architects imagined a cabin sided with Cor-Ten steel, glass, and shou sugi ban-treated cedar for a wooded property outside of Washington D.C.
Except for a few chairs and a wood stove, there isn't much to Eric Logan's two-room cabin in the forest of Wyoming's Casper Mountain. After the original antiques-filled family cabin was destroyed in a brush fire, Logan, principal at Carney Logan Burke Architects, built this minimalist iteration to reinforce the importance of one's relationship with nature, magnified by the post-and-beam structure comprised of charred trees.
Set on a southeast-facing slope, the AB Cabin is fitted with double-glazed windows that frame views of the town of Taihape and rolling hills beyond.
"When we bought the property it was so inexpensive that we had naturally assumed that it would be off-grid," says Copeland. "But it turned out that some wastewater drainage had recently been installed by the local authority and that powerlines were close by."
Designed to sleep eight, the flexible cabin can be used as a quiet retreat for the couple or a gathering place for family and friends.
Concrete blocks lead up to an elevated timber deck with a sliding aluminum entrance door.
The AB Cabin is set in the middle of high country with Mount Ruapehu to the north and the Ruahine Ranges to the south. The building takes inspiration from the surrounding timber-framed houses and metal-clad farm buildings.
"My goal was to carry on the client’s family legacy by creating a very special place that took inspiration from the landscape,” explains architect Tom Kundig.
Just outside Stowe, Vermont, the Barr family cabin, designed by architect Tom Kundig, sits on a hillside overlooking a dense landscape of maples, Scotch pines, and ferns. Kundig wrapped two of the cabin’s three stories in Cor-Ten steel, a signature material for the designer.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.