167 Exterior House Building Type Cabin Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

Dynamic rooflines create interesting forms while simultaneously opening clerestory windows perfect for letting in natural light to each studio.
The main house includes a generous amount of outdoor space, extending the living area into the surrounding forest.
One of the tenets of Treebones Resort is to build shelters that perch lightly on the land. The Autonomous Tent doesn't require a foundation, instead resting on a deck that is held to the ground with screws.
These rustic roof beams were also recovered from the barn and support a covered patio at the rear of the Bunkie.
Located about 100 miles north of Toronto, the Bunkie overlooks the Lake of Bays and is adjacent to the client’s house. This Bunkie is clad in wood reclaimed from a barn. A patio extends outwards, enabling the client to exercise outdoors when weather permits.
main elevation
exterior details: brick and wood slats
Entrance side view surrounded by landscapes and lake
Oisterwijk Brouwhuis was designed by Bedaux de Brouwer Architecten and its finished structure resembles an elongated barn in the forests of Oisterwijk. The pitched roof makes way for a window wall that covers one entire end of cabin. The exterior is clad in black-stained wood, which matches the wooded forest and contrasts with the snow.
West Facade
The structure is divided into two solid vertical volumes connected by glazed living areas. The cedar cladding and steel panels reflect the hues of the surrounding forest.
Architect Paolo Caravello of Helsinki-based practice Void created this prism-shaped house near a lake in Sysmä, Finland, with a glass-topped pyramidal roof that transformed the top level of the house into a fully glazed observatory where its owners can look out to stunning views of the nature outdoors.
The front deck, invisible from the road, is an extension of the wood paneling in the main living space.
Architect Bruno Despierre built a deck for outdoor activities from pine wood.
The cantilevered sleeping loft posed a structural challenge. "The structure is simple, however we explored a number of options for supporting the cantilevered loft," Eerkes says. "But after comparing costs for large trusses versus a big glulam beam—including labor costs for construction of each—the simplicity of a two-foot glulam beam won out. The steel rod cross bracing provided lateral stability in the longitudinal direction."
Says Kundig, “The clients are great parents and are always undertaking adventures as a mindful, deliberate way of developing memories as a family.”
The creekside Fish Camp prototype rests on oversize flood-rated pylons, one of many foundation options the Camp units can accommodate.
South façade
Eric Logan's guest house is adjacent to his family’s home. The interiors are made up of oiled masonite wall paneling, raw MDF cabinetry, and an oiled concrete floor.
The three-story Blue Lake Retreat is located in Marble Falls, Texas. The residence was designed by Lake Flato Architects to integrate naturally into the steep topography. With living spaces on the top floor and four bedrooms on the two lower floors, the timber structure is connected to the hillside by a bridge and boasts a cantilevered deck that floats just above the lake.
Per Bornstein’s house sits on a hill between a large forested park and Gothenburg’s former industrial area. Much of the surrounding area awaits design as thoughtful and lovely as this home built on a previously abandoned lot.
With the majority of the house's windows facing down the slope, not only does Bornstein maximize the views out, but he assured that his home would have loads of natural light pouring in, even if it only lasts for a few hours in winter.
The master-bedroom addition juts forth like a prow of a ship.
Next to an old farmhouse in the East Tyrolean village of Nussdorf, Austria, is an unusually shaped, shingle-clad cabin that's raised up on skinny steel struts.  
Set on a hilly incline and designed by architects Peter and Lukas Jungmann, the cabin appears to hover above ground like some sort of alien object—a stark contrast to its pastoral environment and the traditional Austrian chalets that surround it.  
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named
On the northwestern tip of Scotland’s Isle of Skye is a vacation rental that's inspired by the region’s traditional “crofter style” cottages, but covered with a skin of tin.  
Designed and built by Gill Smith and Alan Dickson of Scottish practice Rural Design Architects, this house sits along the rugged Isle of Skye coast and has a rudimentary form that recalls children’s drawings of pitched-roof homes.  
Smith and Dickson constructed the house using corrugated metal sheeting, which is commonly used for agricultural sheds or
Most impressive of all, a solar array on the roof empowers the residents to produce more energy than they consume on-site.
Large floor-to-ceiling windows and doors provide abundant natural light and ventilation.
The decidedly nontraditional structure includes a front wall that opens the living room onto the front yard—and to the rest of the neighborhood, which has enthusiastically welcomed the house and its owner.
In need of more room for their growing brood, Eric and Emma Gimon, with Luc, Paul, baby Louise, and their dog, Nefi, asked for a private space to accompany the house designed for Eric’s great-aunt.
A combination home and photographer’s studio, the Studio House is an exploration of memories and their potential to resonate over time. Remnant landscape elements, building geometries and materials from the previous home on the site reappear in the new building. These fragments act as artifacts that recall earlier times. The two-story living room/studio has a curved roof that serves as a large reflector for diffusing natural and artificial light. Details, such as the stairs, fireplace, light fixtures and hardware, are made of metal and reflect the owner’s interests in art and craftsmanship. Photo by Paul Warchol.
Lake House
It takes three to five days to install a Vipp Shelter onsite.
Glass Farmhouse | Olson Kundig
Girodo describes LEAPfactory’s architecture as being “molded according to the needs and stresses imposed by context.” In this setting, strong winds and snow loads are serious concerns. The shell’s composite sandwich panels and aluminum shingles ensure that the school can withstand the elements.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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