99 Living Room Medium Hardwood Floors Recessed Lighting Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

SHED replaced the windows with new wood units of the same style. Note how the shelving at the half-wall aligns perfectly with the window mullions.
"We really wanted the rest of the house to be quiet in order to showcase the shipping containers as art objects," says Davis. "So, we used a very simple materials palette: lots of big windows and doors to bring in light and open up to the yards; heated concrete floors, polished to reveal the aggregate; basic IKEA cabinets; sheetrock painted a gallery-like white; and some touches of light, natural wood to add warmth and texture."
The bright orange front door opens into the circulation space between the existing home and the new addition. The family area sits at a slightly lower level, accessed via several long timber steps.
“Often the boys use the shipping containers in ways we hadn’t even imagined—like bravely climbing on top of the containers and jumping onto the big bean bags below,” says architect Paul Michael Davis. “It’s probably not advisable—a shipping container isn’t a jungle gym—but it’s thrilling to see a space used in ways you never expected!”
Facing a COVID-19 shutdown, Taylor and Michaella McClendon recruited their family to build a breezy tiny home on the Big Island—which you can now purchase for $99,800.
"We wrapped the roof in glass, so the interior is open, airy, and gets plenty of sunlight—something many tiny homes lack," says Mackay.
A curtain can be pulled shut over the living room windows to afford privacy when needed.
"The main challenge was making a space with a 250-square-foot footprint actually feel large," says Mackay. "The key to its success is high ceilings, eight-foot doors, and oversize windows."
Looking back from the children's play area to the living room, which features a bright red credenza from IKEA and other orange accent pieces.
The living room features contemporary seating paired with mismatched accent tables from Gaggino, a vintage Harry Bertoia Bird chair, and a lobster-red credenza. Graphic art by John Pearson complements the colour scheme.
The entrance foyer encapsulates the home’s themes of reuse—through the salvaged wood and metal gate—artisan furniture, and colourful abstraction. The Moroccan wall hanging is a vintage find, and the chairs and table are by local furniture designer Seth Keller. The industrial gate has been given a domestic twist with the addition of coat hooks for the client’s young child.
The living room is anchored by a large concrete fireplace that also forms the house's robust structural system. Pops of color come from a painting by Milton Wilson.
Interior designer Nina Blair blends Ghanaian and Scandinavian influences in her family’s Tribeca apartment.
The cabin entry leads directly to a cozy living room with a fridge, a small live-edge counter, and a bar sink. Picture-frame windows are strategically placed to frame views of distant mountains.
The deck adjacent to the master bedroom in the main house has views over the ocean. The chimney flue from the ground floor fireplace cuts through the corner of the deck, making the semioutdoor space useable even in cold weather.
“We wanted to tie the living room together with a freestanding midcentury-style fireplace, which was a design collaboration between our team and Malm Fireplaces” says designer Taylor Bode. “When all of the bi-fold doors are open, you can sit in a circle around the fireplace both indoors and outdoors. It’s an integral part of the design that brings warmth and light to the corner of the house.”
The communal dining table in the main house was custom-made by a local woodworker and island timber mill owner, Joe Romano, in collaboration with WindowCraft. Raw metal supports for the table were fabricated by Salish Metalworks on Orcas Island, a sister island to San Juan.
The great room is designed for indoor/outdoor living. The floor-to-ceiling glass wall at the back of the space (which is just a slice of the all-glass rear) includes a bi-fold NanaWall door system that opens the home to an outdoor terrace and the lush surroundings.
The two living rooms at the front of the home sit on slightly different levels. The more formal living room features a linen sofa by Pure Interiors and classic CH22 and CH26 timber chairs by Hans J. Wegner for Carl Hansen & Son.
The casual living room on the ground floor features a vintage cane chair, a Togo sofa by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset, and a portrait titled Matriarch by contemporary Danish artist Henrik Godsk.
A reading nook in the living room makes use of otherwise dead space and offers additional storage.
A “cathedral” roof above the open-plan living area creates a sense of volume in the small space. The storage is all contained in carefully planned bespoke joinery units.
The built-in timber storage units in the living room feature the same concrete top as the kitchen bench and the desk in the study nook. The rawness of the concrete contrasts with the refined oak timber joinery and minimal white walls.
A timber display positioned below the porthole window in the living space offers a lookout for the owner’s cat.
The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
The entry between the living room and dining room was widened.
A coat of Dunn Edwards "Frosting Cream" brightens up the surroundings significantly.
Rossi kept important features of the old home throughout, such as the built-ins, fireplace, and original floors.
Solid timber windows add warmth to every room. The solid timber flooring in the living/dining area provides additional character.
Two dividing orange bulkheads—which are the box gutters that protrudes through the house—separate the three pavilions. The family congregates in the central pavilion for meals around the dining table, and to relax in the lounge.
As an homage to the original owners and their art collection, Will and Mark commissioned a digital work by Chicago-based artist duo Luftwerk that can be projected onto the large wall in the living area.
The materials used in the house—concrete blocks and oak floors—are modest, and the detailing is very simple and often workmanlike. The white concrete block walls were repainted in Benjamin Moore’s Chantilly Lace during the renovation.
The open floor plan highlights the dichotomy between the two halves of the site: ribbon windows screen the view of the street opposite picture windows that frame the treetops and lake.
Boiserie panels made of zebrawood create a cozy nook in the main living area and also form a picture rail to display the client’s art collection.
Preda elegantly reallocated the space to contain a side-by-side living room and dining room area, with the latter defined by a custom Cor-Ten steel and zebrawood bookcase designed by the firm. The dining table is by Alepreda for miduny, the firm’s sister furniture company. The fireplace is an ethanol model, since incorporating a chimney wasn’t possible in the building.
The upper penthouse provides stunning city views from a terrace that extends off the living room.
This living room features a custom sofa and leather, brass, and hardwood armchairs by Atra Form. A cluster of coffee tables includes the Paloma painted steel coffee table designed by Pedro Ramirez Vazquez, a custom brushed brass side table by Atra Form, and the Telugu Suar stained wood side table by NAMUH.
Shalina Kell is a graphic designer and a maker—and now she can add "tiny home builder" to her resume. The single mom lives with her teenage daughter in a lovely, light-filled, 350-square-foot tiny home in Sacramento that she built and designed herself.
The living room has reflected sofas and plenty of shelves for the library of books
The bright pink and leopard print furnishings are reminiscent of Betsey's clothing line.
The house’s original asymmetry remains pronounced in the remodel. The custom island, over 11 feet long and made of fir with leather panel inlays trimmed with patina steel, was designed by Carolyn Woofter, and works to separate the living area from the enlarged dining area, which can now seat 16 people for dinner. The Cornogs commissioned the carving between the windows. It’s by Monica Setziol-Phillips, Leroy Setziol’s daughter.
The open floor plan features a whitewashed interior, beamed wood ceilings, splashes of hardwood, and a freestanding vintage fire drum fireplace sourced by Wilson’s wife Coco.
Saddle Peak Residence by AUX Architecture
A view of the living room and kitchen.
Beside one of the building's original stained-glass windows, a handmade "church banner" by Shelby Rodeffer pays homage to Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, and Tammy Wynette.
The 1894 Queen Anne Victorian features an open floor plan that juxtaposes classic original features with cool modern elements—many of which are customized for the home.
A cozy, library-like reading area lies just off the dining area. The wood-burning fireplace has a gas starter.
Full-height French doors lead from the den to the pool area.
At the end of the hall, a landing overlooks the living room, which has access to the backyard. The stairway leads up to the third floor, which has a bedroom and bonus office.
Inside, the 4,043-square-foot property features reclaimed wood floors and beamed ceilings.
The kitchen overlooks an additional sitting area and a home office separated by glass doors.
The extra 14-inch ceiling height brings light and harbor views into the space, while transom windows add a bonus sky view.
Fotsch reframed the great room, adding 14
Subtle curves introduced throughout the design, such as in the built-in casework and stone plinth, soften the geometric plan of the home.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.