431 Living Room Recessed Lighting Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

Floor-to-ceiling glass melds the tiny building with its surroundings, while nine-foot-tall ceilings give it a spacious feel.
SHED replaced the windows with new wood units of the same style. Note how the shelving at the half-wall aligns perfectly with the window mullions.
The rosy, matte pink of the kitchen cabinets bleeds into the living room of this playful apartment in Japan, but is starkly contrasted with the striped green-and-yellow floor and blue backsplash in the kitchen and furniture in the living room.
The main living area features a black pellet stove in the corner and a raw-edge, white oak window seat, which add rustic elements to the clean, bright space.
The couch swing was the last element of The House to be designed. "I wanted something comfortable and unique, but not weird," says Tarah. "In a stroke of genius, Drew suggested a couch swing." The piece was made by the couple in the garage just days before the first booking and is one of the guests’ favorite features.
The living area is oriented around a floating window seat crafted from oak. "We wanted a place for guests to comfortably sit, read, and reflect in the beautiful Colorado surroundings," says Tarah. "We sourced the perfect slab of white oak from a local mill. We kept the edges raw and used a light, matte finish that highlighted the natural beauty without it being over saturated. I wanted it to feel as unfinished and natural as possible."
The fireplace was painted white and now has a wood stove installed (not shown). "Once we got the wood stove, the room just came to life and became super cozy," says Jocie.
The mezzanine level hosts the bedrooms and overlooks the lower living spaces.
Floor-to-ceiling glass doors that stretch 27 feet long connect the interior to the side patio.
The custom steelwork seen throughout the home was all done by Identity Construction, including the bar in the loft space that overlooks the living area.
There are a variety of living areas, allowing the family to come together or inhabit different spaces. The den has a piano where the children can indulge in their passion for music.
The most costly parts of the build were the board-formed concrete walls and fireplace. “We believe it was worth spending the money here for a few reasons,” reveals architect Cavin Costello. “The mass anchors the house into the landscape, and the material is incredibly durable—something we need in the harsh desert sun. The board-forms give the home a wonderful character.”
Crawford taught himself how to reface the brick fireplace façade, using a creamy-colored, thin set brick. “It was his first time using a tile saw or laying brick, but his meticulous precision paid off,” says Devlin.
The wood slat wall was a great solution for spreading light throughout the split-level and looks right for the era of the house. At $2700, it was also much more cost effective than Devlin’s original design of a metal staircase.
The living space features glazed walls that look out over the garage and through the warehouse-style space toward the library. The couple’s collection of objets d’art are displayed on built-in shelves throughout the home, such as this one that wraps around a fireplace.
An eclectic collection of artwork, objects, and furniture adds warmth to the interior and evokes a real sense of the couple’s personalities. The layering of these objects over the industrial architecture creates a texturally rich interior that can be read as a tapestry of the couple's life together.
An aqua Malm fireplace warms up a corner. The pink, green, and yellow stripes now reach the skylights and extend over an integrated storage space to the floor. “My husband and I, we both actually hate having a TV visible to guests, but it’s a necessary evil,” says Shawn. “So how do you make that interesting and without it being too busy? [The rainbow stripe] creates an element that draws your eye away.”
A relaxed living room with outdoor access occupies the addition.
With reclaimed materials and an open, airy design, Casa Iporanga by architect Daniel Fromer melds with its verdant surroundings.
Den
"We really wanted the rest of the house to be quiet in order to showcase the shipping containers as art objects," says Davis. "So, we used a very simple materials palette: lots of big windows and doors to bring in light and open up to the yards; heated concrete floors, polished to reveal the aggregate; basic IKEA cabinets; sheetrock painted a gallery-like white; and some touches of light, natural wood to add warmth and texture."
The bright orange front door opens into the circulation space between the existing home and the new addition. The family area sits at a slightly lower level, accessed via several long timber steps.
“Often the boys use the shipping containers in ways we hadn’t even imagined—like bravely climbing on top of the containers and jumping onto the big bean bags below,” says architect Paul Michael Davis. “It’s probably not advisable—a shipping container isn’t a jungle gym—but it’s thrilling to see a space used in ways you never expected!”
The guesthouse features a small lounge area in front of a bunk room and master bedroom. Paris Peak is visible in the distance through the side window.
The freestanding hearth serves multiple functions—it’s a fireplace, a privacy screen to the master bedroom, an entry closet, and an art piece. “The cantilevered structure is meticulously clad in raw industrial, hot-rolled steel sheets,” says architect Hunter Gundersen. “There is no glass, so the fire is open on all three sides. Like ballet, it looks easy and effortless, but in reality it’s a labor of painstaking love.” The gas burner and steel substructure was fabricated and installed by yNot construction, and the metal cladding artwork was crafted by Parker Cook Design.
The family is very creative—the artwork throughout the home was created by the client’s children, and his wife is a designer who selected and placed all the interior furnishings. The interior walls were left white to act as a gallery for the owners’ extensive art collection. In order to give the spaces warmth and coziness, the ceiling was clad in Atlantic white cedar from reSAWN Timber Co.
The entry to the home leads directly to the main living space. A 25-foot-wide, 11-foot-tall sliding glass wall opens to the central courtyard, allowing the living area to extend outside. Through this glazed door, the guesthouse and garage frame Paris Peak in the distance.
Facing a COVID-19 shutdown, Taylor and Michaella McClendon recruited their family to build a breezy tiny home on the Big Island—which you can now purchase for $99,800.
"We wrapped the roof in glass, so the interior is open, airy, and gets plenty of sunlight—something many tiny homes lack," says Mackay.
A curtain can be pulled shut over the living room windows to afford privacy when needed.
"The main challenge was making a space with a 250-square-foot footprint actually feel large," says Mackay. "The key to its success is high ceilings, eight-foot doors, and oversize windows."
The clients both work from home in the office space, which opens out into the backyard and is located in the more private rear of the home. The entire space can be closed off by a door in the hallway to provide added privacy and acoustic isolation. “They work outside in the summer,” says architect Trevor Wallace. “The backyard is an oasis—it goes up a ravine and there's tonnes of trees and it's really quiet.”
Looking back from the children's play area to the living room, which features a bright red credenza from IKEA and other orange accent pieces.
The living room features contemporary seating paired with mismatched accent tables from Gaggino, a vintage Harry Bertoia Bird chair, and a lobster-red credenza. Graphic art by John Pearson complements the colour scheme.
The entrance foyer encapsulates the home’s themes of reuse—through the salvaged wood and metal gate—artisan furniture, and colourful abstraction. The Moroccan wall hanging is a vintage find, and the chairs and table are by local furniture designer Seth Keller. The industrial gate has been given a domestic twist with the addition of coat hooks for the client’s young child.
The walls behind the fireplace are 400-millimeter-thick rammed earth, and they were formed on site by a specialist contractor. The material not only provides thermal mass to protect the interior from the heavy heat load experienced in summer, but also heats up when the fireplace is in use in winter months to provide gentle heat release to the main living area.
“There is something inherently playful about sitting on a deep window ledge with a book,” says architect Kirsten Johnstone. “Throughout the home, the juxtaposition of public versus private spaces and exposure versus protection is explored in different ways. In the lounge retreat, the large corner window abuts the hidden front entry door, and the stepped-down room means this bench seat is at the same level as the front entry decking. The external wall cladding wraps into the room, blurring the line between the inside and the outside and creating a delightful nook that is almost in the garden. It also provides an opportunity for engagement with neighbors and passers-by—a connection, a wave, a glimpse.”
The concrete hearth at the fireplace has angled sidewalls and a bevelled edge.
The rear wall with stacking sliding doors opens to surrounding decks and the "hero" view.
The living room sits at the rear of the house, connected to the garden. "Even though it's a very small house, we wanted the living room to be very generous," says the couple. "This room is the life of the house."
“My mom really wanted a fireplace, even though they don’t make sense in Texas and generally are an energy drain—and she wanted it to somehow serve the living, kitchen, and dining spaces,” says architect Ryan Bollom. “So, we wound up using a clean-burning fireplace insert designed to fit in the transition that distinguishes each of the spaces without making them feel like different rooms.”
The living, kitchen, and outdoor porch areas in the primary residence are situated to enjoy sunset. The living room opens directly to the screened outdoor dining porch and a timber deck that overlooks the surrounding hills.
The interior of the bubblewrap addition.
Floor-to-ceiling shelves and storage bookend a cabinet that conceals the television.
The home’s interior is a fusion of glass and reclaimed redwood, the latter sourced from a nearby decommissioned airplane hangar.
The pair replaced the cluttered firewood storage with a floating hearth that can double as a seat and display for art.
Raj and Watts extended the fireplace column to the ceiling to highlight the room’s expansive scale, and had it coated in concrete plaster. It was important to retain the wood-burning fireplace—a rarity in the city—but “we wanted to re-clad it in a material that also spoke to the industrial past of the building,” says Raj.
The living room is anchored by a large concrete fireplace that also forms the house's robust structural system. Pops of color come from a painting by Milton Wilson.
Timber has been used for both internal and external cladding, joinery, furniture, and door handles throughout the home. The entry nook features built-in display storage with brass detailing, which is echoed in the kitchen counter.
Interior designer Nina Blair blends Ghanaian and Scandinavian influences in her family’s Tribeca apartment.
Throughout the home, floor-to-ceiling windows and doors frame views and allow for indoor/outdoor living.
The high, angled ceiling and full-height windows provide perspective on the natural surroundings.
The event center is illuminated by large skylights overhead. The space opens to an outdoor deck. The design is a mix of store-bought and vintage with kilim rugs and woven baskets hung as wall art "to add a cozy factor and texture to the concrete and wood space," says Morgan.
The Kamp Haus cabin interiors are minimalist with large windows that take advantage of the views.
The family room couch is tucked into a nook to create a cozy retreat that still has views past the atrium to the backyard and kitchen.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.