447 Living Room Medium Hardwood Floors Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

SHED replaced the windows with new wood units of the same style. Note how the shelving at the half-wall aligns perfectly with the window mullions.
A custom leather sofa lifts to reveal battery storage. The custom maple cabinetry is stained and painted in Benjamin Moore’s Swiss Coffee.
The farmhouse-inspired interior features cozy textiles and a light and airy color palette.
Double-height ceilings mark the living area, where large windows harness plenty of natural light.
Sean Brown’s Toronto apartment is stacked with a collection of nostalgic magazines from the 90s and early 2000s, coordinating with his viral CD rugs.
GreenSpur and McAllister Architects imagined a cabin sided with Cor-Ten steel, glass and shou sugi ban cedar for a wooded property outside of Washington DC. The interior of the cabin maintains a minimalist aesthetic so that the lush landscape is the main focus. The concrete floors are stained a medium-brown tone, the ceiling features tongue-and-groove clear pine with a pickled finish, and the walls are sided with grouted cement board.
Birch plywood floating cabinets line the wall, carving out room for a painting that commands the dining room. The rest of the decor is quiet with subtle pops of greenery to echo the striking piece.
"We really wanted the rest of the house to be quiet in order to showcase the shipping containers as art objects," says Davis. "So, we used a very simple materials palette: lots of big windows and doors to bring in light and open up to the yards; heated concrete floors, polished to reveal the aggregate; basic IKEA cabinets; sheetrock painted a gallery-like white; and some touches of light, natural wood to add warmth and texture."
The bright orange front door opens into the circulation space between the existing home and the new addition. The family area sits at a slightly lower level, accessed via several long timber steps.
“Often the boys use the shipping containers in ways we hadn’t even imagined—like bravely climbing on top of the containers and jumping onto the big bean bags below,” says architect Paul Michael Davis. “It’s probably not advisable—a shipping container isn’t a jungle gym—but it’s thrilling to see a space used in ways you never expected!”
Facing a COVID-19 shutdown, Taylor and Michaella McClendon recruited their family to build a breezy tiny home on the Big Island—which you can now purchase for $99,800.
"We wrapped the roof in glass, so the interior is open, airy, and gets plenty of sunlight—something many tiny homes lack," says Mackay.
A curtain can be pulled shut over the living room windows to afford privacy when needed.
"The main challenge was making a space with a 250-square-foot footprint actually feel large," says Mackay. "The key to its success is high ceilings, eight-foot doors, and oversize windows."
“We wanted the cat element to be subtle, something you’d never know was there until you saw the cats moving through the space,
The low-slung sofa, from Medley, is non-toxic—like almost all of the furnishings here. The kitchen, too, is built from non-toxic materials. “You could actually eat the stain we used for the floors,” says Christina. No- or low-VOC stains and sealers were used throughout, and the spray-foam insulation in the walls is also low-VOC.
The Regency fireplace is from the local building center, where all the materials and fixtures were sourced to accommodate the challenges of building in a remote area. “It’s not a fancy Scandinavian model or anything,” says architect Tom Knezic. “It was about finding something that didn’t look old-fashioned at the local building center.”
Delta Land plans to create a future alpine settlement with Passive House–certified homes just like the SOLO house.
Hickory flooring stretches throughout the house.
In the living room, the trim was painted in Backdrop’s ‘Dark Arts’ in semi-gloss sheen. The Gwyneth Boucle chairs are from the goop x CB2 collection, and chosen because they allow the occupant to swivel and face the dining room. Having a toddler means “picking out furniture is tricky because no sharp edges,” says Natalie. “You can see that all my coffee tables move around, and there are no 90-degree angles, which is a rule when you have kids.”
Looking back from the children's play area to the living room, which features a bright red credenza from IKEA and other orange accent pieces.
The living room features contemporary seating paired with mismatched accent tables from Gaggino, a vintage Harry Bertoia Bird chair, and a lobster-red credenza. Graphic art by John Pearson complements the colour scheme.
The entrance foyer encapsulates the home’s themes of reuse—through the salvaged wood and metal gate—artisan furniture, and colourful abstraction. The Moroccan wall hanging is a vintage find, and the chairs and table are by local furniture designer Seth Keller. The industrial gate has been given a domestic twist with the addition of coat hooks for the client’s young child.
Canadian Castaway features a simple and rustic aesthetic with a focus on raw materials. "I didn’t want to paint the wood white, for instance," the owner says. "I just wanted to let it age naturally and invite it to mirror the natural world it's now a part of."
Clark & Chapin Architects, Buffaloe House, Living Room Fireplace
Clark & Chapin Architects, Buffaloe House, Living Room Fireplace
With a record playing in the background, gaze at bluestone boulders from the couch, then revive with a coffee made in the marble counter-topped galley kitchen at this post and beam saltbox cabin in Bearsville. It embraces an open-plan, loft-living layout, but contemplative moments abound—at the writing nook, on the glassed-in porch or sprawling deck, and in the beds enveloped by canvas "walls." Reward visits to Cooper Lake and the Mink Hollow hiking trail with a snooze on the central hammock, a Noguchi light fixture above.
Beyond its sliding doors, this storybook barn in Gallatin is airy and filled with natural light, courtesy of old, quirky window sashes. Original wood from the vast, open structure—privacy awaits in the reading nook—has been re-imagined and bolstered by throw rugs and glamorous chandeliers. With views onto the pastoral meadow, alfresco grilling feasts around the deck’s hand-made black locust table are bound to become a nightly occurrence.
A Pampa rug from Argentina adorns this light-filled living room designed by Cortney Bishop.
Designer Cortney Bishop used antique Serapi rugs—a type of Persian carpet—that she sourced from a local dealer to guide the design of this residence in Knoxville, Tennessee.
The small window has been replaced with a large glazed door, and the original fireplace has been restored and reinstated.
The living room is anchored by a large concrete fireplace that also forms the house's robust structural system. Pops of color come from a painting by Milton Wilson.
The bedroom/living space is enclosed by large glass windows framing the treescape. “I think one of the most successful experiential aspects of a building is how intimately involved it is with the site,” says architect Ant Vervoort. “An expensive view has the effect of divorcing one from the site. In House of the Tall Chimneys, the views are very close and intimate, which makes you part of the site.” The timber used throughout is Eucalyptus saligna, which is native to Australia and sustainably grown and harvested in South Africa.
In the richly hued living room, a Milo Baughman coffee table with a chrome base and custom marble top pairs with Milo Baughman barrel chairs that have been reupholstered in a saturated blue fabric. A custom velvet sofa adds another textured layer. A custom light fixture with crystal bulbs from The Future Perfect hangs like jewelry above the space, and a geometric painting by senior JHID designer Chelsie Lee ties the colors together.
Skylights throw pink and yellow tones across the 850-square-foot unit’s stepped ceilings. “With small spaces, we try to play with clerestory windows, skylights, and ceilings. It makes the architecture feel spacious, almost as though it’s levitating.”
Interior designer Nina Blair blends Ghanaian and Scandinavian influences in her family’s Tribeca apartment.
In Austin’s coveted Bouldin Creek neighborhood, Rhode Partners has converted a Mission Revival–style church into four two-story, loft-style homes that enjoy 15-foot ceilings and historic details.
"In our living room, we have a fairly large abstract piece from Sally King Benedict that was gifted from her years ago," says Amanda.
In the living room: the theatrical heavy curtain is made of Grazia and co Feel acoustic drapery. The furnishings are also by Grazia and co and include the HARVEY curved arm sofa, HARVEY armchair and IVY coffee table.
“Small but flexible spaces define the interiors," note the architects. The living room doubles as a music room and elevated stage for the three children (ages 8, 10 and 14) to put on a "home show." The hanging stair serves as a the "perfect 'back of house' grand entrance."
Removing the hallway created room for a cozy family room upstairs. The family is enjoying the nesting process since the remodel was completed in 2017. "We are raising our kid here, learning how to cook, and I even started to do a lot of working from home here even before the pandemic," says Martin. "We hop from one place to the other, making minor changes and making them our favorite for some time. We spent lots of nights here."
Martin designed the sofa with a local fabrication studio called Helmut.
The wood flooring is the original 1930 slavonia oak, rescued and refinished.
Now, the kitchen takes precedence in the new scheme. The six-meter-long island "has a strong energy," says Martin. "It was inspired by Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey monolith depicted in the first and final scenes. A fallen monolith with centripetal force. The piece helped us to reorganize and restructure the ground floor once we cleared the walls and divisions."
The cabin entry leads directly to a cozy living room with a fridge, a small live-edge counter, and a bar sink. Picture-frame windows are strategically placed to frame views of distant mountains.
The deck adjacent to the master bedroom in the main house has views over the ocean. The chimney flue from the ground floor fireplace cuts through the corner of the deck, making the semioutdoor space useable even in cold weather.
“We wanted to tie the living room together with a freestanding midcentury-style fireplace, which was a design collaboration between our team and Malm Fireplaces” says designer Taylor Bode. “When all of the bi-fold doors are open, you can sit in a circle around the fireplace both indoors and outdoors. It’s an integral part of the design that brings warmth and light to the corner of the house.”
The communal dining table in the main house was custom-made by a local woodworker and island timber mill owner, Joe Romano, in collaboration with WindowCraft. Raw metal supports for the table were fabricated by Salish Metalworks on Orcas Island, a sister island to San Juan.
The living room has a long, built-in couch with a custom midcentury-inspired fireplace. Polished concrete floors in the interior contrast with the outdoor timber decking.
New flooring—oak with a walnut stain—connects the living spaces throughout.
Built-in shelving in the ground-floor living area provides ample storage for books and records. “This is my favourite chair, where I like to sit and watch the fire or read a book,” says the owner.
A hammock chair in the living room overlooks the wood stove at the center and the sofa against the west wall, creating a cozy living space.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.