465 Exterior Tiny Home Design Photos And Ideas - Page 5

Comprised of a 26' x 8.5' by 8.5 foot wide trailer, this tiny home RV is ready for the road.
Architect Jesse Garlick’s rural Washington vacation home references its rugged surroundings. The steel cladding has developed a patina similar to the ochre-red color of bedrock found in the area.
This young family of four has fully embraced life on the road with their newly revamped skoolie.
FLEXSE measures in at 328 square feet, with an oval footprint that maximizes floorspace, according to the designers.
To optimize versatility, “the structure can be positioned on different foundations—concrete slab, metal piers, etc., which allows for placing it in the most remote areas, even on water,” says the firm.
Kitty Mrache stands in front of the Mushroom Dome Cabin, which continues to hold the title as Airbnb's most popular rental, as confirmed in Airbnb's press release celebrating the company's milestone for half a billion guest arrivals.
Wild bush, sand dunes, and scrub surrounds the circular home. The architects were careful to minimize the building impact on the fragile landscape.
EXTERIOR DRIVER SIDE
The silvertop ash shiplap boards that clad the home will develop a patina over time.
Much was done so as not to disrupt the natural rock formations and surrounding forest when siting and building the cabins.
"We avoided complex or exaggerated designs and selected three basic geometric forms," say the architects. Extensive site surveys enabled them to choose the best placement for the cabins on the hillside, and the best shape for each spot.
"Unlike other rural areas, the village of Tuanjie has little traditional architecture to hold onto," says the firm. "Instead, the striking landscapes and pollution-free farmlands are the village’s greatest assets."
Witzling and Underwood stepping out of the truck cabin.
A view of the exterior from their walk path.
The octagon cabin that they call home.
The house measures 20' x 7'.
Vertical blue-painted steel siding and horizontal cedar planks clad the exterior.
Parked in Henderson, Nevada, just outside of Las Vegas, the Blue Baloo tiny house currently serves as an AirBnB rental.
The KODA Concrete is Kodasema's classic model, with 282 square feet of space and concrete exterior panels.
Hexagonal and pentagonal panels come together to form this cabin’s oblong envelope. The unique architectural skin mimics the rock formations that surround it.
The Ecocapsule is completely self-sufficient. It can be used as a cottage, pop-up hotel, caravan, mobile office, or research station.
The Blob's nose can be opened automatically, and it functions as a little porch.
This egg-shaped sauna represents rebirth, as the city of Kiruna seeks a new beginning.
Based in New York City, Cocoon9 takes a unique approach to prefab homes, offering a line of tiny homes with high-quality construction and finishes, smart technology, energy efficiencies, and versatile spaces that are ready for the modern market.
The home's modular design is composed of an outer shell and an interior core unit that contains essential living functions, such as a bed, bathroom, and a small kitchenette.
This Beverly Hills kitHAUS is comprised of modernist prefab modules that can accommodate a variety of uses: from yoga studios to home offices, and from weekend retreats to pop-up kiosks and guest rooms.
Estonian design collective Kodasema launched this 269-square-foot micro-home, which can be built in less than a day.
At 220 square feet, The Wheel Pad's mission is to build socially-conscious, environmentally-friendly transitional housing for people newly using wheelchairs. Their universally accessible design can connect to an existing house or be accessed via an independent ramp and they offer customization options such as a composting toilet, and solar panels. Pricing starts at $60,000 with leasing available at $3,000 a month.
L.A.-based Icelandic natives Erla Dögg Ingjaldsdóttir and Tryggvi Thorsteinsson of Miniarc created the 320-square-foot Iceland-inspired tiny dwelling Plús Hús to be a sustainable and useful solution for addressing the housing shortage in their adoptive home. The Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) is prefabricated at the company's mnmMOD’s facility in downtown Los Angeles, shipped flat pack, assembled with minimal waste and can be delivered anywhere in the U.S. starting at $37,000.
The KODA Light's exterior is typically clad in wood, although there are different siding options that distinguish it from the original KODA's concrete panels.
Energy-efficient LED lighting and a rainwater collection system round out the home's sustainable features.
The San Juan Mountains and the environment inspired many design elements of the aptly named San Juan Tiny House. The undulating roof line, for example, recalls a flowing river, while the blue gradient on the back wall recreates the shifting blues of the Colorado sky. "The sun-ray pattern pays homage to the Colorado sun—we have 300+ days of sunshine per year—and the portholes mimic the stars in the desert sky," says Greg.
ICON's 3D-printed home is both a proof of concept, as well as an expression of 3D printing's capabilities to execute curved, unique designs.
Wood-framed windows sit within the home's 3D-printed walls. ICON expects its proprietary mortar to have the same durability as traditional concrete masonry (if not better).
Tongue-and-groove cedar siding clads the exterior. The windows are by Alpine.
Set on a quarter-acre pasture rented from a family friend in Maui, the tiny house operates entirely off grid with electricity, water, and sewer needs handled on-site.
The 301-square-foot cabin is situated on 99 acres on Bruny Island, an island off the coast of Tasmania. For the exterior, the architects have chosen materials that "comply with the Bushfire Attack Level of 19," they explain, including bushfire resistant wood and zincalume metal. The cabin collects its own rainwater—storage tanks are underground for an uncluttered look—and the roof sports solar panels.
Utility equipment and storage is hidden in the hexagonal "systems ring" below the living space modules.
The dwelling is raised on three marine-grade, aluminum-alloy flotation tubes, each with five sealed compartments for extra safety.
Designed for an artist and entrepreneur client, this guest house features lots of light, access to the outdoors, and an industrial vibe.
Italian prefab company LEAPfactory built this alpine shelter off-site and had it flown in via helicopter. Cantilevered off the edge of a mountain, the structure features a living room, a dine-in kitchen, bunk beds, storage closets, and an integrated computer to keep mountaineers and climbers up-to-date on the weather conditions.
Located at 9,459 feet in elevation and run by the Swiss Alpine Club, the Monte Rosa Hut has been a popular destination at the Gorner Glacier since 2009. Designed by Bearth & Deplazes Architekten and dubbed the “rock crystal” because of its striking, ultra-modern design, the innovative structure is also virtually self-sufficient.
Designed by Giovanni Pesamosca Architetto, this shelter in the Italian Alps fits nine beds within its triangular A-frame structure. Situated along the Ceria-Merlone trail at an altitude of 8,303 meters, the shelter is a memorial to Luca Vuerich, a well-known mountain guide who was killed by an avalanche while climbing an iced waterfall in the mountains near Tarvisio.
Skylodge Adventure Suites are luxury dwellings affixed to the mountainside in Peru's Sacred Valley, approximately nine miles north of Cusco. Visitors interested in staying at Skylodge must climb a quarter of a mile of protected trails and fly through the sky on zip lines.
The Gouter Refuge is located at 12,582 feet in elevation (about 3,280 feet below the summit of Mont Blanc) along the Gouter route. The four-story, rounded structure juts out over a 4,921-foot drop, and it's the last stop before the final climb to the summit of Mont Blanc. Commissioned by the French Alpine Club and designed by Swiss architect Hervé Dessimoz, the wooden structure is clad in stainless steel and took five years to design and three years to build.
Designed by OFIS Arhitekti, the Kanin Winter Cabin is a compact wooden volume with three platforms extending out over the valley. A large, glazed panoramic window provides breathtaking views of the surrounding Kanin Mountains.
Honomobo's HO4+ model is created out of four 40-foot shipping containers for a home that is not double wide but rather quadruple wide. In the 1,224 square feet of the home, owners can choose between a two-bedroom or three-bedroom option.
The interior walls, shelves and other fixtures were built using 19mm CLT and have been left with their natural spruce finish that will turn golden with exposure to the daylight.
Designed by AKT II, Harvard GSD Students, and OFIS Architects in 2015, this bivouac in Slovenia's Skuta, the third-highest peak in the Kamnik Alps, was informed by traditional alpine structures and the challenge of building for extreme mountain weather conditions.
Italian architects Roberto Dini and Stefano Girodo designed this tiny bivouac structure in the Italian Alps to help encourage exploration of the remote location. Perched on the side of a mountain at an altitude of 10,794 feet, the structure was commissioned by the family of Luca Pasqualetti, a mountaineer who tragically passed away in the Alps. The installation was an exercise in well-planned logistics: The architects collaborated with the Italian prefab company LEAPfactory to assemble the unit in an off-site workshop, and the prefab pieces were lifted into place via helicopter and installed in a single day.
With a factory in Estonia, Koda produces a prefabricated house that arrives on-site as a single unit via a trailer. Their units, which typically feature a lofted space in the back of the module, can be combined for larger homes, or simply used as offices and smaller residences. Once the module has been transported to the site, installation can be as quick as a single day, as long as the required site work has been completed.
The smallest DublDom model, the DD 26, is a compact, 280-square-foot studio with a cozy bathroom with heated floors.
Wedge by Wheelhaus
Shalina Kell with her daughter.
The Hammerfest Cabin is perched high atop a rocky slope.
The small cabin's cross-laminated timber (CLT) shell, composed of 72 unique wooden panels, is designed to withstand severe arctic storms and heavy wind conditions.
While perched at the peak of the mountain, adventurous travelers are rewarded with unparalleled views of the region's breathtaking natural scenery.
“We are delighted to see that our ambition to create this innovative sanctuary for adventurers has been realized,” says James Dodson of SPINN Architects. “We hope that the cabin will continue to be enjoyed and will encourage more people to visit the stunning location in the future.”
The Hammerfest Cabin is the first of several concept cabins in an innovative series. The second cabin, planned for late 2019, will be built on Tyven—a mountain on the other side of Hammerfest.
The overall construction cost of the Hammerfest Cabin was about €100,000, including many hours of volunteer work.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.