67 Exterior Tiny Home Glass Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Expansive glass walls were paired with a Corten Steel frame to maximize the yard's garden views.
In the corner, framed, machine-sewn vintage fabrics serve as minimalist wall decor. The artwork is the creation of delavegacanolasso and is available for sale on the firm's website.
The interiors are lined with OSB Poplar wood, and insulated with 12cm of recycled cotton.
Architects Delavegacanolasso expand a client’s work-from-home office space by adding a Cor-Ten steel prefab to the backyard.
Casa Parasito effortlessly provides accommodations for two people in a cleverly unique location: the rooftop of a city building in San Juan, Ecuador. El Sindicato Arquitectura wanted to not only provide a home, but also contribute positively to the densification challenge that the city’s inhabitants face. The design concept hinges on an A-frame facade. Within, an interior layout is marked by a rectangular core—also the main social/living space—from which all other utilitarian spaces, such as the kitchen, dining area, bathroom, bed, work area, and storage are accessed.
"Some of my favorite elements are the reclaimed Wyoming fence wood siding and cedar tongue and groove ceilings," reveals Mackay. "The use of reclaimed wood is pretty unique."
"At Wheelhaus, our priorities are durability, efficient use of space, and sustainability—and we provide all of that along with modern and innovative design," says Mackay. "We focus on energy efficiency, progressive space management, and top-of-the-line building materials."
The outdoor deck seamlessly extends out from the living room, allowing residents to expand the living space outdoors in warmer months. The canopy protects the deck from sun and rain.
Road-Haus can be placed nearly anywhere recreational vehicles or trailers can. "To install Road-Haus, you will need a water line, sewer connection line, and 100 amp service for power within 20 feet of the unit," says Wheelhaus founder Jamie Mackay.
The exterior of Site Shack is covered in steel panels that are bolted to the framing. Look closely and you won’t see any visible fasteners, as Powers Construction’s welder was fastidious, creating a seamless shell with just steel and glass.
Measuring only 180 square feet, this exquisite, off-grid tiny home features a big sense of style.
"We imagined how six people would use the space and developed the shape accordingly," says Hello Wood cofounder Dávid Ráday. "We took inspiration from the design of space capsules, and the cabin was refined step by step before reaching its final form."
Special attention was paid to how the panels fit together to ensure the cabin is watertight and can cope with both cold winters and warm summers. The shape of the panels has been optimized to create minimal waste when cutting the material. “It was a very long, but very rewarding process,” says Hello Wood co-founder Dávid Ráday.
The Workstation Cabin was designed using CAD, and the elements are precision cut using a CNC machine. The pod is delivered fully assembled and lifted onto the site using a crane, so installation takes only a few days. Sitting on small stilts—that are attached to ground screws—the cabin almost appears to have touched down from outer space.
The cabin can also be used as a cozy private lounge space, away from a main house. Although the space is small, large windows and a glass door allow the cabin to visually connect to the surrounding landscape, making it feel larger than its 91-square-foot interior.
The Workstation Cabin’s frame structure is composed of wooden sandwich panels, and it’s clad in weatherproof timber. Depending on client wishes, the cabins can also be built using composite, aluminum, or COR-TEN steel cladding.
The design team wanted to create a cabin that felt connected to nature, both in the exterior and interior. The organic form sits easily in the landscape, while large windows invite garden views inside.
Both ÖÖD Iceland houses have a hot tub at the front overlooking the spectacular scenery. “This makes the experience even more surreal,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The glass front half of the cabin blurs boundaries between interior and exterior and completely immerses guests in the dramatic surroundings.
The cabins overlook the Hekla volcano, one of Iceland’s most active volcanoes. It is part of a 25-mile-long volcanic ridge, and during the Middle Ages it was referred to by Europeans as the "Gateway to Hell.”
The two cabins are named Freya and Alva, and feature the runes for “F” and “A” on the exterior timber wall. Signs from Nordic mythology are also found on the back of the houses. “The viking elements and the runes help the cabins fit into Icelandic history,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The harsh local climate—including strong winds and acid rain caused by the volcanic landscape—was a particular challenge. The cabin features a copper roof, which is one of the few materials that can cope with acid rain.
The gable decoration is a Viking element traditionally used to protect homes from danger. The “moon” shape comes from the shape of Viking horns.
Two cabins sit in the vast, empty landscape overlooking the Hekla volcano, around three hours’ drive from Reykjavík. The front part of each cabin—for sleeping—is almost entirely glass, while the rear—where the living, kitchen and bathroom spaces are located—is clad in timber for privacy.
ÖÖD offers a range of “mirror houses”—tiny prefab cabins that are often used as guest houses, countryside getaways, and Airbnb accommodations. So far they’ve built projects in 12 different countries, including Estonia, Finland, and Norway. The ÖÖD Iceland home is a bespoke design, based on the clients’ wishes and strict local building requirements. These impacted everything from the dwelling’s structural properties and energy efficiency to the pitched roof.
The mirrored box disappears into the hillside, reflecting the dense foliage.
The roughly 160-square-foot modules, dubbed Mini House 2.0, were built in collaboration with Swedish manufacturer Sommarnöjen, and are delivered flat-packed. The homes are painted wood, and include a shaded deck space, plus full insulation and electricity, for a price of about $29,000. The modules come in various layouts, and can be configured and combined to include a kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, and living space.
If you’re traveling to Puglia in Italy, one of the most iconic sights are trulli (trullo is the singular), an ancient hut that's specific to the Itria Valley in the Apulia region of Southern Italy. Made with dry stone, trulli date back to medieval times.
If you've never set foot within a shipping container home, you might imagine them to be simple rectangles with no real consideration put into design, proportion, and the division of rooms. Well, think again: these floor plans prove that shipping container homes can be efficient, sustainable, and even exciting.
Designed and built by Oakland–based O2 Treehouse, the Pinecone is a five-and-a-half-ton geodesic home that can be installed in the forest or in your own backyard. The treehouse, accessed via a wood ladder and a trap door, is constructed from steel, wood, and glass that integrates into the forest canopy. Inside, 64 diamond-shaped windows provide 360-degree views of the surrounding forest or landscape. Even the floors are composed of transparent panels—enhancing the sensation of floating above the earth.
At under 100 square feet, the 8' x 12' Site Shack includes just the essentials: a wood-burning stove, a desk, and storage.
Affordable, adorable, and in many cases, transportable, these tiny homes made a big impact on our readers this year.
This 180-square-foot cabin offers 360-degree views of the Hudson Valley.
Panorama Lodge has the tagline “Where the sky is,” which perfectly suits this 248-square-foot cabin in Iceland.
Many tiny home dwellers develop eco-friendly habits when they downsize—like adopting a capsule wardrobe, carpooling more, and harvesting rainwater.
The architects inserted skylights in an artful pattern in the rooftop.
At night, the exterior screen provides privacy when the house is illuminated.
Per the Kebony website, their wood products are composed of sustainable softwoods that have been modified with a bio-based liquid to give them the characteristics of hardwoods, making the end result hardy and durable.
An open living space greets you at the door. The exterior wood will gain a natural silver patina over time, melding with the concrete of the interior.
Completed in just six weeks by Australian practice Archiblox, this modest prefab home is perched atop cliffs with prime views of Avalon Beach, just a short drive away from Sydney. Oriented east to west to maximize cross ventilation, the house is clad in marine-grade Colorbond Ultra steel and Queensland blue gum to protect against the elements.
This Beverly Hills kitHAUS is comprised of modernist prefab modules that can accommodate a variety of uses: from yoga studios to home offices, and from weekend retreats to pop-up kiosks and guest rooms.
Estonian design collective Kodasema launched this 269-square-foot micro-home, which can be built in less than a day.
Italian prefab company LEAPfactory built this alpine shelter off-site and had it flown in via helicopter. Cantilevered off the edge of a mountain, the structure features a living room, a dine-in kitchen, bunk beds, storage closets, and an integrated computer to keep mountaineers and climbers up-to-date on the weather conditions.
Located at 9,459 feet in elevation and run by the Swiss Alpine Club, the Monte Rosa Hut has been a popular destination at the Gorner Glacier since 2009. Designed by Bearth & Deplazes Architekten and dubbed the “rock crystal” because of its striking, ultra-modern design, the innovative structure is also virtually self-sufficient.
Skylodge Adventure Suites are luxury dwellings affixed to the mountainside in Peru's Sacred Valley, approximately nine miles north of Cusco. Visitors interested in staying at Skylodge must climb a quarter of a mile of protected trails and fly through the sky on zip lines.
The Gouter Refuge is located at 12,582 feet in elevation (about 3,280 feet below the summit of Mont Blanc) along the Gouter route. The four-story, rounded structure juts out over a 4,921-foot drop, and it's the last stop before the final climb to the summit of Mont Blanc. Commissioned by the French Alpine Club and designed by Swiss architect Hervé Dessimoz, the wooden structure is clad in stainless steel and took five years to design and three years to build.
Designed by AKT II, Harvard GSD Students, and OFIS Architects in 2015, this bivouac in Slovenia's Skuta, the third-highest peak in the Kamnik Alps, was informed by traditional alpine structures and the challenge of building for extreme mountain weather conditions.
With a factory in Estonia, Koda produces a prefabricated house that arrives on-site as a single unit via a trailer. Their units, which typically feature a lofted space in the back of the module, can be combined for larger homes, or simply used as offices and smaller residences. Once the module has been transported to the site, installation can be as quick as a single day, as long as the required site work has been completed.
With its open porch with an overhung roof, clerestory windows, and high ceilings, the Roadhaus Wedge RV by Wheelhaus feels much larger and more open than its 250 square feet would suggest.
Prefabricated and stackable, Kasita's high-density units may be a solution to America’s affordable housing crisis—with tech-enabled, high-quality design to boot.
The new, semi-custom PreMade mobile units can be used in a variety of applications.
The Site Shack in a pristine natural setting in British Columbia.
Powers Construction uses the Site Shack as a space to meet with homeowners and discuss the project.
Powers Construction originally developed the compact and contemporary Site Shack as a mobile workspace for their residential job sites.
Suspended in the forest, the Pinecone tree house is a sight to behold.
Measuring only 180 square feet, this sleek, prefabricated, off-grid tiny home rotates the classic A-frame cabin structure by 45 degrees to create more usable floor space. Sited in Hudson Valley, the sleek, black cabin by BIG and prefab housing startup Klein is the first model in a series of tiny homes that Klein plans to sell directly to consumers.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.