131 Exterior House Mid Century Glass Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The home’s original footprint, circular front driveway, and original brick facade were preserved.
As the midcentury era was winding down, architect George Smart was commissioned to design a low-slung brick and glass house at 2300 Timber Lane in Houston’s River Oaks neighborhood. The home would go on to serve as the clergy house for St. Luke’s United Methodist Church for 49 years.
Located in the sylvan enclave of Innis Arden about an hour north of Seattle, this home soaks up the natural beauty of the Pacific Northwest. This beautifully maintained midcentury home was designed in 1962 by Seattle–based modernist architect Ralph D. Anderson—who was an early advocate for preservation in the region. A soaring, double-height wall of glass in the living room brings a sense of the home's forested surroundings to its interiors. Character-filled elements of the home's midcentury roots remain—including a slightly sunken living room, a circular staircase, a tongue-and-groove ceiling, wood paneling, and a kitchen countertop crafted of salvaged teak from a 1960s battleship. Updated elements include a renovated kitchen, which kept the original salvaged teak and updated appliances as needed.
When Wexler and Harrison’s steel homes first hit the market in 1962, they were competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Shown above is Steel House #2.
Originally built in 1957, this Twin Palms home was designed by William Krisel. Recently, the home was renovated with an updated kitchen and bathrooms that remain true to the residence’s midcentury character.
Built in 1949, Byrdview is one of four residential homes designed by the famed midcentury architect William Pereira, known for his futuristic designs that include the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco.
Set in the southwest hills of Portland, Oregon, this 1965 home was designed by noted local architect William Fletcher and entirely renovated in 2008. The low-lying home with a bright blue door was customized with elements that complemented the original midcentury architecture, including updates to all bathrooms, opening up the kitchen and adding cabinetry in Oregon black walnut, and transforming the car port into a dining room.
When Austin-based firm Matt Fajkus Architecture was tasked with renovating this classic midcentury home, they sought to open up the interior—not only by unifying the common areas into an open-plan layout, but also by literally raising the home's roof. This strategy increased the ceiling height on three sides of the home, allowing for the insertion of clerestory windows to create a bright and airy open living space. "The raised ceiling maintains the original pitched roof geometry to stay harmonious with the existing gabled roof in the private zone," explain the architects in a statement.
Designed to comfortably accommodate three to five employees, the 1,000-square-foot home office by Matt Fajkus Architecture complements an existing midcentury abode. The addition includes two individual office spaces, a conference room, a studio, a bathroom, and storage space. An operable wall divides the main space as needed. The wood-and-stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that jives with the existing home's midcentury style.
Wexler and Harrison's original plan was to create affordable vacation homes for a growing middle class. When this home first went on the market with the others in 1962, it was competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Today, the kitchen has been restored following guidelines from its original configuration, and the landscaping was updated in 2001 with Wexler's oversight.
Originally built in 1940, this 3,260-square-foot home has undergone a complete redesign, reimagining the property as a midcentury-inspired, contemporary estate. The renovation of the four-bedroom, five-bath residence also included the addition of an entirely new wing and landscaping including cacti and palm trees . Highlights of the home include an open indoor/outdoor floor plan, a vaulted tongue-and-groove ceiling in the great room, expansive glazing, and gorgeous desert landscaping across the 16,000-square-foot lot. The iconic home also comes with a bit of local history, as it was previously owned by Florian Boyd, the former Mayor of Palm Springs from 1953 to 1957.
The second floor houses a 900-square-foot apartment that can be kept separate from the main floor residence for rental purposes or can be connected via a door. "In what had been an attic for storing fan belts and auto supplies, we created a large open apartment with full bath and kitchen," says McCuen.
“Most homeowners would tear the whole thing down and start fresh,” says Brillhart. “But it made for a much more interesting project, preserving a little bit of Russell’s legacy and then adding two new wings on each side of the building.” An Ipe fence now lines the front of the property, and the two-story wing can be just glimpsed through the trees on the left.
Framed by floor-to-ceiling glass, the bright blue front door adds a pop of color to the facade.
The front facade features two gated deck/lounge areas—one on either side of the door.
Perched high above the river, the master bedroom overlooks the beautiful wooded backdrop.
Set on 4.3 acres of riverfront property perched dramatically above the Saugatuck River in Weston, Connecticut, the five-bedroom, three-bath Corwin House is well preserved—with only a few updates to the kitchen and baths.
Philip Johnson's Glass House is in fact one building out of 14 that sit on the 49-acre property, each with their own approach to structure, geometry, siting, and proportion.
246 East 58th Street was designed by Paul Rudolph in 1989 and is the only residence designed by Rudolph that is currently open to the public.
Designed by Arthur Witthoefft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in 1961, this five-bedroom, five-bathroom midcentury house is set in the woods of Armonk, New York. The 5,000-square-foot home features full-height walls of glass, a wraparound floating terrace, and a quiet deck that overlooks the site's sylvan surroundings.
The Eames House, also known as Case Study House #8, is on Chautauqua Drive in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles, California.
Manitoga, or Dragon Rock, was the residence of industrial designer Russel Wright and is filled with design details that incorporated nature, including rooms with boulders rising from the floors and a tiered layout that worked with the natural topography.
The home glows from within at dusk.
The post-and-beam home has a classic midcentury profile.
For an escape from bustling San Francisco, architect Craig Steely and his wife Cathy have created a modernist getaway on a lava field next to a black sand beach on Hawaii’s Big Island. Fitted with floor-to-ceiling windows that look out over the ocean, the steel-framed home is one of several homes that Steely built on the recently active lava field.
The contemporary home is a beautiful take on desert modernism.
The 5,000-square-foot midcentury home sits on 2.24 acres of woodland in Armonk, New York.
The terrace provides a quiet place to enjoy the forested surroundings.
The beautifully landscaped backyard features a lush lawn, a spacious side patio, and a large side yard with a variety of blossoming trees and flowers.
16 Kirby Lane North is rooted in midcentury-modern tradition, despite having undergone some recent additions.
The low-slung roof helps to integrate the home into its sylvan surroundings.
Fresh, bright, and cheery, the updated architecturally significant residence complements the couple’s modern lifestyle.
Wexler thought steel was a good material for desert building. He told the Los Angeles Times: “With steel you get clean, sharp lines that will look good forever. Nothing can destroy it. Nothing can affect it.”
A small sitting patio just outside the kitchen door.
The home is located in the Movie Colony East neighborhood, on land that was once part of the Frank Sinatra estate before it was subdivided.
One of the most significant of Mies' works, the Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois, was built between 1945 and 1951 for Dr. Edith Farnsworth as a weekend retreat. The home embraces his concept of a strong connection between structure and nature, and may be the fullest expression of his modernist ideals.
The guest house glows night.
The home is perched on a hill overlooking Hidden Lake.
The side approach to the home.
One of the most significant of Mies' works, the Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois, was built between 1945 and 1951 for Dr. Edith Farnsworth as a weekend retreat. The home embraces his concept of a strong connection between structure and nature, and may be the fullest expression of his modernist ideals.
The rear view of the home.
The home features a two-car garage with clerestory windows that keep the interior bright.
A long bluestone roof deck overlooks the pool and the expansive lawn.
The midcentury modern home is located on 1.7 acres of land and features bluestone terraces, fieldstone walls, and elevated views of the countryside.
Steep street. Original garage door and wooden louvers.  New third floor glass louvers.
A view of the exterior of the home.
A terrace is located just off the master suite.
In the entrance, a team with the general contracting firm Martha uncovered an abstract mural that Engels painted himself and then plastered over. He also made the geometric door handle. Simon speculates that Engels sourced the marble, found all over the house, from Expo ’58, after the pavilions had been dismantled.
Villa Engels, the home of the esteemed Belgian modernist Lucien Engels (1928–2016), was falling apart when its second owners bought it in 2013. Yet due to its heritage status, any changes they planned would have to be approved by the provincial preservation office. Engels completed the elongated, cantilevered residence in 1958, the same year he finalized the master plan for Expo ’58, the Brussels World’s Fair that famously featured the Atomium.
The residence appears to be in original condition.
According to the Los Angeles Conservancy, the house “encouraged a lively social life, with the living room serving as a focal point.”
The elegant midcentury home bears Neutra's signature style.
The historic Chuey House sits atop a ridge on Sunset Plaza Drive in the Hollywood Hills.
Richard Neutra's Iconic Chuey House
The Palm Springs Modern Committee relocated and reconstructed a full-scale replica of architect Paul Rudolph's 1952 Walker Guest House. It's currently on loan from the Sarasota Architectural Foundation.
"The main forms were wrapped in stainless steel to reflect the landscape and create a colorful, shimmering, envelope," explain the architects on their website.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.