121 Exterior House Building Type Mid Century Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

The main house channels a midcentury vibe.
The facade
The vi
Originally designed as a single story residence the home features clean lines and an indoor-outdoor connection.
Set behind a gate and up a private half-acre drive, the home enjoys expansive westward views to the ocean.
The Case Study homes were built between 1945 and 1966 and were commissioned by Arts & Architecture magazine to create inexpensive and replicable model homes to accommodate the residential housing boom in the United States caused by the flood of returning soldiers at the end of World War II.
An exterior view of the International-style home.
An arial view of the property clearly illustrates the five attached pods.
1 1954 post-and-beam midcentury home by architect David Lopez.
The entrance to the house.
Setback from the street, this extremely private one level property has sliders with outdoor access, solar panels, and mountain views from every room.
The large L-shaped estate looks out on a large pool and a luxurious outdoor entertaining area.
When contractor ABO Construction discovered that part of the original roof needed replacing, Delano came up with a butterfly design that suited the home’s midcentury lines.
At nighttime, the house glows as a mid-century modern icon.
Full height, movable glass doors provide the ultimate indoor-outdoor living experience.
A curved concrete block wall conceals one of the three exterior terraces.  Low-slung roofs appear to hover above the landscape.
The exterior of Neely and Kefalides’s house is punctuated with a bright red door.
Each of the four units has a private patio.
The pool at the bottom of the property did not exist when Mcllwee bought the house, even though Lautner had originally planned for it to be there. Mcllwee and Marmol Radziner used Lautner’s original drawings to actually build it. Better late than never.
The main living space is constructed of immense I-profiles, allowing for a full wall of glass with four large sliding doors that open to the backyard.
A guest room and office wing were added to the front of the house. This left the living room roof in tact – a key feature of the original design, and created a front courtyard that define the entry sequence as a unique experience.
The architects felt that a strong vertical addition would draw extra attention to the original house’s strong horizontal character. The tower itself is a reinterpretation of an A-frame from another Strenger house five doors down.
To install Charles Willson’s prefab house, Stillwater Dwellings lifted the structure over an existing barn on the one-acre property. Willson, who is often on the road, wired the house with the latest in smart technology.
The previous residents sheathed the exterior in cedar, which the Citrons loved and decided to keep.
He added floor-to-ceiling windows by Andersen, which allow low winter sunlight to warm the interior in colder months.
With post-and-beam construction, a thin roof profile, and an open floor plan that facilitates an interplay between the interior and exterior, the Dwell Prefab Palm Springs by Turkel Design bears all the signatures of the architecture firm. The show home is its first in California, which allowed Turkel and his team to put extra emphasis on indoor/outdoor living.
The Rudin House in Madison, built following Lloyd Wright's prefabricated Plan #2 for Marshall Erdman's company, is one of two homes built as a large, flat-roofed square with a double-height living room accented with a wall of windows. [Photo via Mike Condren]
New York City boasts only two Frank Lloyd Wright structures: the Guggenheim Museum, and this modest prefab on Staten Island. The Cass House was built according to the Prefab #1 plan he designed for Erdman's prefab company. According to the New York Times, "It was built late in his life from a plan for prefab moderate-cost housing. The components were made in a Midwest factory and shipped to Staten Island for construction under the supervision of a Wright associate, Morton H. Delson... Wright had planned to tour the Staten Island house, but shortly before his scheduled arrival he became ill and died at age 92 on April 9, 1959." [Photo via Bridge and Tunnel Club]
The only grouping of Frank Lloyd Wright's early American System-Built Homes—built by Arthur Richards and designed with standardized components for mass appeal to moderate-income families—is situated in the Burnham Park neighborhood in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The four model 7A duplexes, one model B1 bungalow (shown here), and model C3 bungalow were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. [Photo via McNees.org]
Judin was fascinated by the abandoned gas station ever since he first discovered it in 1992. At the time, it had been unused for seven years. He finally purchased it in 2005 and transformed it into a one-of-a-kind residence.
At night, the exterior is lit with small LED bulbs for minimum impact. Steps are carved directly into the mountain landscape, leading visitors into one of the home’s two main entrances.
Privacy and respect for the natural environment was foremost in the new owners’ mind when conceiving the home’s redesign. The placement of the addition limits direct sightlines to neighbors and offers unbroken views of the surrounding area. The aluminum frame and glass walls create a light, airy atmosphere.
During the 2004 renovation the Wilsons replaced the plywood siding with cedar, and used reclaimed brick to maintain the home’s classic appearance.
Originally constructed in 1970, the Wilson residence was updated by the architect couple in 2004. They expanded the home by about a third, but the original design of the rear elevation (seen here at dusk) was largely maintained.
Miller House Exterior
Miller House Front Facade
Marcel Breuer Hooper House II Exterior Courtyard
Marcel Breuer Hooper House II Exterior Courtyard House View
Marcel Breuer Hooper House II Exterior Side Wall
Segerholt Residence Exterior Driveway
An ipe fence and a neon-yellow resin screen fashioned from recycled acrylic panels draw visitors toward the entrance to the Kreadens’ renovated Eichler house.
In the outdoor living area, orange Primary Pouf stools by Quinze & Milan and an ipe bench surround the central fire pit. An outdoor kitchen neighbors its interior counterpart. In addition to a grill, it accommodates a table and bench by Kayu.
The living area opens beautifully into the outdoor area, which is a key design element of Eichler homes. Photo by Mariko Reed.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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