84 Exterior House Building Type Mid Century Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

The main living space is constructed of immense I-profiles, allowing for a full wall of glass with four large sliding doors that open to the backyard.
A guest room and office wing were added to the front of the house. This left the living room roof in tact – a key feature of the original design, and created a front courtyard that define the entry sequence as a unique experience.
The architects felt that a strong vertical addition would draw extra attention to the original house’s strong horizontal character. The tower itself is a reinterpretation of an A-frame from another Strenger house five doors down.
He added floor-to-ceiling windows by Andersen, which allow low winter sunlight to warm the interior in colder months.
With post-and-beam construction, a thin roof profile, and an open floor plan that facilitates an interplay between the interior and exterior, the Dwell Prefab Palm Springs by Turkel Design bears all the signatures of the architecture firm. The show home is its first in California, which allowed Turkel and his team to put extra emphasis on indoor/outdoor living.
The Rudin House in Madison, built following Lloyd Wright's prefabricated Plan #2 for Marshall Erdman's company, is one of two homes built as a large, flat-roofed square with a double-height living room accented with a wall of windows. [Photo via Mike Condren]
A curved concrete block wall conceals one of the three exterior terraces.  Low-slung roofs appear to hover above the landscape.
Judin was fascinated by the abandoned gas station ever since he first discovered it in 1992. At the time, it had been unused for seven years. He finally purchased it in 2005 and transformed it into a one-of-a-kind residence.
At night, the exterior is lit with small LED bulbs for minimum impact. Steps are carved directly into the mountain landscape, leading visitors into one of the home’s two main entrances.
Privacy and respect for the natural environment was foremost in the new owners’ mind when conceiving the home’s redesign. The placement of the addition limits direct sightlines to neighbors and offers unbroken views of the surrounding area. The aluminum frame and glass walls create a light, airy atmosphere.
During the 2004 renovation the Wilsons replaced the plywood siding with cedar, and used reclaimed brick to maintain the home’s classic appearance.
Originally constructed in 1970, the Wilson residence was updated by the architect couple in 2004. They expanded the home by about a third, but the original design of the rear elevation (seen here at dusk) was largely maintained.
Miller House Exterior
Miller House Front Facade
Marcel Breuer Hooper House II Exterior Courtyard
Marcel Breuer Hooper House II Exterior Courtyard House View
An ipe fence and a neon-yellow resin screen fashioned from recycled acrylic panels draw visitors toward the entrance to the Kreadens’ renovated Eichler house.
In the outdoor living area, orange Primary Pouf stools by Quinze & Milan and an ipe bench surround the central fire pit. An outdoor kitchen neighbors its interior counterpart. In addition to a grill, it accommodates a table and bench by Kayu.
The living area opens beautifully into the outdoor area, which is a key design element of Eichler homes. Photo by Mariko Reed.
“So many houses seem like they’re completely still and heavy,” says Dencity architect Staffan Svenson. Inspired by his client’s role in the airline industry, Svenson relished the chance to create a home that evokes motion and lightness.
The decidedly nontraditional structure includes a front wall that opens the living room onto the front yard—and to the rest of the neighborhood, which has enthusiastically welcomed the house and its owner.
All-vinyl siding on the original shell was replaced with natural plywood T1-11 cladding. The second story features engineered brushbox wood plank, as well as Batu decking for the railing and lanai (a sheltered, open-sided patio).
The original house was a single-story structure, not robust enough to carry a second floor. Fritz’s solution was to build an upper level that functions like a bridge, spanning the original structure without compromising it.
Truly Open Eichler Remodel

Klopf Architecture, Arterra Landscape Architects, and Flegels Construction updated a classic Eichler open, indoor-outdoor home. Expanding on the original walls of glass and connection to nature that is common in mid-century modern homes. The completely openable walls allow the homeowners to truly open up the living space of the house, transforming it into an open air pavilion, extending the living area outdoors to the private side yards, and taking maximum advantage of indoor-outdoor living opportunities. Taking the concept of borrowed landscape from traditional Japanese architecture, the fountain, concrete bench wall, and natural landscaping bound the indoor-outdoor space. The Truly Open Eichler is a remodeled single-family house in Palo Alto. This 1,712 square foot, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bathroom is located in the heart of the Silicon Valley.
Modern Atrium House

The owners, inspired by mid-century modern architecture, hired Klopf Architecture to design an Eichler-inspired 21st-Century, energy efficient new home that would replace a dilapidated 1940s home. The home follows the gentle slope of the hillside while the overarching post-and-beam roof above provides an unchanging datum line. The changing moods of nature animate the house because of views through large glass walls at nearly every vantage point. Every square foot of the house remains close to the ground creating and adding to the sense of connection with nature.
Modern Atrium House

The owners, inspired by mid-century modern architecture, hired Klopf Architecture to design an Eichler-inspired 21st-Century, energy efficient new home that would replace a dilapidated 1940s home. The home follows the gentle slope of the hillside while the overarching post-and-beam roof above provides an unchanging datum line. The changing moods of nature animate the house because of views through large glass walls at nearly every vantage point. Every square foot of the house remains close to the ground creating and adding to the sense of connection with nature.
Double Gable Eichler Remodel

The new owners of this home had long dreamed of an Eichler remodel they would live in forever. Their vision was clean, contemporary, and open. Klopf Architecture would design and reconfigure the kitchen / family room, remove some walls and add windows, reconfigure the bathrooms / laundry areas / closets and upgrade systems to be more efficient, while working closely with the talented executive mother of three on selection of interior finishes and fixtures. The owners decorated and furnished the home themselves, with many vintage mid-century modern furniture pieces and original art.
Double Gable Eichler Remodel

The new owners of this home had long dreamed of an Eichler remodel they would live in forever. Their vision was clean, contemporary, and open. Klopf Architecture would design and reconfigure the kitchen / family room, remove some walls and add windows, reconfigure the bathrooms / laundry areas / closets and upgrade systems to be more efficient, while working closely with the talented executive mother of three on selection of interior finishes and fixtures. The owners decorated and furnished the home themselves, with many vintage mid-century modern furniture pieces and original art.
Double Gable Eichler Remodel

The new owners of this home had long dreamed of an Eichler remodel they would live in forever. Their vision was clean, contemporary, and open. Klopf Architecture would design and reconfigure the kitchen / family room, remove some walls and add windows, reconfigure the bathrooms / laundry areas / closets and upgrade systems to be more efficient, while working closely with the talented executive mother of three on selection of interior finishes and fixtures. The owners decorated and furnished the home themselves, with many vintage mid-century modern furniture pieces and original art.
Mid Century Modern View House 

Klopf Architecture, Outer Space Landscape Architects, and Flegels Construction updated a classical 1950s original mid-century modern house designed by the late Frank Lloyd Wright apprentice Ellis Jacobs. Klopf Architecture pushed the original design intent to make the house more open and uniform from space to space, while improving energy efficiency, capitalizing more on the already incredible views, improving the flow of spaces, providing an outdoor living area, and ratcheting up the quality level of the home in general. The updated custom Mid-Century Modern home is a remodeled single-family house in Redwood City. This 2,000 square foot (plus garage), 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home is located in the heart of the Silicon Valley.
Renewed Classic Eichler Remodel

Klopf Architecture, Growsgreen Landscape Design, and Flegel's Construction partnered to bring this mid-century atrium Eichler home up to 21st century standards. Together with the owners, Geoff Campen and the Klopf Architecture team carefully integrated elements and ideas from the mid-century period without making the space seem dated. They entrusted Klopf Architecture to respectfully expand and update the home, while still keeping it “classic”. The Klopf team helped them open up the kitchen, dining, and living spaces into one flowing great room, expand the master suite, replace the kitchen and bathrooms, and provide additional features like an office and powder room, all while maintaining the mid-century modern style of this Silicon Valley home.
The house wraps around a sycamore tree planted at the time of construction. The outdoor furniture is from Selamat Designs. “In most buildings, everything is set,” Robbins says. “In this house, you have three ways you can dine—I love that. The most surprising wonder about the project has been the ability to move things around.”
Schneidman House and owner, Kristin MacDowell (MHA 301).

In 1946, a group of returning servicemen began talks of creating a housing cooperative to build a utopian community on a dusty hillside above Los Angeles. Soon, more than 400 families were on board, and the Mutual Housing Association was born.
The exterior sconces are original to Zaik's 1956 design. JHID rebuilt the rear deck off the living room, which connects to an aggregate patio; the two architectural elements are connected by pathways in variegated bluestone designed by Lilyvilla Gardens.
The addition of a glass wall in the center of the property further opens the interior space to the outside and allows for an additional source of natural light.
Carport of Arens House (MHA 104).

Los Angeles architect Cory Buckner found great interest in the Crestwood Hills project when she and her late husband, architect Nick Roberts, purchased and restored one of the houses, which was built in 1949. She has since spearheaded a preservation movement of the community tract, prompting the City of Los Angeles to designate 19 of the homes as historic cultural monuments.
A home in Krisel's Kings Point development, an 11-acre site off of the Canyon Country Club golf course that was designed in the early 1960s.
The Sandpiper is a group of nine real estate subdivisions (306 homes in total), designed by Krisel and built between 1958 and 1969. Krisel also did all the landscape design for the site.
Another 1956 tract house with a flat roof designed by Krisel.
A tract house with a butterfly roof designed in 1956 for Joe Dunas.
Kings Point—located at the Indians Canyon Golf Resort—is home to 44 condominiums designed by Dan Palmer and William Krisel in 1968. High ceilings, ample clerestory windows, and extensive views of the Jacinto Mountains are among their defining charactertistics.
The 1956 all-white La Casa di Ucello Bianca, designed by an unkown architect, was carefully restored by its current owners.
The horizontal layout of the home allows for easy movement throughout the interior, while the line of the continuous roof seems to extend into the trees. Enlarging the opening of the home allowed for impressive views of the river and surrounding area.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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