485 Exterior House Glass Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

A glimpse of the master bedroom framed with full-height windows and sheltered by a deep roof overhang.
The residence is clad in a combination of vertical grain cedar, Firestone aluminum, and Corten standing-seam metal. The stone is Frontier Sandstone.
The extended overhanging roof with its tongue-and-groove hemlock soffit provides shade and shelter to the elevated courtyard.
The modern Montana home is nestled into a transitional zone between a forested butte and a grassy meadow in the western part of the state.
 A garage and gym are contained within the lowest level of the house.
The meticulously landscaped front yard is low maintenance and features drought tolerant plants and a sprinkler system.
The mix of cedar and stone help integrate the dwelling into its natural setting.
The first floor is made up of glass walls that allow the site to appear to remain uninterrupted.
The steel-sash windows by Hope’s on the upper level are replicas of the originals, while the lower level has custom frosted-glass panels. The facade paint is Black Tar by Benjamin Moore.
A view of the home's exterior from the backyard. Here, you can see the lower level which features laundry and an additional bedroom.
The rectilinear, modernist home features expansive glazing and blurs the lines between the indoors and outdoors.
Beautifully renovated, the home has excellent curb appeal with low maintenance landscaping.
Chris and Laura Porter’s new master suite connects to the rest of the house via an indoor/outdoor bridge that comprises a covered deck and small library; Bonelli windows and Fleetwood sliders look out on a landscape designed by Christine Ferris.
An exterior view of the property.
1Px Dave Tremblay
Exterior
Exterior
View from outdoor porch by Low Design Office
The house from the road.
View on the house from the valley.
The master bedroom is enclosed on three sides, emphasizing the view outward, while the low-slung roof and deep eaves create a sense of horizontality. The bed, nightstands, and light shelf are made from white oak to match the floors; all were designed by the architects.
View from Southwest
West Elevation Detail
View from Boat Dock
Imagining a second home as a cottage retreat gave the team the creative opportunity to “think about how you want to live in comparison to how you’re living,” says Adair. To their clients, this meant centering their daily experience around family, nature, and socialization – emphasizing simplicity and cutting out excess.
Thermoplastic Polyolefin (TPO) was installed for the flat roofs.
Vertical cast-in-place concrete walls break up the building's horizontal forms.
Set between massive oak trees, the home was sensitively placed to minimize site impact.
"The roof of the lower level becomes the terrace of the upper level, with unobstructed views to the south," says principal architect Robert Swatt.
In the entrance, a team with the general contracting firm Martha uncovered an abstract mural that Engels painted himself and then plastered over. He also made the geometric door handle. Simon speculates that Engels sourced the marble, found all over the house, from Expo ’58, after the pavilions had been dismantled.
Villa Engels, the home of the esteemed Belgian modernist Lucien Engels (1928–2016), was falling apart when its second owners bought it in 2013. Yet due to its heritage status, any changes they planned would have to be approved by the provincial preservation office. Engels completed the elongated, cantilevered residence in 1958, the same year he finalized the master plan for Expo ’58, the Brussels World’s Fair that famously featured the Atomium.
Pereira’s modernist ranch for Firestone combined "the strength of his commercial work with the lightness that desert living demanded." The timeless home still looks every bit as contemporary today as it did when it was originally built.
A look at the exterior of the home.
Here's the entrance to The Mothership, which is flanked by lush landscaping.
Topped with a copper roof, the round house is the largest of the property’s three homes. Gleason affectionately nicknamed it “The Mothership.”
Silverman & Cika’s Robert Cika, a former student of Frank Lloyd Wright, was the architect behind the project.
Used as a retreat from New York City, the Hudson Valley home includes a broadcasting studio so Gleason could work in a quieter environment.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.